Hall of Fame and Statue of Bavaria

Hall of Fame and Statue of Bavaria



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Commissioned by King Ludwig I of Bavaria and designed and built from Kelheim limestone by Leo von Klenze, the Ruhmeshalle – Hall of Fame – is a Doric colonnade with a wide main range and two wings. It was built between 1843 and 1853 using ancient Greek architecture as inspiration and is 68-metres long by 38-metres deep.

Inside are over 90 busts of Bavaria’s most celebrated people including artists, politicians and scientists as well as the Palatinate, Franconia and Swabia.

At the front of the Hall of fame stands Bavaria, an 18.5-metre high bronze statue designed by Ludwig Schwanthaler and cast by Ferdinand von Miller. It sits on a 9-metre platform and weighs close to 90 tons. She is vested in a bearskin holding in her left hand an oak crown and in her right hand a leash attached to a lion at her side – supposedly a symbol of Bavarian strength.

Her sheer size, scale, weight and intricate detail were hailed as a technological masterpiece when she was unveiled in the early 1850s.

There is a spiral staircase inside the statue which you can climb and look out over Munich’s Theresienwiese, the location of the world-famous Oktoberfest.


Bavaria

Enthroned at an impressive height of 18 metres, Bavaria, patroness of the Bavarian state, presides over Munich from the edge of Theresienwiese. The monument, the first colossal statue to be made entirely of bronze since the classical period, is a true feat of engineering.

The Bavarian King Ludwig I commissioned the monumental statue in 1837. It is surrounded by the Hall of Fame, which houses busts of prominent Bavarians from the last few centuries. The ensemble was intended as a patriotic monument, reminding people of the accomplishments and glory of Bavaria.

Ludwig&rsquos private and royal architect, Leo von Klenze, was tasked, along with sculptor Ludwig Schwanthaler, with designing the Bavaria statue. Munich-born metal caster Johann Baptist Stiglmaier and his nephew Ferdinand von Miller were commissioned with casting the statue in bronze.

&ldquoOnly Nero and I have produced such giant statues &ndash no-one has done it since Nero&rsquos time,&rdquo the Bavarian king commented at the time on his decision to construct the statue. And indeed, he was right &ndash this was the first time since the classical period that a colossal artwork had been created using traditional metalworking processes. However, Bavaria has little in common with any classical statue when it comes to her appearance: wearing a bearskin, sword and oak wreath, and flanked by a lion, she makes a distinctly German display.

The casting of Bavaria is one of the true technical feats of the 19th century. When the head of Bavaria was raised from the sandpit on 11 September 1844, and lifted four metres above the ground, Miller was able to present a magnificent spectacle to the king. Stunned and speechless, Ludwig I watched as no fewer than 28 workers and two children &ndash Miller&rsquos sons Fritz and Ferdinand &ndash climbed into the gigantic head For a long time, the king was convinced it was a trick.

By the time the statue of Bavaria was finally inaugurated in 1850, however, its creator Ludwig Schwanthaler was already dead and its commissioner, Ludwig I, was no longer king.

How much the lady must have seen, and been forced to see, since then! Peace demonstrations and revolutionary marches after the First World War, Nazi celebrations, bombs dropped on her beloved city, a plane crash, an attack, and even a sinkhole.

Undoubtedly her favourite thing is to look down on the many kinds of public entertainment that take place on the Theresienwiese below, whether it be a circus, the Tollwood Winter Festival, the Central Agricultural Festival &ndash or, of course, Oktoberfest. She has also emerged unscathed from repairs after the turn of the millennium. She does not really feel the hollow collisions inside her from dizzy people who are no longer quite as sure-footed as usual, but who still want to look down on the Wiesn from above. May she continue to look upon us for a long time to come!

However, Bavaria also has other faces. From the largest Bavaria to the oldest: both a copy and the original of Hubert Gerhard&rsquos goddess Bavarica, over 400 years old, can be seen in Munich. A reproduction of the piece crowns the Temple in the Hofgarten. The original can be seen up close and personal just a few metres away among the bronze pillars of the Residenz.

From 2010 to 2018, Munich has been home to yet another Bavaria: Cabaret artist Luise Kinseher embodied this splendid Bavarian female figure in a tongue-in-cheek way once a year at the festival marking the ceremonial tapping of the Salvator keg. At this event, she read the riot act to the political bigwigs of the city, and impersonated Bavaria&rsquos patroness as the loving, but strict Mama Bavaria.


Bavaria statue and Hall of fame in Munich - stock photo

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Bronzes are alloys of copper and tin, with copper being the most abundant material. But they may also incorporate other metals, such as aluminium and nickel, or even non-metals, such as phosphorus or silicon.

The percentage of each material in the alloy affects its properties (hardness, ease to cast, resistance to corrosion, machinability, colour, etc.). The addition of new elements to the matrix of copper alters its microscopic structure thus changing its properties and reaction to external conditions. The composition of the Bavaria Statue is 92% copper, 5% zinc, 2% tin, and 1% lead.

Why is the Bavaria Statue Green?

It is widely known that the colour of pure copper is its characteristic reddish-brown. Nevertheless, many famous statues that are made of copper alloys like the Buddha Kamakura Daihatsu, Gautama Buddha, and the renowned Statue of Liberty in New York are actually greenish-blue. Copper forms a multitude of compounds of different oxidation states which all vary in colour.

The copper present in the bronze tends to form the stable copper(II) oxide, which is brown. Under other atmospheric conditions with the presence of acids, the oxides of the copper tend to form copper(II) acetate, a green substance also known as verdigris.

The difference between the conditions of the greenish Statue of Liberty and the Bavaria Statue is that in New York there is more air pollution. This results in acid rain which tends to form the verdigris on the surface of the statue.

In Munich, the presence of acid rain is not an issue consequently, the Bavaria Statue changed from its original reddish colour to a more stable brown of the copper(II) oxide. Nonetheless, we can observe some slightly blue or green tones on the Munich icon. This may also be due to the verdigris since acidic conditions can also appear by microbiological activity, but in less magnitude compared to acid rain.


Munich, Bavaria (Germany), Ruhmeshalle (Hall of Fame, Salón de la Fama, Temple de la renommée, Arca di Gloria, Galeria sławy), Theresienhöhe

The Hall of Fame and Bavaria form the most famous landmarks on the edge of the Theresienwiese and are well worth a visit.

The Hall of Fame and Bavaria form on the Theresien height an ensemble in style of the ancient Acropolis in Athens, which was commissioned by King Ludwig I there. Together with his architect Leo von Klenze King Ludwig I shaped the cityscape of Munich like no other. He was a friend of the monasteries and the academic spirit, and he turned his attention to painting and poetry.

As crown prince Ludwig after the death of his father in 1825 took over the throne of Bavaria he was already dreaming of his "Athens on the Isar" with monumental squares and buildings. Whereas his childhood and youth was influenced by the French Revolution and the subsequent Napoleonic wars, as crown prince he longed for a "Bavarian of all tribes" and a "bigger German nation." In this phase, Ludwig was planning a patriotic monument in the capital city of Munich and for this purpose he already in 1809 by historian Lorenz Westenrieder he had made a list of famous Bavarian representatives of all classes and professions. Approximately 20 years later this list was on his behalf by his Interior Minister Eduard von Schenk - in the meantime Ludwig was King of Bavaria - renewed and expanded.

For the tender for a Hall of Fame above the Theresienwiese with space for 200 busts King Ludwig I invited the best and most prestigious builders of those times:

Joseph Daniel Ohlmüller and

Hall of Fame after the scetch of Leo von Klenze

As the court master builder of that time of the king, Leo von Klenze had significant advantages because he on the one hand with the wishes of his client was very familiar and on the other hand also could examine the designs of its competitors in detail. Therefore, it is not surprising that the design of Klenze won the tender of the Hall of Fame in March 1834. He planned the Hall of Fame with a Doric portico in the background and a colossal statue in the foreground.

The construction of the Hall of Fame in the years 1843-1853 actually took place according to the planning of Klenze. After completion of the Hall of Fame, in 1853 the busts of 74 especially venerable Bavarians were set up, in 1868 another 10 were added. The bust of King Ludwig I was only in 1888 in the Hall of Fame erected to commemorate his 100th birthday and supplemented with the following inscription:

"To King Ludwig I to celebrate his 100th birthday, the grateful Munich."

The Hall of Fame itself is 68 meters long, 32 meters wide and stands on a 4.3 meter high pedestal. The roof is supported by the back wall and 48 Doric columns that have a height of about 7 meters and a diameter of 1.25 meters.

Since the Hall of Fame and the in it set up busts in 1944 during an air raid in WW2 were severely damaged, it was not until 1966 when the Bavarian Council of Ministers decided the reconstruction of the Hall of Fame and the continuation of honouring of Bavarian personalities by setting up of their busts. The renovation was completed in 1972 and the Hall of Fame on 26 October 1972 with the preserved and renovated busts could be reopened.

For the selection of the personalities the Bavarian Council of Ministers is responsible, which is advised by a committee of experts from the Bavarian Ministry of Culture, the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts, the Bavarian Academy of Sciences, the Bavarian Palace Department, the House of Bavarian History, the Bavarian Ministry of Finance and the LMU (Ludwig Maximilian University).

The colossal statue of Bavaria forms an artistic unity with the Hall of Fame in the background. The first sketches of Bavaria von Klenze already in his design of the whole ensemble on the model of ancient colossal statues of antiquity had produced. It was modeled after the Colossus of Rhodes, the statue of Zeus of Phidias and especially the Athena Parthenos. Theoretically, it is even possible that a part of the bronze for the Bavaria was once part of the Colossus of Rhodes. After Klenze was awarded the contract for the construction of the ensemble consisting of Hall of Fame and Bavaria, he made more sketches on the Greek model.

Since the statue should be cast according to both of Klenze`s ideas and Ludwig`s wishes in bronze, he included the sculptor Ludwig Schwanthaler, the ore caster Johann Baptist Stiglmaier as well as whose nephew Ferdinand von Miller in the further design and manufacture of the Bavaria statue. While Schwanthaler with his first sketches still held to the classical model in the sense of Klenze, he gave the statue in the further course of his designs increasingly a "Germanic" appearance with typical "German" character. The head and the raised hand he adorned with a wreath of oak and at her side appeared the drawn sword as a sign of her ability to defend herself. At her feet placed Schwanthaler a lion, that always have served as heraldic animal of the Wittelsbach.

The manufacturing of the final designs for the Bavaria statue followed in the years 1839 to 1843. Schwanthaler however the beginning of the foundry did not live because he shortly before that died in April 1844. As first thing, the head of Bavaria was cast in September 1844, in January and March 1845 followed the arms, on 11 October 1845, the breast piece. The last major casting for the bottom part took place on 1 December 1849. The erection and unveiling of Bavaria occurred during Oktoberfest (Munich Beer Festival) 1850. The cost for the production of the statue Ludwig after his abdication as king of Bavaria on 20 March 1848 largely paid from private sources. A special feature of Bavaria is the spiral staircase in its interior, where you can climb up into her head to enjoy from there an incomparable view of the Oktoberfest.


Photo, Print, Drawing Statue of Bavaria and Hall of Fame, Munich, Bavaria

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Main information:

The Bavarian Administration of Palaces, Gardens and Lakes, otherwise known as the Bavarian Palace Administration, is one of the most traditional administrative departments in the Free State of Bavaria. Created as part of the administration at the court of the electors and kings, it is today one of the largest public authorities responsible for museums in Germany. It is also responsible for a very special historical heritage: the many magnificent court gardens, palace parks, gardens and lakes.

Because of its origins in the court, the Bavarian Palace Administration looks after the palaces and residences of the civil list which remained after the former royal family was no longer in power. In addition, however, it has gradually taken over a number of other properties, so that it is currently represented in each of the seven regions of Bavaria with 45 palaces, castles and residences as well as further monuments and artists' houses, 32 historic gardens and 21 lakes.

The headquarters of the Bavarian Palace Administration are located in Munich. The general administration of all the property and regulation of all personnel, legal and budgetary matters takes place here. All relevant publications and advertising measures are planned and produced in Munich. Besides, among the staff including specialists in the restoration of the valuable interiors, art historians who are responsible for the museums, building specialists who supervise the rebuilding, restoration and extension of the property in accordance with the principles of preservation, and a garden department which is not only responsible for the maintenance and conservation of the gardens, but also for research into their history.

The external The external administrative offices are the local contacts and are responsible for all matters relating to the most beautiful sights in Bavaria. The tasks of the boards and their staff are very varied. One of their responsibilities is the smooth running of the property as a museum: it is their job to ensure that individual visitors, buses full of tourists from all over the world, school classes and local people are all satisfied with their visit. The external administrators are also responsible for seeing that there are regular guided tours, the tills are manned, museum rooms, cloakrooms and toilets are clean and the attendants are on duty. Together with the art historians of the museum department, they plan and organize their own events such as the Residence Days in Würzburg, long museum nights or Residence Week in Munich.

Many administrative offices are also responsible for historic gardens. Whether they are baroque formal gardens or 19th-century landscape parks, the gardens looked after by the external administrative offices are tourist attractions as well as important recreational areas for the local people.

The 21 lakes looked after by the Bavarian Administration of Palaces, Gardens and Lakes are among this region's main attractions. The three external offices at the Ammersee, Chiemsee and Starnberger See are also responsible for fishing rights, the allocation of mooring buoys and landing stages and rental contracts for boat mooring places.


Main information:

The Bavarian Administration of Palaces, Gardens and Lakes, otherwise known as the Bavarian Palace Administration, is one of the most traditional administrative departments in the Free State of Bavaria. Created as part of the administration at the court of the electors and kings, it is today one of the largest public authorities responsible for museums in Germany. It is also responsible for a very special historical heritage: the many magnificent court gardens, palace parks, gardens and lakes.

Because of its origins in the court, the Bavarian Palace Administration looks after the palaces and residences of the civil list which remained after the former royal family was no longer in power. In addition, however, it has gradually taken over a number of other properties, so that it is currently represented in each of the seven regions of Bavaria with 45 palaces, castles and residences as well as further monuments and artists' houses, 32 historic gardens and 21 lakes.

The headquarters of the Bavarian Palace Administration are located in Munich. The general administration of all the property and regulation of all personnel, legal and budgetary matters takes place here. All relevant publications and advertising measures are planned and produced in Munich. Besides, among the staff including specialists in the restoration of the valuable interiors, art historians who are responsible for the museums, building specialists who supervise the rebuilding, restoration and extension of the property in accordance with the principles of preservation, and a garden department which is not only responsible for the maintenance and conservation of the gardens, but also for research into their history.

The external The external administrative offices are the local contacts and are responsible for all matters relating to the most beautiful sights in Bavaria. The tasks of the boards and their staff are very varied. One of their responsibilities is the smooth running of the property as a museum: it is their job to ensure that individual visitors, buses full of tourists from all over the world, school classes and local people are all satisfied with their visit. The external administrators are also responsible for seeing that there are regular guided tours, the tills are manned, museum rooms, cloakrooms and toilets are clean and the attendants are on duty. Together with the art historians of the museum department, they plan and organize their own events such as the Residence Days in Würzburg, long museum nights or Residence Week in Munich.

Many administrative offices are also responsible for historic gardens. Whether they are baroque formal gardens or 19th-century landscape parks, the gardens looked after by the external administrative offices are tourist attractions as well as important recreational areas for the local people.

The 21 lakes looked after by the Bavarian Administration of Palaces, Gardens and Lakes are among this region's main attractions. The three external offices at the Ammersee, Chiemsee and Starnberger See are also responsible for fishing rights, the allocation of mooring buoys and landing stages and rental contracts for boat mooring places.


Main information:

The Bavarian Administration of Palaces, Gardens and Lakes, otherwise known as the Bavarian Palace Administration, is one of the most traditional administrative departments in the Free State of Bavaria. Created as part of the administration at the court of the electors and kings, it is today one of the largest public authorities responsible for museums in Germany. It is also responsible for a very special historical heritage: the many magnificent court gardens, palace parks, gardens and lakes.

Because of its origins in the court, the Bavarian Palace Administration looks after the palaces and residences of the civil list which remained after the former royal family was no longer in power. In addition, however, it has gradually taken over a number of other properties, so that it is currently represented in each of the seven regions of Bavaria with 45 palaces, castles and residences as well as further monuments and artists' houses, 32 historic gardens and 21 lakes.

The headquarters of the Bavarian Palace Administration are located in Munich. The general administration of all the property and regulation of all personnel, legal and budgetary matters takes place here. All relevant publications and advertising measures are planned and produced in Munich. Besides, among the staff including specialists in the restoration of the valuable interiors, art historians who are responsible for the museums, building specialists who supervise the rebuilding, restoration and extension of the property in accordance with the principles of preservation, and a garden department which is not only responsible for the maintenance and conservation of the gardens, but also for research into their history.

The external The external administrative offices are the local contacts and are responsible for all matters relating to the most beautiful sights in Bavaria. The tasks of the boards and their staff are very varied. One of their responsibilities is the smooth running of the property as a museum: it is their job to ensure that individual visitors, buses full of tourists from all over the world, school classes and local people are all satisfied with their visit. The external administrators are also responsible for seeing that there are regular guided tours, the tills are manned, museum rooms, cloakrooms and toilets are clean and the attendants are on duty. Together with the art historians of the museum department, they plan and organize their own events such as the Residence Days in Würzburg, long museum nights or Residence Week in Munich.

Many administrative offices are also responsible for historic gardens. Whether they are baroque formal gardens or 19th-century landscape parks, the gardens looked after by the external administrative offices are tourist attractions as well as important recreational areas for the local people.

The 21 lakes looked after by the Bavarian Administration of Palaces, Gardens and Lakes are among this region's main attractions. The three external offices at the Ammersee, Chiemsee and Starnberger See are also responsible for fishing rights, the allocation of mooring buoys and landing stages and rental contracts for boat mooring places.


Symbol of Bavaria and Hall of Fame

The magnificient 70 tons and 18 metre bronze lady statue is said to be a symbol and guardian of Bavaria. There is a spiral staircase inside the body which leads up to a narrow viewing platform at the head of the statue for a view of the Theresiawiesen fairground where major events in Munich including the well known annual Oktoberfest is held. Behind the Lady Statue is the Hall of Fame where busts of well known Bavarian figures are honoured.

Seeing the Bavaria statue standing on her pedestal is quite impressive, she was made about 40 years before the Statue Of Liberty. She's standing next to a lion holding a laurel wreth. I was there too early so could't go up to the head. It was great to see but other people might just see it as another statue. If you have the time, go and see it.

After visiting the Oktoberfest we climbed up to this statue. Very nice view over the whole Theresienwiese area!

Walking around octoberfest, you come to this grand statue. In the back right corner of the festival.. A must to view. If you do not have a reservation, don't worry. Get up early. I traveled from Freising by train, left at 7am arrived and Munich station at 7:30 walked to festival was there by 8am. Short walk. vendors were setting up. beer tents stocking up. people start lining up for a unreserved table at 8:30am. 1st day is 12 noon for opening beer tents, they wait for the mayor of munich to open the 1st keg. the rest of the days are 9am.. We found a table, you can pretty much pick your table. Drank until 2pm.. 5 liters.. you feel bavarian. The reserved tables start at 3pm.

While there are many statues that dot Munich this is one of the more impressive. At certain times (I could not decipher when) there is the ability to go to the top of the statue. This will give you a view of the platz where Oktoberfest takes place.

There are also many busts of famous Bavarians behind the statue.

I would make this a place to visit during morning hours as the sun is against you in the evening for photos leaving a dark outline visible only for the evening


Watch the video: Hall of Fame 2018