315th Troop Carrier Group

315th Troop Carrier Group

1942: 52nd Troop Carrier Wing; US Based
1944-45: 52nd Troop Carrier Wing; IX Troop Carrier Command; Ninth Air Force

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315th Troop Carrier Group

Campaigns Normandy, Rome Arno, Southern France, Northern France Holland, Ardennes, Rhineland, Central Europe.

Respectfully dedicated to our comrades
who gave their lives during World War II
while serving with the

315th Troop Carrier Group

Campaigns
Normandy, Rome Arno, Southern France, Northern France
Holland, Ardennes, Rhineland, Central Europe

Erected by WWII 315th Troop Carrier Group Association.

Location. 39° 0.979′ N, 104° 51.31′ W. Marker is in United States Air Force Academy, Colorado, in El Paso County. Marker is in the United States Air Force Academy Cemetery, on Parade Loop west of Stadium Boulevard, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: USAF Academy CO 80840, United States of America. Touch for directions.

Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 379 th Bomb Group (H) (here, next to this marker) World War II Glider Pilots (here, next to this marker) 306 th Bombardment Group (H) (here, next to this marker) 95 th Bomb Group H (here, next to this marker) 492nd Bomb Group (H) & 801st Bomb Group (P) (here, next to this marker) 416th Bombardment Group (L)

(here, next to this marker) 20th Fighter Group (here, next to this marker) 344 th Bomb Group (M) AAF (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in United States Air Force Academy.

More about this marker. Must have a valid ID to enter the USAF Academy grounds.

Also see . . .
1. 315th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF). History of War website entry (Submitted on April 7, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)

2. 315th Troop Carrier Group. Army Air Corps Library and Museum website entry (Submitted on April 7, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)

3. 315th Troop Carrier Group. American Air Museum in Britain website entry (Submitted on April 7, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)

4. The 315th Troop Carrier Group. Group website homepage (Submitted on April 7, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)

5. 315th Airlift Wing History, World War II Fact Sheet. Official United States Air Force website entry (Submitted on April 7, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)

6. Troop Carrier Groups of WWII. Troop Carrier/Tactical Airlift Association website entry (Submitted on April 7, 2021, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)


IX Troop Carrier Command

The IX Troop Carrier Command was constituted on the 11th of October 1943, and activated on the 16th of October 1943 in England, where it was assigned to the 9th Air Force. It was comprised of the 50th, 52nd, and 53rd Troop Carrier Wings. Its first commanding officer was BG Benjamin F. Giles who served from October 1943 to February 1944. He was succeeded by MG Paul L. Williams who served from February 1944 to March 1946.

The original cadre came from Headquarters 1st Troop Carrier Command (six officers only) and the 315th Troop Carrier Group. Its first temporary station was at USAAF #489 at Cottesmore, England, and on October I, 1943 it was joined by the 434th TC Group. At this time both the 315th and the 434th were assigned to the 50th TC Wing. Twelve airfields were assigned to the IX TC Command with each field to have forty gliders and tow planes. The fields were Fulbeck, Langer, Bottesford, Wakerley, Balderton, North Witham, Barkston Heath, Cottesmore, North Luffenham, Saltby, Folkingham, and Woolfox Lodge.

In November 1943, the 435th TC Group and Welford Air Base were assigned to the 50th TC Wing, and IX TC Command Headquarters were moved to Grantham. Ramsbury, Aldermaston, and Greenham Cormmons also became available as landing areas for tactical training with the 101st Airborne Division.

In February 1944 the IX TC Command Pathfinder Group (Provisional) was formed at Cottes more under the command of Lt Col Joel E Crouch. Also in February, the 440th and 439th TC Groups were assigned to the 50th Wing.

In the ETO, the Logistic and Support units that backed up the IX TC Command were:

U.S. Army Service Command
9th A/B Aviation Engineer Btn.
9th Air Force Service Command
8th Air Force Service Command
Air Transport Operation Room
Troop Carrier Command Service
2nd Quartermaster Mobile Btn.
490th Quartermaster Depot Co.

Without these major support units and their auxiliary units, IX Troop Carrier Command and Airborne Services would not have been able to fulfill their assigned tasks.

In 1944, IX Troop Carrier Command became an important component of the First Allied Airborne Army, under the direct jurisdiction of Lt. General Lewis Brereton.

Few people at that time (and even today) are aware of the crucial role that Troop Carrier Forces played in WW II. Troop Carrier crews and glider pilots often flew sorties in their unarmed planes and gliders deep into enemy territory, under 1,000 feet, to deliver men and equipment to targets that were usually defended by enemy troops. This was accomplished through heavy flak and small arms fire, with standing orders not to take evasive action. Glider Pilots, after landing, fought with the Airborne troops to clear the enemy from landing and drop zones Theirs was a dual job pilots in the air, infantry on the ground.

The combined efforts of Troop Carrier forces in Europe and in the Pacific contributed greatly to the eventual collapse of the Axis powers in WW II. Some of these TC Groups are still flying actively today as Military Airlift Wings.

At a meeting between Generals Arnold, Spatz, Bradley, and Major General Paul Williams in April of 1944, General Bradley told General Williams that his armies could not have maintained their rapid advance across France without the supplies laid down by Troop Carrier Command.

Pass in Review

Most WW II Airborne veterans and Troop Carrier veterans have long ago hashed over the Normandy D-Day flights—but not all. There is still some lively discussion.

There are a few left who haven’t satisfied themselves—enough that portions of a letter that Col. Joe Harkiewicz wrote to his squadron mates in 2001 are included here. Col. Harkiewicz served as the historian for the 29th Troop Carrier Squadron for many years before he passed away. He was an avid historian, and was extremely impatient with the unprofessional behavior of today’s Commercial “Pop” historians.”

At any rate, here are some passing thoughts from his notes:

“It is prudent to remind everyone that IX Troop Carrier Command had no voice in selecting the invasion date, or any choice in the kind of weather we were ordered to fly in. We assembled and took off as ordered, and flew the mission as best we could under the conditions we faced. And most surprising of all, there was no contingency plan from SHAEF for coping with the marginal weather.

Speed for Real

“There are also reports in the “pop histories” about the speed of some of the aircraft during the drops. These reports claim witness to odd altitudes and excessive speeds over the drop zones. In the ways of war, some of this may have happened, but from USAAF archives, and from readily available airborne records, it appears far from the norm.

Most Troop Carrier veterans who read the “pop histories,” or who watch the “pop TV” reports, are skeptical of these claims—simply because there is no viable way for anyone in the back of a dark C-47 to read its altitude and airspeed. Not even experienced crew chiefs and radio operators could do that. It is even more difficult from the ground.”

The Illusion of Speed

“This is tricky, not easy—but here is why some paratroopers may have thought their C-47 gained speed as it approached the drop zone. There are two main power settings for a C-47—the manifold pressure (a measure of the power that propels the airplane through the air)—and the revolutions per minute of the engines. And adjusting these together was a technique used during every landing to slow the airplane down before touchdown. When some C-47 pilots wanted to reduce power and slow down to lose altitude quickly during a paradrop, they reduced the manifold pressure (the driving power), and then increased the revolutions to about 2300. The windmilling effect of this faster rpm acted as an air brake. Most of us have had a plastic toy windmill blade on a stick that we waved around or held out of a car window to make it turn. The principle is the same. The airflow required to keep the plastic blade turning without applying driving power to it acted as a brake, while the toy turned faster and whizzed louder.

So it was with the engines. Our formations were briefed to fly over the coast at 1,500 ft. to stay above small arms fire—and then to descended to 700 ft. for the paradrop. The pilots reduced the manifold pressure and started to slow down—although the sound of the advancing revolutions could have been misleading. This sounded like more power, but it was just more noise that led some paratroopers to think the speed was increasing when actually it was decreasing.

Also, upon reaching drop altitude, an increase in power (throttle) was usually applied to hold and maintain drop altitude and speed. This had to be done very carefully to keep the airplanes slow and level, without flaps, and without raising the nose. At slower speeds (drop speed) it’s much harder to control a C-47. It can be a fight to just hold it straight and level while being buffeted by prop Wash. This could have caused some paratroopers to believe the pilots were increasing their airspeed.”

The Plus Side

“For almost every ‘pop history’ story that might benefit from further checking, Troop Carrier aircrews can document incidents where pilots made multiple passes at the DZs, or held burning aircraft straight and level while the troopers jumped. Several of these reports of dedication and heroism that troop carriers remember with pride, are fully supported in this publication.”

The � mph C-47”
“In a recent (2001) History Channel report, it was claimed that a unit of the 101st Airborne Division was flown across the drop zone in a C-47 at 200 mph. This bears checking into most C-47s just won’t go that fast in level flight. This might have happened if the pilots were incapacitated (dead/wounded) and no longer in control, and the aircraft was in a power dive. There could have been such cases.”

Scattering

“The Troop Carrier delivery formation of nine aircraft, V of V’s like a flock of geese, was designed to put the aircraft in the closest proximity to each other and still avoid turbulence from the preceding aircraft. This is called a serial, and the only way to drop paratroopers close together is for the aircraft to fly close together and release them at nearly the same time. On D-Day when the aircraft suddenly found themselves in the clouds, the integrity of much of the formation was lost. This, not bad navigation, is the reason for some paratroopers being scattered around the Cherbourg Peninsula. It was not lack of training in night formation, or in combat experience. And the many stories of flight crews making return passes over their DZs to drop their troops must be weighed against any conjecture of cowardice among the flight crews.

Trying to orient oneself after coming out of the clouds was all but impossible. Pilotage (navigating by visual means) depends upon following landmarks, one connecting to the other. Ground vision was lost while in the clouds, thus disrupting this continuity. The darkness of night, the blackout conditions on the ground, the loss of night vision (compromised by explosions from enemy fire), and the lack of functioning radio-radar aids, made things even harder.

Purely and simply, once the formation went into the clouds, some pilots lost their way. Re-establishing themselves accurately was next to impossible, and the scattering of paratroopers was inevitable. Even today, with the most modern equipment, military paratroopers still need visual flying conditions if they are to drop their troops together.”

Jostling

“Much has been said over the years by the observers and “pop historians” about dodging flak and small arms fire—and this needs to be addressed.

» “Once you see the explosion of an anti-aircraft shell (flak), it has done its potential damage, and there is no further use in trying to avoid it.
» If there was any dodging, it most likely occurred when trying to get out of a lock-on by German searchlights. The odds for survival in this situation were very low.
» Jostling the paratroopers could have been caused by nearby flak explosions, turbulence from prop wash caused by the disrupted formations, and/or abrupt maneuvering control to avoid other aircraft.
» Panic was possible, but there has been very little of this documented—either among the aircrew or among the paratroopers. That is what one would expect of Americans.”

IX Troop Carrier Commands Final and Finest Efforts

In the closing days of war in Europe, in April of 1945 Troop carrier planes flew a total of 16,387 sorties, many of them in the face of enemy flak and small arms fire. By April 20th, Troop Carrier Command had used 240 airfields Cherbourg to Leipsig for these sorties.

The first 20 days of April 1945, saw 35,962 wounded evacuated from forward battle areas by Troop Carrier Crews. For the First Time in History, general hospitals were able to stay up to 300.miles in the rear because of the speed and efficiency of the Air Corps in evacuating casualties. The most serious cases were flown directly to England.

In the same time span, IX Carrier planes during the German Campaign delivered 44,212,200 tons of freight, and 7,727,075 gallons of gasoline to our rapidly movlllg ground forces. On April 4th alone, they deliveied to the front more tonnage in thls slngle day than fhe entire tonnage for the first 3 months of 1945. From the airstrips all over Germany, they flew 451000 American, British, French Russians, Poles and Italians released prisoners of war back from the areas of their captivity in Germany. This was truly a monumental effort and successful accomplishment on the part of all those C-47 Squadrons and their supporting ground crews—and all of this activity at this point In time surpassed the activities of both the Eighth and in the Ninth Air Forces.

On the 9th of April 1945, one of Troop Carriers smoothest operations of the war was demonstrated in and around the town of Crailsheim, in Germany, A US Armored spearhead, Combat Command A, of the lOth Armored Division had advanced so far and so fast, that they were pinched off and surrounded by units of an Alpine Regiment, and a German battalion of SS training units.

Short of gasoline and ammunition, the Americans sent out an urgent SOS for aid. Twenty two supply trucks rounded up from the VI Corps that attempted to break through to them were destroyed by a determined and desperate enemy intent on wiping out thls just as a determined American group. At this point, Troop Carrier seemed to be the only answer.

Thirty four C-47s loaded with 160,00 Ibs of gasoline, 37,865 Ibs of ammunitions and 5,400 Ibs of K-rations of the 441st Group took off from Dreux, France. They hedgehopped and flew on the deck through heavy flak and small arms fire and landed in a small cow pasture just outside of Crailsheim. The enemy, only 1,500 yards away, kept the field under consent shellfire-destroyed one plane.

One other plane was lost on the way in (hitting a hill due to fog.) The remaining aircraft with 42 wounded on board made some very heavy take-offs and arrived back at base with four planes having major damage due to enemy fire.

The next day the same thing with 16 C-47s. As a direct result of this Air Corps effort by the 441st Group, the beleaguered armored unit was able to fight its way out of the pocket with over 2,O00 prisoners. This only a small part of the overall picture of Troop Carriers at the end of the war, and the time after the War.

With the ground transportation in such bad shape due to our Air Corps success in destroying it, the only way of getting around was by Air, and the ever faithful C-47.


World War II

After training in the US, moved to England, October–November 1942, for service with Eighth Air Force. Encountering bad weather while flying the North Atlantic route, the air echelon remained for about a month in Greenland, where it searched for missing aircraft and dropped supplies to downed crews.

After the air and ground echelons were united in Dec, the group began ferrying cargo in the British Isles and training with airborne troops and gliders. In May 1943 a "detachment" comprising almost all the group aircraft, aircrews, and most support personnel, deployed to North Africa to support Twelfth Air Force and other Mediterranean Theater of Operations organizations during the invasions of Sicily and Italy. Although the group did not participate in the airborne phase of the invasions, it did support those operations by transporting supplies in the theater.

In March 1944 the detachment returned to England and rejoined the group, which had been reassigned to Ninth Air Force in October 1943. Prepared for the invasion of the Continent, and dropped paratroops near Cherbourg early on 6 June 1944, earning a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for its action in the Normandy invasion.

Dropped paratroops of the 82d Airborne Division on 17 September 1944 when the Allies launched the air attack on the Netherlands flew reinforcement missions on succeeding days, landing at Grave on 26 September to unload paratroops and supplies. Airlifted gasoline and other critical supplies to Antwerp and Liege during the Battle of the Bulge, December 1944 – January 1945.

Released British paratroops near Wesel during the airborne assault across the Rhine in March 1945. Following each airborne operation, the group resumed transport activities, hauling cargo and evacuating wounded personnel. Moved to France in April 1945.

Transported cargo and evacuated allied former prisoners of war until after V-E Day. Moved to Trinidad in May 1945 and transported troops returning to the US. Inactivated on 31 July 1945.

Cold War

Activated in 1947, the group was not manned or equipped, and inactivated again in 1948. Next activated in Japan in 1952, assigned to Far East Forces, for duty during the Korean War. Flew troop and cargo airlift and airdrop, leaflet drops, spray missions, air evacuation, search and rescue, and other aerial missions between Japan and Korea. Remained in the Far East after the war to fly transport missions and paratroop training flights. Flew missions in Japan, Korea, French Indo-China, and other points until December 1954. Inactivated in Japan on 18 January 1955.

Organized in South Vietnam in December 1962, replacing a provisional troop carrier group. Exercised control over USAF airlift resources in Vietnam, using attached squadrons until permanent squadrons were assigned in July 1963. Provided combat evaluation of YC-123 aircraft, February–April 1963. Exercised control of some CV-2 aircraft of US Army, July–December 1963 and of a CV-2 Royal Australian Air Force detachment, 1964–1966. Gained the Ranch Hand defoliation mission in July 1964. Replaced in March 1966 by the 315th Air Commando Wing.

Modern era

Activated at Charleston AFB, SC, in the Reserve in August 1992 to control the airlift operations of the 315th Airlift Wing. Flew contingency operation, humanitarian airlift missions, and exercises worldwide, 1992–. In 1993, the 315th was the first Air Force Reserve group to fly the C-17 Globemaster III. It took part in the first US-Russian joint military exercise in 1994.

Lineage

  • Established as 315th Transport Group on 2 February 1942
  • Activated on 19 May 1947
  • Redesignated 315th Troop Carrier Group, Medium, on 23 May 1952
  • Redesignated 315th Troop Carrier Group, Assault, and activated, on 9 November 1962
  • Redesignated: 315th Operations Group on 1 August 1992

Assignments

  • Air Service Command, 14 February 1942 , 31 March 1942 , 20 June 1942 , c. 29 November 1942
    , 16 October 1943 , 18 February 1944
  • Caribbean Wing, Air Transport Command, 15 May – 31 July 1945
    , 19 May 1947 – 10 September 1948 , 10 June 1952 – 18 January 1955 , 9 November 1962 , 8 December 1962 – 8 March 1966
    , 1 August 1992–present

Components

  • 6th Transport Squadron: March–June 1942 : 10 June 1952 – 18 January 1955 8 October 1964 – 8 March 1966 : 14 February – 11 November 1942 (detached 27 September – 11 November 1942) (NM): 14 February 1942 – 31 July 1945 19 May 1947 – 10 September 1948 10 June 1952 – 18 January 1955
  • 35th Transport Squadron: 14 February – 8 June 1942 (UA): 15 June 1942 – 31 July 1945 19 May 1947 – 10 September 1948 10 June 1952 – 18 January 1955 : 11 June – 22 October 1942 (detached) : 26 October 1942 – 14 March 1943 (detached) : 5 December 1942 – 14 March 1943 (detached) : 1 August 1992-Presen (M6): 26 April 1944 – 31 July 1945 1 July 1963 – 8 March 1966 (4A): 26 April 1944 – 31 July 1945 8 July 1963 – 8 March 1966 : 8 July 1963 – 8 March 1966
  • 317th Airlift Squadron: 1 August 1992–present
  • 344th Troop Carrier Squadron: 10 June 1952 – 18 January 1955 (detached 14 December 1952 – 13 October 1953) : 1 August 1992–present : 1 August 1992 – 1 July 2000 : 1–8 July 1963
  • 777th Troop Carrier Squadron: attached 17 April – 30 June 1963, assigned 1–8 July 1963
  • Tactical Air Force Transport, Provisional, 2: attached 8 December 1962 – 8 July 1963.

Stations

    , Pennsylvania, 14 February 1942 , Kentucky, 18 June 1942 , South Carolina, 4 August–October 1942 (AAF-467), England, December 1942 (AAF-474), England, 6 November 1943 (AAF-493), England, 7 February 1944
    (B-48), France, 6 April – 13 May 1945 , Trinidad, c. 24 May – 31 July 1945 , Virginia, 19 May 1947 – 10 September 1948 , Japan, 10 June 1952 – 18 January 1955 , South Vietnam, 8 December 1962 – 8 March 1966 , South Carolina, 1 August 1992–present

Aircraft

  • Primarily C-47, 1942–1945, but included C-60, 1942 C-53, 1942 and 1944–1945 and C-46, 1945. C-46, 1952–1955.
  • Primarily C-123, 1962–1966, but included YC-123, 1963 CV-2, 1963 and 1964–1966 HUC-123, 1964–1965 UC-123, 1965–1966 and C-130, 1965–1966. , 1992-c. 2000 , 1993–present

315th Troop Carrier Group USAAF

At present no image of this war memorial is available for online display. If you have a photograph of this war memorial, please send it to [email protected] for inclusion on the Register. The image will be credited to yourself and free for reuse for non-commercial purposes by others under the IWM Non Commercial Licence.

Memorial details

Current location

Roadside,
Harringworth to Laxton Rd,
Spanhoe
East Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
NN17 3AT
England

OS Grid Ref: SP 93625 96253
Denomination: Undefined

  • Second World War (1939-1945)
    Total names on memorial: 54
    Served and returned: Undefined
    Died: 54
    Exact count: no
    Information shown: Undefined
    Order of information: Undefined
  • Second World War memorial
    Measurements: depth 800MM, height 3000MM, width 800MM
    Materials: Stone
  • 315th Troop Carrier Group War Memorial at Spanhoe Airfield
  • Grade II
  • This memorial is protected, and listed on the National Heritage List for England maintained by Historic England. View list entry
  • More about listing and the protection of historic places can be found on the Historic England website
  • Spanhoe WW2 Airfield : U.S.A.A.F. 315th. Troop Carrier Group.
  • WMO ID: 217706
  • Condition: Undefined [last updated on 26-09-2019]
  • EIGHTH AIR FORCE REMEMBERED by FOX, GEORGE H 116-117 Source: Image Library NIWM Published:ISO 1991 WESTMINSTER BRIDGE ROAD, LONDON

This record comprises all information held by IWM’s War Memorials Register for this memorial. Where we hold a names list for the memorial, this information will be displayed on the memorial record. Please check back as we are adding more names to the database.

This information is made available under a Creative Commons BY-NC licence.

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Contents

    (300 AS) (317 AS) (701 AS)
  • 315th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron (315 AES)
  • 315th Airlift Control Flight (315 ACF)
  • 4th Combat Camera Squadron (4 CTCS)

315th Maintenance Group (315 MXG)

  • 315th Maintenance Squadron (315 MXS)
  • 315th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (315 AMXS)
  • 315th Maintenance Operations Squadron (315 MOS)

315th Mission Support Group (315 MSG)

  • 38th Aerial Port Squadron (38 APS)
  • 53d Aerial Port Squadron (53 APS)
  • 81st Aerial Port Squadron (81 APS)
  • 84th Aerial Port Squadron (84 APS)
  • 315th Mission Support Squadron (315 MSS)
  • 315th Security Forces Squadron (315 SFS)
  • 315th Services Flight (315 SVF)
  • 315th Logistics Readiness Flight (315 LRF)

Established as 315 Troop Carrier Wing, Medium, on 23 May 1952 under Far East Air Force in Japan. Activated on 10 Jun 1952. During the Korean War, the wing flew troop and cargo airlift and airdrop, leaflet drops, spray missions, air evacuation, search and rescue, and other aerial missions in theater as part of Far East Air Forces 315th Air Division. It remained in the Far East after the war to fly transport missions and paratroop training flights in Japan, Korea, French Indo-China, and other points until December 1954, after which it was again inactivated 18 Jan 1955. [2]

Reactivated in 21 Feb 1966 under Pacific Air Forces, the unit was assigned to Tan Son Nhut Air Base, South Vietnam. It engaged in special operations directly under Seventh Air Force in Saigon, operating C-123 Provider aircraft with Air Commando squadrons engaging in unconventional warfare. Moved to Phan Rang AB in 1967. Also operated UC-123 aerial spraying aircraft for Operation Ranch Hand defoliation missions over South Vietnam. Phased out special operations missions in 1970 and engaged in theater transport missions within South Vietnam. In 1971, became a training organization for Republic of Vietnam Air Force C-123 aircrews. Inactivated in March 1972. [2]


Lineage

  • Established as the 315th Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy on 7 June 1944
  • Consolidated with the Table of Distribution 315th Air Division on 1 July 1978 (remained inactive) [2]

Table of Distribution 315th Bombardment Wing

  • Established as the 315th Air Division on 13 August 1948
  • Consolidated with the 315th Air Division on 1 July 1978 [2]

Assignments

  • Second Air Force, 17 July 1944 (attached XXII Bomber Command), c. 14 August-c. 7 December 1944
  • Twentieth Air Force, c. 25 March 1945
  • XXI Bomber Command, 5 April 1945
  • Twentieth Air Force, 16 July 1945
  • Fifth Air Force, 30 May 1946
  • V Fighter Command, 30 May 1946
  • Fifth Air Force, 1 June 1946 – 1 March 1950
  • Far East Air Forces (later Pacific Air Forces), 25 January 1951 – 15 April 1969 [2]

Components

World War II

  • 16th Bombardment Group: 14 April 1945 – 15 April 1946
  • 24th Air Service Group: 14 April 1945 – 15 April 1946
  • 73d Air Service Group: 12 May 1945 – 15 April 1946
  • 75th Air Service Group: 15 April 1945 – 15 May 1946
  • 76th Air Service Group: 12 May 1945 – 15 April 1946
  • 331st Bombardment Group: 12 May 1945 – 15 April 1946
  • 501st Bombardment Group: 15 April 1945 – 15 May 1946
  • 502d Bombardment Group: 12 May 1945 – 15 April 1946 [2]

United States Air Force

  • 8th Fighter Wing (later 8th Fighter-Bomber Wing): 18 August 1948 – 1 March 1950
  • 38th Bombardment Wing: 18 August 1948 – 1 April 1949
  • 314th Tactical Airlift Wing: 22 January 1966 – 8 April 1969
  • 315th Troop Carrier Wing: 10 June 1952 – 18 January 1955
  • 347th Fighter Wing: 18 August 1948 – 1 March 1950
  • 374th Troop Carrier Wing (later 374th Tactical Airlift Wing): 25 January 1951 – 1 July 1957, 8 August 1966 – 8 April 1969
  • 403d Troop Carrier Wing: 14 April 1952 – 1 January 1953
  • 437th Troop Carrier Wing: 25 January 1951 – 10 June 1952
  • 475th Fighter Wing: 18󈞀 August 1948
  • 483d Troop Carrier Wing: 1 January 1953 – 25 June 1960
  • 463d Tactical Airlift Wing   : 23 November 1965 – 8 April 1969 [2]
  • 8th Fighter Group: 31 May 1946 – 18 August 1948
  • 38th Bombardment Group: 31 May 1946 – 18 August 1948
  • 61st Troop Carrier Group: attached 25 January 1951 – 21 November 1952
  • 314th Troop Carrier Group: attached 25 January 1951 – 15 November 1954
  • 315th Troop Carrier Group (later 315th Air Commando Group): 8 December 1962 – 8 March 1966 (detached entire period)
  • 316th Troop Carrier Group: attached 15 November 1954 – 18 March 1955, assigned 18 March 1955 – 18 January 1957 (detached entire period)
  • 347th Fighter Group: 25 September 1947 – 18 August 1948
  • 6315th Operations Group: 20 October 1964 – 8 August 1966
  • Combat Cargo (Troop Carrier) Group, Provisional, 6492d: attached 21 September-8 Dec 1962 [2]
  • 21st Troop Carrier Squadron: 25 June 1960 – 8 August 1966 (detached entire period)
  • 24th Helicopter Squadron: 13 October 1956 – 8 March 1960
  • 25th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron: 31 May 1946 – 28 February 1947, attached 28 February 1947 – 15 April 1948
  • 29th Troop Carrier Squadron: 27 January-25 Mar 1966
  • 35th Troop Carrier Squadron: 8 January 1963 – 8 August 1966 (detached entire period)
  • 38th Tactical Airlift Squadron: attached 8 February-19 Jul 1968
  • 41st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron: 18 September 1945 – 4 January 1946
  • 41st Troop Carrier Squadron: c. 21 November 1965 – 8 August 1966 (detached entire period)
  • 50th Troop Carrier Squadron: attached 1 October 1951 – 15 November 1954 assigned 26 December 1965 – 23 February 1966
  • 68th Fighter Squadron: attached 10 April-24 Nov 1947
  • 345th Troop Carrier Squadron: 1 June 1962 – 8 January 1963 27 November 1965 – 25 March 1966 (detached entire period)
  • 346th Tactical Airlift Squadron: attached 7 January-25 Mar 1969
  • 347th Tactical Airlift Squadron: attached 19 July-18 Oct 1968
  • 348th Tactical Airlift Squadron: 18 October 1968 – 7 January 1969
  • 421st Night Fighter Squadron: 31 May 1946 – 20 February 1947
  • 433d Fighter Squadron: attached 15 October 1946 – 18 November 1947
  • 776th Troop Carrier Squadron: 26 December 1965 – 25 March 1966
  • 777th Tactical Airlift Squadron: attached 31 March-1 Aug 1968
  • 778th Tactical Airlift Squadron: attached 1󈞃 August 1968
  • 779th Tactical Airlift Squadron: attached 7 February-31 Mar 1968
  • 815th Troop Carrier (later, 815th Tactical Airlift) Squadron: 25 June 1960 – 1 November 1968
  • 817th Troop Carrier Squadron: 25 June 1960 – 8 August 1966 (detached entire period)
  • 6461st Troop Carrier Squadron (later 6461 Air Transport Squadron): 1 December 1952 – 24 June 1955 (detached entire period)
  • 6475th Flying Training Squadron: 25 November 1954 – 18 May 1955 (detached entire period)
  • 6485th Operations Squadron: 17 September 1956 – 1 September 1968 attached 1 December 1968 – 8 April 1969 [2]

Stations

  • Peterson Field, Colorado, 17 July 1944
  • Fort Lawton, Washington, 10󈝽 March 1945
  • Northwest Field, Guam, Mariana Islands, 5 April 1945
  • Ashiya Army Air Base, Japan, 30 May 1946
  • Itazuke Army Air Base (later Itazuke Airfield, Itazuke Air Base), Japan, 31 May 1946 – 1 March 1950.
  • Ashiya Air Station, Japan, 25 January 1951
  • Fuchu Air Station, Japan, 5 February 1951
  • Tachikawa Air Base, Japan, 24 April 1954 – 15 April 1969 [2]

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World War II Database

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  • » 1,102 biographies
  • » 334 events
  • » 38,814 timeline entries
  • » 1,144 ships
  • » 339 aircraft models
  • » 191 vehicle models
  • » 354 weapon models
  • » 120 historical documents
  • » 226 facilities
  • » 464 book reviews
  • » 27,600 photos
  • » 359 maps

"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."

Winston Churchill, on the RAF

The World War II Database is founded and managed by C. Peter Chen of Lava Development, LLC. The goal of this site is two fold. First, it is aiming to offer interesting and useful information about WW2. Second, it is to showcase Lava's technical capabilities.


History

Established as 315 Troop Carrier Wing, Medium, on 23 May 1952 under Far East Air Force in Japan. Activated on 10 Jun 1952. During the Korean War, the wing flew troop and cargo airlift and airdrop, leaflet drops, spray missions, air evacuation, search and rescue, and other aerial missions in theater as part of Far East Air Forces 315th Air Division. It remained in the Far East after the war to fly transport missions and paratroop training flights in Japan, Korea, French Indo-China, and other points until December 1954, after which it was again inactivated 18 Jan 1955. [2]

Reactivated in 21 Feb 1966 under Pacific Air Forces, the unit was assigned to Tan Son Nhut Air Base, South Vietnam. It engaged in special operations directly under Seventh Air Force in Saigon, operating C-123 Provider aircraft with Air Commando squadrons engaging in unconventional warfare. Moved to Phan Rang AB in 1967. Also operated UC-123 aerial spraying aircraft for Operation Ranch Hand defoliation missions over South Vietnam. Phased out special operations missions in 1970 and engaged in theater transport missions within South Vietnam. In 1971, became a training organization for Republic of Vietnam Air Force C-123 aircrews. Inactivated in March 1972. [2]