Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum

Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum


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The Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum is located on Chestnut Avenue in Old Town Bowie, Maryland. A division of the City of Bowie Museums, it captures a moment in Bowie's turn of the 20th-century history.The existing museum buildings were relocated from its original site across the railroad tracks and restored in the 1990s. The Maryland Historical Society and the City of Bowie maintain these structures.The first station was built in 1872 by the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Company at the junction of rail lines into Washington, D.C. and Southern Maryland.The rail lines were later owned by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company system. The bustling town of Bowie, originally Huntington City, emerged around this train station.The museum now houses three railroad structures - the switch tower, freight depot, and waiting shed. The recent addition to the site was a caboose from Allen Pond Park in Bowie, in March 2000.The freight depot and the first floor of the switch tower have a collection of railroad artifacts and historical photographs. From the second floor of the tower, visitors can watch the parade of operating Amtrak and MARC trains.


Bowie, Maryland

Bowie ( / ˈ b uː i / ) is a city in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. [5] The population was 54,727 at the 2010 U.S. Census. Bowie has grown from a small railroad stop to the largest municipality in Prince George's County, and the fifth most populous city [6] and third largest city by area in the U.S. state of Maryland. In 2014, CNN Money ranked Bowie 28th in its Best Places to Live (in the United States) list. [7]


Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum - History

Location / Name:
Bowie MD, Prince George's County

What's Here:
Huntington (Bowie) Railroad Museum
Amtrak Northeast Corridor
Wye
The Pope's Creek Branch

Data:
GPS Coordinates: 39.007123, -76.779156 (museum)
Phone A/C: 301
ZIP: 20715

Access by train/transit:
Bowie State MARC station if 1.1 miles north

This guide covers Bowie MD, a town on the old Pennsy mainline, now the Northeast Corridor. Bowie is Maryland's third largest incorporated city.

Bowie has a MARC station, kinda, it's a little north at Bowie State University. The next station going south is Seabrook.

Bowie is home to the Bowie RR Museum, AKA the Huntington RR Museum , and is centered around the old Pennsylvania Railroad Bowie tower and depot.

The Pope's Creek Branch splits off from the NEC in Bowie, and heads south to a couple of power plants. Back in the Pennsy, then PC, then Conrail days, the coal used come to the branch via Harrisburg PA and the Port Road down to Perryville MD, where it would head south to Bowie. Since CSX assumed control of the branch after the Conrail split-up in 1999, the coal has come from the south. Via CSX's Benning Yard on the east side of Washington DC, along MD 295 at US 50.

The interlocking was changed in 1984 to accommodate the southbound freights, that is also probably when the NB signals were moved south.

Signals around here are all Pennsylvania Railroad PL (position light) style signals, altho the ones of the corridor have been converted to colorized versions of them, and are usually referred to PCL's (Position Color Lights) to differentiate them from the B&O CPL's (Color Position Lights). One signal remains in it's original Pennsy form is the caution signal a few blocks down the Pope's Creek branch at Highbridge Street, and is a permanent all yellow Caution signal for the approach to the Wye.

For some interesting reading, here is a link to a study by the state on extending passenger service south from Bowie.

Acknowledgements:
Ric Carter
Denver Todd

Websites and other additional information sources of interest for the area:
http://www.trainweb.org/oldmainline/misc1.htm Additional pictures of stuff around Bowie
http://www.trainweb.org/oldmainline/pa1.htm Pennsy's route from Washington to Baltimore
http://www.trainweb.org/oldmainline/ Index page

There are two fairly easy ways to get to Bowie. One is coming from either I-95 or the Baltimore-Washington Parkway from the west of Bowie via MD197. The other way is getting off the Capitol Beltway (I-495/I-95) at exit 20, the MD450 exit, and then look for the signs for MD564.

For the above map in PDF format, click here

Huntington Railroad Museum

GPS Coordinates: 39.007124, -76779157
For more info: http://wx2dx.net/rrmuseum/rr.html

In the aerial view below, the green arrow points to the museum, which used to be the Bowie station until around 1989 when it was moved here. The museum is named after the original name for the town before it was renamed to Bowie in honor of the PB&W president of the same name.

The red arrow points to where the tower used to be. The blue arrow points to where it is today.

Across the tracks from the dwarf PL signal is where the last Bowie "station" used to be, which can be seen in Jim's pictures below.

The pictures are courtesy Jim Nowotarski, and are from the mid 1970's. Many thanks to Jim for sending these to me!

Notice the NB signals in Jim's pictures were moved south about 1500ft or so.

The current pictures are from March 2012.

Bowie State MARC Station

GPS Coordinates: 39.020754, -76762070

This station replaced the "old" Bowie station in 1989. Not many colleges can claim a train stop on their campus!

These are taken from the grounds of the museum.


This dwarf PL signal controls the branch line traffic onto the NB mainline.

Photo by Ric Carter

Photo by Ric Carter


NB Pennsy PL Style Signal

GPS Coordinates: 38.994101, -76.774732

This signal displays a single, lone indication: Caution, in advance of the wye. It is located on the north side of the Highbridge Road grade crossing.
Even though CSX now runs trains on the branch, since this track was once a Pennsy track, it retained this PL type signal.

I love trains, and I love signals. I am not an expert. My webpages reflect what I find on the topic of the page. This is something I have fun with while trying to help others.

Please Note: Since the main focus of my two websites is railroad signals, the railfan guides are oriented towards the signal fan being able to locate them. For those of you into the modeling aspect of our hobby, my indexa page has a list of almost everything railroad oriented I can think of to provide you with at least a few pictures to help you detail your pike.

If this is a railfan page, every effort has been made to make sure that the information contained on this map and in this railfan guide is correct. Once in a while, an error may creep in :-)

My philosophy: Pictures and maps are worth a thousand words, especially for railfanning. Text descriptions only get you so far, especially if you get lost or disoriented. Take along good maps. a GPS is OK to get somewhere, but maps are still better if you get lost! I belong to AAA, which allows you to get local maps for free when you visit the local branches. ADC puts out a nice series of county maps for the Washington DC area, but their state maps do not have the railroads on them. If you can find em, I like the National Geographic map book of the U.S. good, clear, and concise graphics, and they do a really good job of showing you where tourist type attractions are, although they too lack the railroads. Other notes about specific areas will show up on that page if known.

BTW, floobydust is a term I picked up 30-40 years ago from a National Semiconductor data book, and means miscellaneous and/or other stuff.

Aerial shots were taken from either Google Maps or www.bing.com/maps as noted. Screen captures are made with Snagit , a Techsmith product. a great tool if you have never used it!

Pictures and additional information is always needed if anyone feels inclined to take 'em, send 'em, and share 'em, or if you have something to add or correct. credit is always given! BE NICE. Contact info is here

Beware: If used as a source, ANYTHING from Wikipedia must be treated as being possibly being inaccurate, wrong, or not true.


Bowie's rural roots offer visitors a peek into the area's past

Bowie has come a long way from its days as a rural railroad station on the line between Washington and Southern Maryland.

The area was originally part of 10,000 acres deeded to Lord Calvert in 1658. The acreage - later christened Belair - was purchased by provincial Gov. Samuel Ogle, who established his estate and racehorse stables there in 1743.

In the 1870s, the railroad came to this rural area, known as Huntington. The train station and later the town were named in honor of local resident and Gov. Oden Bowie.

In 1898, New York horse breeder William Woodward bought Belair and re-established the thoroughbred stables there. The nearby Bowie Race Course was built in 1914 as a way for Woodward to showcase his prized horses. (The track later became a training facility.)

Though the railroad brought visitors and commerce to Bowie, and the racetrack and Woodward's horses brought national acclaim, the city was still largely a rural outpost until the 1960s. That's when 2,000 acres of the Belair Estate were sold. Developers long aware of Bowie's proximity to Washington (12 miles), Annapolis (15 miles) and Baltimore (20 miles) - began building houses, and a bedroom community was born.

Today, Bowie is the largest municipality in Prince George's County and the fourth-largest city in Maryland. It's home to 50,000 residents, almost 2,000 acres of parks and open space and museums, sports venues and shopping areas.

The mansion and stable were donated to the city by developers in 1964. The city also runs the railroad station museum. (Unless otherwise noted, the city-owned museums are open noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday or by appointment for groups of 10 or more.)

Bowie is also home to the Bowie Baysox, the Class AA affiliate of the Baltimore Orioles.

Belair Mansion (12207 Tulip Grove Drive, 301-809-3089): Built in 1745 as the Colonial estate of Ogle, Belair also became the home of Ogle's son, Gov. Benjamin Ogle. Later purchased by Woodward, the mansion was enlarged in 1914. The Georgian-style buildings have been restored, and the estate is on the National Register of Historic Places. The museum's collection includes paintings given to the Ogle family from Lord Baltimore, engraved silver, furnishings and other items. The museum's popular teas include mansion tours. The next tea is a Valentine's Day event, Feb. 13. Call for reservations.

Belair Stable Museum (2835 Belair Drive, 301-809-3088): From the 1930s through the 1950s, Woodward operated one of the country's top racing stables at Belair. The stable produced Gallant Fox and Omaha, father and son Triple Crown champions. Belair was also home to Nashua, the 1955 "Horse of the Year." When the stable closed in 1957, it was the oldest continually operated horse farm in the United States that was still raising horses for racing. Some racing enthusiasts believe even today that the Belair bloodlines can be traced in every noted American racing thoroughbred.

Bowie Ice Arena (3330 Northview Drive, 301-809-3090): Home to a hockey club, a figure-skating club, a high school hockey team and the Washington Junior Nationals hockey team, as well as a regular schedule of lessons and private training, the arena also holds daily public ice-skating sessions. Don't miss the family public sessions - up to five members of the same family skate for just $12 plus skate rental. There are also regularly scheduled pickup hockey and figure-skating sessions. The Hockey Club's annual tournaments are this month and next month. The Figure Skating ISI Valentine's Invitational is Feb. 13.

Bowie Playhouse (6314 Crain Highway in Whitemarsh Park, 301-262-6200): The playhouse is home to two permanent production companies. 2nd Star Productions will open the Marx Brothers farce Room Service on Feb. 25. A children's show, not yet announced, will be staged in March. The Bowie Community Theatre will offer An Inspector Calls by J.B. Priestly in April.

Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum (8614 Chestnut Ave., 301-809-3089): In 1872, the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad built the first railroad station as part of its lines between Washington and Southern Maryland. The buildings that house the museum were built in the early 1900s and later restored and moved to the museum's present location.

Freeway Airport (Church Road off Route 450, 410-792-0380): An introductory flight lesson with a Federal Aviation Administration-certified instructor costs $60. If you let them know when you're booking, you can bring a friend along for the ride. Freeway offers lessons and certification as well as a two- and four-year degree program in conjunction with Community College of Baltimore County, Catonsville. Plane rentals are available. Some pilots offer sightseeing flights by appointment.

Radio and Television Museum (2608 Mitchellville Road, 301-390-1020): Radio from the crystal sets of the 1920s and the earliest televisions. The vast collection of artifacts is displayed at Harmel House, home to one of the first Jewish and later African-American businesses in the area. Open 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

Retro Tea and Gifts (13015 Ninth St., 877-708-7387): Enjoy tea or lunch at this tea-themed antique and gift shop in the Bowie Antique Depot. Open Thursday through Sunday afternoons. Reservations recommended.

Rip's Country Inn (3809 Crain Highway, 301-805-8901): Homestyle favorites including steak, seafood and chicken at a combination restaurant-hotel-liquor store that's a local landmark.

Tia's Tex-Mex (16461 Excalibur Road, 301-805-2286): Margaritas, fajitas and more. This Texas-based chain has only one other Maryland location.

Old Town Bowie (Ninth, 10th and 11th streets and Chestnut Avenue): Antiques shops abound. There are also other small businesses in this revitalized section of town.

Bowie Town Center (Route 197 and Northview Drive, 301-860-1818): Promenade-style shopping center that offers more than 50 national chain stores, a nine-stand food court and a number of restaurants, including DuClaw Brewing Co. and Olive Garden.

Take Interstate 97 South to Route 3 South. Follow to a right on Route 450 West. Continue to Route 197 (Collington Road). Route 197 leads to historic Bowie. The mansion and other attractions are off Route 197.


Bowie's rural roots offer visitors a peek into the area's past

The area was originally part of 10,000 acres deeded to Lord Calvert in 1658. The acreage - later christened Belair - was purchased by provincial Gov. Samuel Ogle, who established his estate and racehorse stables there in 1743.

In the 1870s, the railroad came to this rural area, known as Huntington. The train station and later the town were named in honor of local resident and Gov. Oden Bowie.

In 1898, New York horse breeder William Woodward bought Belair and re-established the thoroughbred stables there. The nearby Bowie Race Course was built in 1914 as a way for Woodward to showcase his prized horses. (The track later became a training facility.)

Though the railroad brought visitors and commerce to Bowie, and the racetrack and Woodward's horses brought national acclaim, the city was still largely a rural outpost until the 1960s. That's when 2,000 acres of the Belair Estate were sold. Developers long aware of Bowie's proximity to Washington (12 miles), Annapolis (15 miles) and Baltimore (20 miles) - began building houses, and a bedroom community was born.

Today, Bowie is the largest municipality in Prince George's County and the fourth-largest city in Maryland. It's home to 50,000 residents, almost 2,000 acres of parks and open space and museums, sports venues and shopping areas.

The mansion and stable were donated to the city by developers in 1964. The city also runs the railroad station museum. (Unless otherwise noted, the city-owned museums are open noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday or by appointment for groups of 10 or more.)

Bowie is also home to the Bowie Baysox, the Class AA affiliate of the Baltimore Orioles.

Belair Mansion (12207 Tulip Grove Drive, 301-809-3089): Built in 1745 as the Colonial estate of Ogle, Belair also became the home of Ogle's son, Gov. Benjamin Ogle. Later purchased by Woodward, the mansion was enlarged in 1914. The Georgian-style buildings have been restored, and the estate is on the National Register of Historic Places. The museum's collection includes paintings given to the Ogle family from Lord Baltimore, engraved silver, furnishings and other items. The museum's popular teas include mansion tours. The next tea is a Valentine's Day event, Feb. 13. Call for reservations.

Belair Stable Museum (2835 Belair Drive, 301-809-3088): From the 1930s through the 1950s, Woodward operated one of the country's top racing stables at Belair. The stable produced Gallant Fox and Omaha, father and son Triple Crown champions. Belair was also home to Nashua, the 1955 "Horse of the Year." When the stable closed in 1957, it was the oldest continually operated horse farm in the United States that was still raising horses for racing. Some racing enthusiasts believe even today that the Belair bloodlines can be traced in every noted American racing thoroughbred.

Bowie Ice Arena (3330 Northview Drive, 301-809-3090): Home to a hockey club, a figure-skating club, a high school hockey team and the Washington Junior Nationals hockey team, as well as a regular schedule of lessons and private training, the arena also holds daily public ice-skating sessions. Don't miss the family public sessions - up to five members of the same family skate for just $12 plus skate rental. There are also regularly scheduled pickup hockey and figure-skating sessions. The Hockey Club's annual tournaments are this month and next month. The Figure Skating ISI Valentine's Invitational is Feb. 13.

Bowie Playhouse (6314 Crain Highway in Whitemarsh Park, 301-262-6200): The playhouse is home to two permanent production companies. 2nd Star Productions will open the Marx Brothers farce Room Service on Feb. 25. A children's show, not yet announced, will be staged in March. The Bowie Community Theatre will offer An Inspector Calls by J.B. Priestly in April.

Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum (8614 Chestnut Ave., 301-809-3089): In 1872, the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad built the first railroad station as part of its lines between Washington and Southern Maryland. The buildings that house the museum were built in the early 1900s and later restored and moved to the museum's present location.

Freeway Airport (Church Road off Route 450, 410-792-0380): An introductory flight lesson with a Federal Aviation Administration-certified instructor costs $60. If you let them know when you're booking, you can bring a friend along for the ride. Freeway offers lessons and certification as well as a two- and four-year degree program in conjunction with Community College of Baltimore County , Catonsville. Plane rentals are available. Some pilots offer sightseeing flights by appointment.

Radio and Television Museum (2608 Mitchellville Road, 301-390-1020): Radio from the crystal sets of the 1920s and the earliest televisions. The vast collection of artifacts is displayed at Harmel House, home to one of the first Jewish and later African-American businesses in the area. Open 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

Retro Tea and Gifts (13015 Ninth St., 877-708-7387): Enjoy tea or lunch at this tea-themed antique and gift shop in the Bowie Antique Depot. Open Thursday through Sunday afternoons. Reservations recommended.

Rip's Country Inn (3809 Crain Highway, 301-805-8901): Homestyle favorites including steak, seafood and chicken at a combination restaurant-hotel-liquor store that's a local landmark.

Tia's Tex-Mex (16461 Excalibur Road, 301-805-2286): Margaritas, fajitas and more. This Texas-based chain has only one other Maryland location.

Old Town Bowie (Ninth, 10th and 11th streets and Chestnut Avenue): Antiques shops abound. There are also other small businesses in this revitalized section of town.

Bowie Town Center (Route 197 and Northview Drive, 301-860-1818): Promenade-style shopping center that offers more than 50 national chain stores, a nine-stand food court and a number of restaurants, including DuClaw Brewing Co. and Olive Garden.

Take Interstate 97 South to Route 3 South. Follow to a right on Route 450 West. Continue to Route 197 (Collington Road). Route 197 leads to historic Bowie. The mansion and other attractions are off Route 197.


Street Smart: Bowie

Built atop tobacco fields, once called Huntington City, Bowie was renamed by a grateful citizenry to honor Gov. Oden Bowie, whose Baltimore & Potomac Railroad started operating in 1872. Decades after the trains began, Levitt and Sons’ ranchers and Cape Cods gave Bowie its quintessential suburban look.

Built about 1745, the Georgian-style mansion was occupied by Samuel Ogle (1694-1752), three-time governor of Maryland when it was still a British colony, and later his son Benjamin, who governed Maryland when it was a state.
“On the back side is this tremendous hill” perfect for sledding, says Bob Peirce, 52, a Bowie native. “It could be, though, that now that I’m 6-4 instead of 5 feet , it’s really not that big.”

After the cafeteria at Bowie High School next door proved insufficient to accommodate fans of now-retired drama teacher Eleanor Minor’s stunning productions, the center inched closer to reality because of volunteer fundraisers. “Not one penny [of the target $11 million] came from the school system,” says Mary Nusser, the center’s outreach coordinator and Class of 1973. Pictured, Bowie High grad Kiah Victoria, who has performed at the center.

“Bowie was born on the railroad,” says Pamela L. Williams, manager of the city’s historic properties. The outbreak of the Civil War slowed negotiations between the Bowie family and the Huntington town fathers, but track was eventually laid for what would be the first train service between Baltimore and Washington.

Husband and wife Bob, pictured at top, and Theresa “Mama T” Thompson purchased the former Odd Fellows Hall, established in 1932, nearly a decade ago. Serving cream of crab soup and Delmonico steaks since 2006, the Grille also hosts bands multiple nights a week.

“I can buy antiques in German, Russian, Spanish, Farsi, Japanese and English,” says proprietor Al Jacobs, 84, pictured above. The retired Army colonel and National Security Agency linguist was stationed abroad with wife Mille, 86, and six children. “Once we had the largest selection of stained glass on the East Coast,” sourced from banks, castles and other sites, with pieces dating between 1860 and 1890, he says. “Bowie is home, but we’ve been to England 87 times.”


Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum - History

Our library is located in the base of the former Pennsylvania Railroad Interlocking Tower (Bowie Tower) located at 8614 Chestnut Avenue in historic Old Bowie, Maryland. The Tower is part of the Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum which is operated by the City of Bowie, Maryland.

For a map and/or step by step directions, click here to use Google maps!

This is a fitting home for a railroad library, a former railroad interlocking tower next to a very busy railroad line. The Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Company built the first station here in 1872 at the junction of rail lines into Washington, D.C. and Southern Maryland. The lines were later integrated into the Pennsylvania Railroad system. The Town of Bowie (originally Huntington City) grew up around the train station. The existing museum buildings were constructed in the early 1900's by the Pennsylvania Railroad, The tower, manned by an operator, controlled the switches at this important railroad junction. The tower closed in 1989 when control of the junction was remoted to a central location by the railroad. This tower and station were originally located just southeast of their present location, between the tracks of what is now Amtrak's Northeast Corridor and the CSX "Pope's Creek" branch line. These buildings were moved to this location in the early 1990s by the City of Bowie.

The library is on the first floor of the tower and is open to the public Tuesday - Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and for groups of 10 or more by appointment. For additional information, or to schedule a group tour, call 301-809-3089.

To ensure the integrity of the collection, a driver's license or other form of government issued identification may be required to gain access to the collection.

If you arrive at the museum and find the door to the library locked, please inquire at the nearby Visitor's Center for access.

Restrooms are available in the Visitor's Center. There are a couple of locations nearby in old town to catch lunch at.

No food or drink is permitted in the facility other than small bottles of water.


** Photo by Stephen Patrick


Bowie Railroad Museum

Henry Adams provided building assessments for the historic Bowie Railroad Museum which consists of: a 1-story brick office, a 1-story frame depot building, a small 2-story frame tower and a passenger waiting shed. Henry Adams also provided a conditions assessment report and preventative maintenance recommendations for items visually identified during the site visit that were in need of maintenance.

After the Civil War, two major railroads were developed traveling to Washington, DC and Southern Maryland. The Bowie Station served as the junction between the two lines. The station's central location quickly grew popular and thus a city was formed around it.

While the railroad remains in use today, the station has not been since 1989. In 1991, Bowie purchased the buildings and moved them about 50 feet from their original location to a new foundation. In addition to the move, clapboard siding was uncovered and painted gray with dark red trim to match an earlier color scheme. (A fire destroyed most of the district in 1910 the depot structures were rebuilt in the early 20th century.). In 1994, the station buildings were declared a museum.

Today, visitors can walk through the passenger depot, hang out in the tower or tour an authentic caboose donated to the museum. The museum hosts several festivals a year and an arts and antiques expo. It is open the fourth Sunday of every month from April through October and also opens for group tours of 10 or more by appointment. Guided tours begin in the passenger waiting room with its potbelly stove, and move through the ticket master's office into the freight room, which contains railroad artifacts: steam gauges, lanterns and signals. Some say this train station is a "must-see" destination in Bowie.


Learn About The History Of Bowie Md

Situated in the center of Maryland State, Bowie is a city in Prince George's County, of the United States of America. Governor Samuel Ogle in 1745 built Belair estate that brought a significant settlement named Huntington. The rich soil in the area turned it a prime location for both food crops and tobacco production. Later in 1870, the site was chosen as a major rail junction. As of 2016, the area had a population of 58393 people making it the largest municipality in Prince George's County and the third largest city in the US state of Maryland.

The Origin of the name Bowie

Initially, Bowie was called Huntington, but later the station was named Bowie in honor of Oden Bowie who was the president of the railroad and governor of Maryland between 1869 to 1872. It began as a small train stop of the Annapolis and Elk Ridge Railroad and Potomac and Baltimore Railroad, but over the years, it has developed and grown to be the largest municipality in Prince George's County.

The economy

Bowie economy was depending on agriculture and slavery. The area had small farms and large tobacco plantation. In addition to the economy of the area was the region's proximity to Baltimore and Washington, D.C. However, in 1910 the station building was destroyed by the fire but was later rebuilt. Bowie is also known for having the largest number of museums. One of the most known sites is the Belair Mansion.

Early years

The Beliar Mansion was in Belair Estate, which was originally owned by Robert Carville of St. Mary's city. The property had grown from five hundred acre tract to 1410 acres when owned by Reverend Mr. Jacob Henderson who changed the name from Catton to Beliar. Later he sold it to Governor Samuel Ogle, and his son Governor Benjamin Ogle. Later James T. Woodward who was a wealthy banker bought the estate in 1898. Unfortunately, he passed on and left it to his nephew William Woodward, Sr, who became known for breeding racing horses. Unfortunately, it was closed following the death of his son. Nevertheless, it remains the oldest continually operating a thoroughbred horse farm in the country.

Development during and after the civil war

Bowie was directly between two great cities of Baltimore and Washington, D.C. making it develop naturally because of transportation issue surrounding it. It had the center on developing a railroad into the part of the county that extended into southern Maryland. Luckily, Col. William D. Bowie in 1853 he managed to convince the Maryland Legislature to charter the Potomac and Baltimore Railroad Company designed to serve Southern Maryland. Unfortunately, the plans were delayed by civil war. After the War Between the States, Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Company gained power in the Pennsylvania Railroad. They were allowed to build the long-sought line into southern Maryland.

The takeaway

Initial Bowie MD was a patchwork of farm and village but now is a vibrant city, with numerous developed projects turning it into a modern city. In addition, its heritage and history are still very rich and worth for visitor to visit and learn more about it.


THE CITY OF BOWIE, MARYLAND

BACKGROUND


A. SCOPE OF THE INVESTIGATION

The United States Department of Justice ("Department ") initiated this matter as a compliance review of the City of Bowie, Maryland ("City"), under title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ("ADA"), 42 U.S.C. §§ 12131-12134, and the Department’s implementing regulation, 28 C.F.R. Part 35.

The review was conducted by the Disability Rights Section of the Department’s Civil Rights Division and focused on the City’s compliance with the following title II requirements:

    to conduct a self-evaluation of its services, policies, and practices by July 26, 1992, and make modifications necessary to comply with the Department’s title II regulation (28 C.F.R. Part 35), 28 C.F.R. § 35.105

The Department reviewed the following City facilities to determine compliance with the requirements of the ADA regulations and the Standards: City Hall, Belair Mansion, Belair Stable Museum, Sport Fit-Total Fitness Club, Whitemarsh Football Field, Bowie Playhouse, Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum, Harmel House (Radio & TV Museum), Allen Pond Park, Bowie Ice Arena, Blacksox Park, Bowie Golf and Country Club, City of Bowie Skateboard Park, City of Bowie Museums, and Prince George’s County Genealogical Library. The Department also reviewed the accessibility of the following City polling locations: Bowie Community Center, Cerebral Palsy Center, and City Hall.

1. The ADA applies to the City because it is a "public entity" as defined by title II. 42 U.S.C. § 12131(1).

2. The Department is authorized to conduct this compliance review under 42 U.S.C. § 12133 in order to determine the City’s compliance with title II and the Department’s implementing title II regulation, to issue findings and, where appropriate, to negotiate and secure a voluntary compliance agreement. Furthermore, the Attorney General is authorized, under 42 U.S.C. § 12133, to bring a civil action enforcing title II of the ADA should the Department fail to secure voluntary compliance.

C. ACTIONS TAKEN BY THE CITY

3. The City conducted a self-evaluation in 1992 and developed a transition plan in 1993. The City appointed an ADA Coordinator and reviewed its employment practices in 1992. Many of the programs, services and activities operated by the City are accessible to individuals with disabilities. The following are noteworthy: the playground areas at Opportunity Park are accessible to small children who use wheelchairs and those with visual impairments an accessible ramp leads to the accessible seats in the spectators’ stand at the Bowie Ice Arena the fishing pier at Allen Pond Park is accessible and an elevator was installed in the historic Belair Mansion that allows access to the second floor of the mansion by individuals with mobility impairments.

The parties to this Agreement are the United States of America and the City of Bowie, Maryland. In order to avoid the burdens and expense of an investigation and possible litigation, the parties hereby agree as follows:

4. In consideration of the terms of, and consistent with, this Agreement as set forth below, the Attorney General agrees to refrain from undertaking further investigation or from filing civil suit in this matter regarding the areas covered by the Remedial Action provisions of this Agreement.

5. The Parties agree that the technical requirements and, where appropriate, the scoping requirements of the Standards are used as a guide for determining whether a program or activity held in an existing facility is "readily accessible to and usable by" persons with disabilities, and for determining what changes are necessary to make this program or activity accessible if it continues to be provided in the existing facility in question. See 28 C.F.R. §§ 35.150(b)(1), 35.151. The Standards appear at 28 C.F.R. Part 36, Appendix A.

NEW CONSTRUCTION AND ALTERATIONS

6. City Hall. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that City Hall, in which the restrooms were altered in 1999, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. Parking. No van-accessible space is provided. Provide a van-accessible parking space that meets the requirements of the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.2.(5)(b), 4.6.4.

B. Polling Place. The multi-purpose room in City Hall serves as a polling place for the City. The room has a double-leaf door and each of the leaves is 30 1/2 inches wide. Provide one door leaf with a minimum clear opening of a least 32 inches with the door open 90 degrees, measured between the face of the door and the opposite stop, or ensure that the doors remain propped open during all polling activities and post a permanent sign that meets the requirements of the Standards advising people with disabilities that the ranger is available to open the door. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(7)(b), 4.1.3(16)(b), 4.13.4, 4.13.5, 4.30.2, 4.30.3, 4.30.5.

C. Counters. The top of the service counter at the front desk is 42 inches above the finish floor. The top of the service counter at the finance office is 40 inches above the finish floor. Provide a portion of each counter that is a minimum of 36 inches in length that is a maximum of 36 inches high, or provide an auxiliary counter with a maximum height of 36 inches, or provide access programatically through equivalent facilitation. Standards § 7.2(2).

If the City chooses not to alter the service counters referenced in this paragraph, the City should develop a policy statement that identifies the methods that will be used to ensure that individuals with disabilities are afforded the programs, services and activities that are available at the service counters.

D. Women’s Restroom. The toilet room sign is located on the door instead of on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door. Provide signage with Braille and raised letters on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door so that the centerline of the sign is 60 inches above the finish floor and a person can approach within 3 inches of the sign without encountering protruding objects or standing within the swing of a door. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(16)(a), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

E. Men’s Restroom.

1. The toilet room sign is located on the door instead of on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door. Provide signage with Braille and raised letters on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door so that the centerline of the sign is 60 inches above the finish floor and a person can approach within 3 inches of the sign without encountering protruding objects or standing within the swing of a door. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(16)(a), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

2. The height of the urinal is 19 inches from the elongated rim to the finish floor. Provide a urinal with a rim that is no more than 17 inches above the finish floor. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.18.2, 4.22.5.

F. Council Chambers. The raised area in the council chambers is 12 inches above the finish floor. The raised area is for council members only and there are no members who currently use a wheelchair. Develop a policy to ensure that the raised area in the council chamber will be made accessible or the meetings will be relocated to an accessible location when access to the raised area is requested by a council member with a mobility impairment. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(1), 4.3, 4.5.2, 4.8.

G. TTY Number. The City has a telephone number for individuals who use TTY’s but does not list this number in its Employee Handbook, City Museum brochure or newsletter. Revise these documents to list the City’s TTY number. 28 C.F.R. § 35.160.

7. Skateboard Park. The City is considering closing Skateboard Park. If the City chooses not to close Skateboard Park, the City shall correct the following within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement to ensure that Skateboard Park, which was constructed in 1998, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. Parking. No accessible parking space is provided. Provide a van-accessible parking space that meets the requirements of the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.2(5), 4.6.

B. Accessible Route. There is a change in level at the entrance that exceeds the maximum _ inch height allowed and is not beveled to a slope no greater than 1:2. Modify the accessible route at the entrance to comply with the Standards for an accessible route. Standards §§ 4.1.2(1), 4.3.8, 4.5.2.

8. Bowie Golf and Country Club. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that the Bowie Golf and Country Club, which was altered in 1994, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. ADA Notice. There is an ADA notice posted that states that "if you have a disability and/or proof thereof, kindly inform the staff within the pro-shop so that you can be provided whatever assistance that’s necessary." Remove or reword this notice so as not to imply that people with disabilities are required to divulge their disabilities or proof thereof. 28 C.F.R. §§ 35.130(b)(3)(i), 35.130(b)(7).

B. Parking.

1. No van accessible space is provided. Provide a van-accessible parking space that meets the requirements of the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5)(b), 4.6.4.

2. The accessible parking spaces in the main parking lot are not located on the shortest accessible route of travel from the adjacent parking to the accessible entrance to the clubhouse. Designate accessible parking spaces near the ramp to the entrance of the clubhouse. Standards § 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5), 4.6.2.

1. There is no directional signage at the inaccessible entrance that indicates the location of the nearest accessible entrance. Provide directional signage at the inaccessible entrance. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(8)(d), 4.30.1, 4.30.2, 4.30.3, 4.30.5.

2. The accessible entrance is not identified with the International Symbol of Accessibility. Provide identifying signage. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.2(7)(c), 4.30.7.

1. The ramp to the accessible entrance to the clubhouse has a rise that is greater than 6 inches but does not have handrails. Provide handrails on both sides of the ramp that comply with the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.2(1), 4.3.8, 4.8.5.

2. The toilet room signs are located on the door instead of on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door. Provide signage with Braille and raised letters on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door so that the centerline of the signs are 60 inches above the finish floor and a person can approach within 3 inches of the signs without encountering protruding objects or standing within the swing of a door. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(16)(a), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

3. The hot water and drain pipes underneath the lavatory are not insulated or otherwise configured to protect against contact. Insulate the pipes under the lavatory. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.6, 4.19.4.

9. Blacksox Park. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that Blacksox Park, which was constructed in 1998, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. Parking. No van-accessible space is provided. Install signage designating a van accessible space. Standards § 4.1.2(5)(b), 4.6.4.

B. Restrooms.

1. The restroom signage is mounted on the restroom doors rather than on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the doors and does not contain Braille or raised letters. Provide signage with Braille and raised letters on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door so that the centerline of the sign is 60 inches above the finish floor and a person can approach within 3 inches of the signs without encountering protruding objects or standing within the swing of a door. Standards §§ 4.1.3(16)(a), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

2. The height of the urinal in the men’s toilet room is 18 inches from the elongated rim to the finish floor. Provide a urinal with a rim that is no more than 17 inches above the finish floor. Standards §§ 4.1.3(11), 4.22.5, 4.18.2.

C. Drinking Fountain. There is a drinking fountain accessible to individuals who use wheelchairs but not one to those who have difficulty bending or stooping. Provide a fountain accessible to individuals who have difficulty bending or stooping. Standards §§ 4.1.3(10)(a), 4.15.

C. Protruding Objects. There are exterior lights located along the wall adjacent
to the restrooms that are mounted below 80 inches above the finish floor and protrude more than 4 inches. Relocate the lights so that they are not protruding objects. Standards §§ 4.1.2(3), 4.4.1.

10. Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that the Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum, which was altered in 1992, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. Parking. No van accessible parking space is provided. Provide a van-accessible parking space that meets the requirements of the Standards. Standards
§§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.2(5)(b), 4.6.

B. Entrance. The threshold at the front doorway to the Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum exceeds the maximum _ inch height allowed and is not beveled to a slope no greater than 1:2. Modify the entrance threshold so that it is accessible. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.3(1), 4.3.8, 4.5.2, 4.13.8.

C. Restroom.

1. There is no signage that designates the accessible unisex toilet room. Provide signage that complies with the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(16)(a), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

2. The unisex toilet room does not have grab bars. Provide side and rear grab bars at the toilet that comply with the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.4, 4.16.4, 4.26, Fig. 29.

3. The mirror in the unisex toilet room is mounted 42 1/2 inches from the finish floor to the bottom edge of the reflecting surface. Provide a mirror that is 40 inches maximum from the finish floor to the bottom edge of the reflecting surface. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.19.6, 4.22.6, Fig. 31.

4. The hot water and drain pipes underneath the lavatory are not insulated or otherwise configured to protect against contact. Insulate the pipes under the lavatory. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.6, 4.19.4.

D. Policy. The railroad tower is not accessible to individuals with mobility impairments. The City will take steps to ensure that the programs, services and activities on the upper level of the tower are available to people with disabilities. 28 C.F.R. § 35.150(b)(2).

11. Harmel House: The Radio and TV Museum. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that Harmel House, which was altered in 1999, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. Parking The access aisles are not demarcated and no van accessible parking space is provided. Provide a van accessible parking space with a 96 inch wide demarcated access aisle and signage that meets the requirements of the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5), 4.6.

B. Accessible Route. There is a 3/4 inch level change on the accessible route to the entrance. Modify the accessible route so that it does not contain changes in level greater than 1/2 inch and so that any changes in level between 1/4 inch and 1/2 inch are beveled with a slope no greater than 1:2. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(1), 4.3.8, 4.5.2.

C. Entrance. The threshold at the front doorway to the Harmel House is 3 1/2 inches and exceeds the maximum 1/2 inch height allowed. Modify the entrance to provide an accessible threshold. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(7)(a), 4.13.8.

D. Signage. There is no accessible signage to designate the men’s and women’s restrooms. Provide signage with Braille and raised letters on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door so that the centerline of the signs are 60 inches above the finish floor. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(16), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

12. Allen Pond Park. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that Allen Pond Park, which was altered in 1994, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. Parking.

1. There are no access aisles provided for the accessible parking spaces. Alter the parking lot to provide access aisles that are at least 60 inches wide. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5), 4.6.3, Fig. 9.

2. No van accessible space is provided. Provide a van accessible parking space that meets the requirements of the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5)(b), 4.6.4.

B. Men’s Restroom Near the Boathouse.

1. There is no signage at the entrance of the men’s restroom. Provide signage that complies with the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(16)(a), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

2. The hot water and drain pipes under the lavatory are not insulated or otherwise configured to protect against contact. Insulate the pipes under the lavatory. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.19.4, 4.22.6.

3. The paper towel dispenser control is 56 inches above the finish floor which exceeds the maximum height allowed of 54 inches to the control when a side reach is provided. Lower the dispenser or provide an additional dispenser at the correct height. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.7, 4.2.6, 4.27.3.

C. Women’s Restroom Near the Boathouse.

1. There is no signage at the entrance of the women’s restroom. Provide signage that complies with the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(16)(a), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

2. The hot water and drain pipe under the lavatory are not insulated or otherwise configured to protect against contact. Insulate the pipes under the lavatory. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.19.4, 4.22.6.

3. The paper towel dispenser control is 56 inches above the finish floor which exceeds the maximum height allowed of 54 inches to the control when a side reach is provided. Lower the dispenser or provide an additional dispenser at the correct height. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.7, 4.2.6, 4.27.3.

D. Women’s Restroom in the Brick Restroom Facility

1. The accessible restroom sign is mounted on the restroom door rather than on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door. Provide signage with Braille and raised letters on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door so that the centerline of the sign is 60 inches above the finish floor and a person can approach within 3 inches of the sign without encountering protruding objects or standing within the swing of a door. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(16)(a), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

2. The stall door has a twist lock that is not accessible. Replace the hardware with hardware that does not require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist to operate. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.4, 4.17.5 4.13.9.

3. The side grab bar is 38 inches long. Provide a side grab bar so that its end nearest the back wall begins no more than 12 inches from the wall, it is at least 40 inches long, and its end farthest from the back wall is located at least 52 inches from the wall. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.4, 4.17.6, Fig. 30.

E. Men’s Restroom in the Brick Restroom Facility

1. The accessible restroom sign is mounted on the restroom door rather than on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door. Provide signage with Braille and raised letters on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door so that the centerline of the sign is 60 inches above the finish floor and a person can approach within 3 inches of the sign without encountering protruding objects or standing within the swing of a door. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(16)(a), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

2. The stall door has a twist lock that is not accessible. Replace the hardware with hardware that does not require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist to operate. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.4, 4.17.5, 4.13.9.

3. The side grab bar is 38 inches long. Provide a side grab bar so that its end nearest the back wall begins no more than 12 inches from the wall, it is at least 40 inches long, and its end farthest from the back wall is located at least 52 inches from the wall. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.4, 4.17.6, Fig. 30.

13. Bowie Ice Arena. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that the Bowie Ice Arena, in Allen Pond Park, which was altered in 1994, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. Women’s Restroom. The coat hook on the accessible stall door is 60 inches high instead of the maximum height allowed of 54 inches for a side reach. Lower the coat hook or provide an additional coat hook at an accessible height. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(12), 4.25.3, 4.2.6.

B. Men’s Restroom. The coat hook on the accessible stall door is 60 inches high instead of the maximum height allowed of 54 inches for a side reach. Lower the coat hook or provide an additional coat hook at an accessible height. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(12), 4.25.3, 4.2.6.

14. Genealogical Library. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that the Genealogical Library, which was altered in 1997, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. Parking

1. There is no signage at the accessible parking space. Provide signage that complies with the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5), 4.1.2(7)(a), 4.6.4, 4.30.7.

2. No van-accessible space is provided. Provide a van-accessible parking space that meets the requirements of the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5)(b), 4.6.4.

1. The mirror is mounted 42 inches from the finish floor to the bottom edge of the reflecting surface. Provide a mirror that is 40 inches maximum to the bottom edge of the reflecting surface. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.6(11), 4.22.6, 4.19.6, Fig. 31.

2. The entrance to the restroom is filled with boxes and shelf units. Clear the area so that 36 inches of clear width is provided for an accessible route. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(1), 4.2.1, 4.3.3.

15. Belair Mansion. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that Belair Mansion, which was altered in 1994, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. Parking. The access aisle is not demarcated and no van accessible space is provided. Provide a van accessible space with a 96 inch wide demarcated access aisle and signage. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5), 4.6.

B. Bedrooms. The bedrooms on the second floor are not accessible to individuals who use wheelchairs. There is a video that shows the mansion, but these bedrooms are not depicted. Provide an alternate means of viewing the bedrooms (such as a video or a still picture display) and develop a policy to inform individuals who use wheelchairs of the availability of the alternate method. 28 C.F.R. § 35.150(b)(2).

C. Unisex Restroom on the Basement Level.

1. The length of both grab bars is 33 inches. Provide a rear grab bar that is at least 36 inches long and provide a side grab bar so that its end nearest the back wall begins no more than 12 inches from the wall, it is at least 42 inches long and its end farthest from the back wall is located at least 54 inches from the wall. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.4, 4.16.4, Figure 29.

2. The hot water and drain pipes under the lavatory are not insulated or otherwise configured to protect against contact. Insulate the pipes under the lavatory. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.6, 4.19.4.

3. The faucet controls for the lavatory require twisting. Replace the faucets with controls that do not require tight pinching, grasping, or twisting of the wrist to operate. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.6, 4.19.5, 4.27.4.

D. Restrooms on the Upper Level.

1. The restroom signage is mounted on the restroom doors rather than on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the doors, has a glossy finish, and does not contain Braille or raised letters. Provide signage with Braille and raised letters and a non-glare finish on the wall adjacent to the latch side of the door so that the centerline of the sign is 60 inches above the finish floor and a person can approach within 3 inches of the signs without encountering protruding objects or standing within the swing of a door. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(16)(a), 4.30.4, 4.30.5, 4.30.6.

2. There is no directional signage at the upper level restroom, that indicates the location of the fully accessible unisex restroom on the basement level. Provide directional signage. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.6(3)(e)(iii), 4.1.3(16)(b), 4.30.2, 4.30.3, 4.30.5.

3. The restroom door has knob hardware that requires twisting of the wrist to operate. Replace the hardware with hardware that does not require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist to operate. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(7)(b), 4.13.9.

4. The hot water and drain pipes under the lavatory are not insulated or otherwise configured to protect against contact. Insulate the pipes under the lavatory. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(11), 4.22.6, 4.19.4.

16. Sport Fit Total Fitness Club. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that Sport Fit Total Fitness Club, which was altered in 1994, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities and meets the requirements of the title II regulation and the Standards.

A. Parking.

1. The designated accessible parking spaces are 88 inches wide instead of the minimum 96 inches required. Alter the spaces so that they are 96 inches wide. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5), 4.6.3, Fig. 9.

2. A van-accessible space is not provided. Alter the spaces to provide at least one van-accessible parking space served by an access aisle at least 96 inches wide and identified by an additional van-accessible sign mounted below the symbol of accessibility. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5)(b), 4.6.4.

3. The curb ramp extends into the accessible parking spaces’ access aisle. Alter the access aisle so that it is level, with surface slopes not exceeding 1:50 in any direction. Provide a curb ramp complying with the Standards in a location that will not intrude upon the accessible parking spaces or access aisles. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5), 4.6.3, 4.1.2(1), 4.3.8, 4.7.

4. There are three accessible parking spaces, one of which is not reserved by a sign showing the symbol of accessibility. Provide a sign complying with the Standards for the third accessible parking space. Standards §§ 4.1.6(2), 4.1.2(5), 4.6.4.

1. The main entrance is not accessible, and there is no directional signage displayed indicating the route to the designated accessible entrance. Provide directional signage complying with the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(8)(d), 4.30.1, 4.30.2, 4.30.3, 4.30.5.

2. The designated accessible entrance is not designated with the International Symbol of Accessibility. Provide signage displaying this symbol. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.2(7)(c), 4.30.7.

3. There is no directional signage displayed in the multi-purpose room and the locker rooms indicating the continued accessible route to the lower level. Provide directional signage complying with the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(8)(d), 4.30.1, 4.30.2, 4.30.3, and 4.30.5.

C. Policy. There is no accessible route to the upper level of the Sport Fit facility. The registration desk, business offices, tennis observation window, large screen television and lounge area are on the upper level. Develop a written agreement between Sport Fit and the City to ensure that the programs, services, and activities operated on the upper level, when viewed in their entirety, are readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities. For example, if a person in a wheelchair requests to observe the tennis courts, steps should be taken to allow that person to view the tennis matches in the tennis court on the lower level. The City will ensure that the employees at Sport Fit have procedures to register or conduct business with a wheelchair user who enters the facility on the lower level. See 28 C.F.R. § 35.150.

1. The Sport Fit New Locker Room renovation due to be undertaken in 2000 will provide at least one fully accessible one of each of the following (where provided) in at least one men’s and one women’s locker room: toilet stall (including one 36 inch wide stall as required in § 4.22.4 if 6 or more stalls are provided), shower, lavatory, urinal (men’s room only), mirror, bench, locker, dispensers, controls, etc. Within 30 days of their availability, submit to the Department the design drawings for the renovation of the locker rooms. The Department will review the drawings for conformity to the Standards, and the City will renovate this building in compliance with the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(3)(e)(iii), 4.1.3(11), 4.13, 4.18, 4.19, 4.25, 4.26, 4.27, 4.22, 4.30, 4.23, 4.21.

2. If only one men’s locker room and/or one women’s locker room for the men and women contains accessible features, provide signage directing people with disabilities to the accessible locker rooms and designate the accessible locker rooms with the International Symbol of Accessibility. Standards §§ 4.1.6(3)(e)(iii), 4.1.2(7)(d), 4.30.2, 4.30.3, 4.30.5, 4.30.7.

1. There is no access to the swimming pool from the men’s changing room. Provide a ramp that meets the requirements of the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.2(2), 4.3.8, 4.8.

2. The ramp from the women’s changing area to the swimming pool area has a slope that is greater than 1:12, does not appear to have a level landing, is not stable, firm and slip resistant, and does not have handrails. Reconstruct the ramp so that it meets the requirements of the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.2(2), 4.8.

F. Tennis Court. The designated accessible route to the tennis facility was constructed in 1997, and has a gravel surface. Reconstruct the route so that the surface is stable, firm, and slip-resistant. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.2(2), 4.3.6, 4.5.

G. Door. The inner door at the lower level (near the employee’s parking lot) on the route to the tennis court has a clear opening width of 27 1/2 inches. Alter the door to provide a minimum clear opening of at least 32 inches with the door open 90 degrees, measured between the face of the door and the opposite stop. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(7)(c), 4.13.5.

H. Drinking Fountains. There are no accessible water fountains. Provide a drinking fountain that is accessible to individuals who use wheelchairs and one accessible to those who have difficulty bending or stooping that complies with the requirements of the Standards. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(10), 4.15.

I. Aerobic Room. The aerobic room is not accessible to individuals with mobility impairments. The City should develop a policy with Sport Fit to ensure that the aerobics class is relocated to an accessible location (e.g., the basketball court) when a person with a mobility impairment wishes to participate in the aerobics class. 28 C.F.R. §§ 35.149 and 35.150.

J. Counter. The top of the service counter in the gym is 42 inches above the finish floor. Provide a portion of the counter that is at least 36 inches long and not more than 36 inches high, or provide an auxiliary counter that is not more than 36 inches high in close proximity to the main counter, or provide access programmatically through equivalent facilitation. Standards § 7.2(2).

If the City chooses not to alter the service counter referenced in this paragraph, the City should develop a policy statement that identifies the methods that will be used to ensure that individuals with disabilities are afforded the programs, services and activities that are available at the service counter.

K. Basketball Court. Each leaf of the double-leaf doors to the basketball court has a clear opening width of 28 inches. Alter the door so that one door leaf has a minimum clear opening of at least 32 inches with the door open 90 degrees, measured between the face of the door and the opposite stop. Standards §§ 4.1.6(1)(b), 4.1.3(7)(b), 4.13.4, 4.13.5.

17. Bowie Community Center. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that the programs offered at the Bowie Community Center are readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

A. Parking. One of two designated accessible parking spaces does not have an access aisle and the space is not on the shortest accessible route. The existing access aisle for the other accessible space is 55 inches wide. In addition, a van accessible space is not provided. Relocate the far right hand to the other side of the access aisle space so that it is on the shortest accessible route of travel to the entrance. Alter the spaces to provide at least one van accessible parking space served by an access aisle at least 96 inches wide and identified by an additional van accessible sign mounted below the symbol of accessibility, and provide an access aisle at least 60 inches wide for the other accessible space. Standards §§ 4.1.2(5)(b), 4.6.2, 4.6.3, 4.6.4, Fig. 9.

B. Accessible Route. The ramp to the entrance from the parking lot is very steep and exceeds the slope requirements of the Standards. Reconstruct the ramp to comply with the Standards, or use the Storybrook entrance as the accessible entrance, identify it with the International Symbol of Accessibility, and provide signage directing people with disabilities to that entrance. Standards §§ 4.1.2(7)(c), 4.3.7, 4.8, 4.1.3(8)(d), 4.30.2, 4.30.3, 4.30.5.

C. Women’s Restroom.

1. The coat hook on the door to the accessible stall is 66 inches from the floor. Provide a coat hook that is no more than 54 inches above the finish floor for a side reach or no higher than 48 inches above the finish floor for a forward reach. Standards §§ 4.25.3, 4.2.5, 4.2.6.

2. The bottom of the reflecting surface of the mirrors is more than 40 inches above the finish floor. Relocate the mirror or add a new mirror so that the sink with lever-type hardware and covered pipes has a mirror over it with a reflecting surface no higher than 40 inches off the finish floor. Standards § 4.19.6.

3. The side and rear grab bars in the accessible toilet stall are 29 inches above the finish floor. Provide side and rear grab bars that are between 33 and 36 inches above the finish floor. Standards § 4.17.6 and Fig. 30(c), (d).

1. The coat hook on the door to the accessible stall is 66 inches from the floor. Provide a coat hook that is no more than 54 inches above the finish floor for a side reach or no higher than 48 inches above the finish floor for a forward reach. Standards §§ 4.25.3, 4.2.5, 4.2.6.

2. The bottom of the reflecting surface of the mirrors is more than 40 inches above the finish floor. Relocate the mirror or add a new mirror with a reflecting surface no higher than 40 inches off the finish floor. Standards § 4.19.6.

3. The side and rear grab bars in the accessible toilet stall are 29 inches above the finish floor. Provide side and rear grab bars that are between 33 and 36 inches above the finish floor. Standards § 4.17.6 and Fig. 30(c), (d).

18. City of Bowie Football Field. By October 30, 2001, the City shall correct the following to ensure that the programs offered at the City of Bowie Football Field are readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

A. Parking.

1. The accessible parking space has a gravel surface. Resurface the space and access aisle and the accessible route from the space to the stadium so that they are stable, firm, and slip-resistant. Standards § 4.5.1.

2. A van-accessible space is not provided. Provide at least one van-accessible parking space served by an access aisle at least 96 inches wide and identified by an additional van-accessible sign mounted below the symbol of accessibility. Standards §§ 4.1.2(5)(b), 4.6.4.

A. Within 180 days of the effective date of this Agreement, the City shall correct the following to ensure that the programs offered at the Bowie Playhouse are readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

1. Parking. The designated accessible parking spaces do not have an access aisle that is demarcated. Provide a line indicating the boundary of the access aisle or demarcate the access aisle in another way. Standards § 4.6.3, Fig. 9.

2. Dressing Room. There is no accessible route to the dressing room on the lower level. Develop a policy to ensure that, when an individual with a disability has to use the dressing room, an alternate equivalent accessible space will be designated as the accessible dressing room. 28 C.F.R. §§ 35.149, 35.150.

B. By January 1, 2002, the City shall correct the following to ensure that the programs offered at the Bowie Playhouse are readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

1. Entrance. Each of the leaves of the double leaf door has a clear opening width of 30 inches. Provide one door leaf with a minimum clear opening of at least 32 inches with the door open 90 degrees, measured between the face of the door and the opposite stop. Standards §§ 4.13.4, 4.13.5.

2. Women’s Restroom

a. The door to the restroom has a clear opening width of 29 1/2 inches. Alter the door so that it has a minimum clear opening of 32 inches with the door open 90 degrees, measured between the face of the door and the opposite stop. Standards § 4.13.5.

b. The women’s restroom does not have accessible toilet stalls. Renovate the restroom to provide at least one fully accessible stall. Standards § 4.17.

c. The mirror is mounted 47 inches from the floor to the bottom edge of the reflecting surface. Provide a mirror that is 40 inches maximum to the bottom edge of the reflecting surface. Standards § 4.19.6, Fig. 31.

d. The hot water and drain pipes under the lavatories are not insulated or otherwise configured to protect against contact. Insulate the pipes under the accessible lavatory. Standards § 4.19.4.

3. Men’s Restroom

a. The door to the restroom has a clear opening width of 30 inches. Alter the door so that it has a minimum clear opening of 32 inches with the door open 90 degrees, measured between the face of the door and the opposite stop. Standards § 4.13.5.

b. The men’s restroom does not have accessible toilet stalls. Renovate the restroom to provide at least one fully accessible stall. Standards § 4.17.

c. The mirror is mounted 47 inches from the floor to the bottom edge of the reflecting surface. Provide a mirror that is no more than 40 inches to the bottom edge of the reflecting surface. Standards § 4.19.6, Fig. 31.

d. The hot water and drain pipes under the lavatories are not insulated or otherwise configured to protect against contact. Insulate the pipes under the accessible lavatory. Standards § 4.19.4.

4. Theater. The accessible seating area does not provide adequate space for wheelchair seating. Provide four wheelchair seating locations that are each at least 60 inches deep and 33 inches wide with adjacent fixed companion seats next to each wheelchair seating location. Standards §§ 4.1.3(19)(a), 4.33, Fig. 46.

IMPLEMENTATION AND ENFORCEMENT

20. Except as otherwise specified in this Agreement, at 90 and 180 days after the effective date of this Agreement, and thereafter at yearly anniversaries of the effective date, the City will submit written reports to the Department summarizing the actions the City has taken pursuant to this Agreement. Reports will include photographs, architectural plans, notices published in the newspapers, copies of adopted policies, and proof of efforts to secure funding/assistance for structural renovations.

21. If at any time the City desires to modify any portion of this Agreement because of changed conditions making performance impossible or impractical or for any other reason, it will promptly notify the Department in writing, setting forth the facts and circumstances thought to justify modification and the substance of the proposed modification. Until there is written Agreement by the Department to the proposed modification, the proposed modification will not take effect. These actions must receive the prior written approval of the Department, which approval shall not be unreasonably withheld or delayed.

22. The Department may review compliance with this Agreement at any time. If the Department believes that this Agreement or any portion of it has been violated, it will so notify the City in writing and it will attempt to resolve the issue or issues in good faith. If the Department is unable to reach a satisfactory resolution of the issue or issues raised within 30 days of the date it provides notice to the City, it may institute a civil action in federal district court directly to enforce title II or to enforce the terms of this Agreement.

23. Failure by the Department to enforce this entire Agreement or any provision thereof with regard to any deadline or any other provision herein shall not be construed as a waiver of the Department's right to enforce other deadlines and provisions of this Agreement.

24. In the event that the City fails to comply in a timely manner with any requirement of this Agreement without obtaining sufficient advance written agreement with the Department as a temporary modification of the relevant terms of this Agreement, the Department may file suit in an appropriate federal court to enforce the terms of the Agreement or may declare the Agreement null and void and file suit to enforce title II of the ADA.

25. This Agreement is a public document. A copy of this document or any information contained in it may be made available to any person by the City or the Department on request.

26. The effective date of this Agreement is the date of the last signature below.

27. This Agreement constitutes the entire agreement between the parties on the matters raised herein, and no other statement, promise, or agreement, either written or oral, made by either party or agents of either party, that is not contained in this written Agreement, shall be enforceable. This Agreement does not purport to remedy any other potential violations of the ADA or any other Federal law. This Agreement does not affect the City's continuing responsibility to comply with all aspects of the ADA.

28. This Agreement will remain in effect for three years from the effective date of this Agreement, or until the parties agree that full compliance with this Agreement by the City has been achieved.

29. The person signing for the City of Bowie represents that he or she is authorized to bind the City to this Agreement.


25 Things to Love about Bowie and Crofton

With more than 80,000 residents between them, the neighboring cities of Crofton and Bowie certainly have a lot of appeal for current and prospective residents.

From fine dining to shopping and sporting events or even a night at the theatre, there's no shortage of things to do in both places.

Because they offer an easy commute to big cities nearby and yet remain known for being family friendly, Crofton and Bowie have a charm that attracts new residents year after year. Both locales have earned recognition in recent years from Money Magazine as being among the 100 “Best Places to Live.” Crofton earned the designation in 2011 Bowie was recognized in 2014.

While the list of things to like could go on and on, we've compiled just 25 things to love about Crofton and Bowie.

Six Flags America

Right on the outskirts of Bowie in Michellville is Maryland's only amusement park, Six Flags America.

The park features live performances, plenty of food options, a water park and every kind of roller coaster imaginable, plus more sedate rides for young children and/or nervous grown-ups.

This year, the park will be open March 30-April 8 to accommodate students on spring vacations. The park will remain open on weekends April 14-May 20. The park will open for the summer season May 25.

For more information, visit http://www.sixflags.com or call 301-249-1500.

The park is at 13710 Central Ave. in Mitchellville.

Bowie Baysox

Want to see the major-league stars of tomorrow? They’re right in your own backyard at Prince George’s Stadium in Bowie.

Fans who want to see professional baseball don’t need to fight the traffic, worry about parking or pay major-league ticket prices to see the Washington Nationals or Baltimore Orioles play.

Instead, they can visit Bowie’s very own ballpark and see live professional baseball.

The Bowie Baysox, the Baltimore Orioles’ Class AA affiliate in the Eastern League, have been playing in Bowie for the last two decades. In 2015, the team won its first Eastern League championship.

Since the Orioles moved their Double-A operation to Bowie from Frederick in the early 1990s, scores of Baysox players have gone on to join major league teams. Current Orioles Manny Machado, Trey Mancini and Jonathan Schoop are among them.

In addition to the baseball games, there are plenty of innovative promotions, including postgame fireworks displays after almost every Friday and Saturday night game. The ballclub organizes plenty of family friendly events at the stadium each year, including the family camp-outs, Girl Scout sleepovers and helicopter candy drops. They even have their own carousel for younger fans to ride while the games are being played.

The Baysox’ 2018 season begins in April (the home opener is April 5 vs. Harrisburg) and runs through Labor Day weekend. There are 70 schedule home dates for the ballclub.

For more information, visit www.baysox.com.

Youth Athletics

Kids in Bowie and Crofton can pursue their particular sports interest or try just something new – as long as parents get them registered quickly enough.

The Crofton Athletic Council offers sports like baseball, soccer, softball, basketball, girls lacrosse and boys lacrosse, along with cheerleading, cross country, volleyball and field hockey.

Interested in volunteering or in registering a child for upcoming sports? Visit http://www.croftonsports.com.

The Bowie Boys & Girls Club has been putting the city’s youth through its athletic paces for about a half-century.

Bowie youths can participate in baseball, football, basketball, soccer, softball, lacrosse, cheerleading – and even cricket – as part of the program.

For more information, visit http://www.bbgc.com or call 301-262-6113.

There is also a South Bowie Boys & Girls Club. For more information about that organization’s activities and programs, visit http://sbbgc.org.

Bowie Ice Arena

Last summer marked the start of the 47th season of skating at the City of Bowie Ice Arena. It offers ice skating for all ages and levels. Discounts are available for City of Bowie residents as well as groups and families.The Bowie Ice Arena is home to the Bowie Figure Skating Club, the Bowie Hockey Club, the Bowie High School “Ice Dogs” and the Bowie ISI figure skating team.

For more information, call 301-809-3090.

All of those groups will be getting a new home soon. The city has committed $24 million toward a new ice arena that will be built near Freeway Airport on Church Road. The new facility will include two rinks (so the facility can more easily host tournaments, plus eight locker rooms, a pro shop, a concession stand and a lounging area. The facility is expected to be completed in the fall of 2020.

Linthicum Walks Home

Linthicum Walks (2295 Davidsonville Road) is a 200-year-old house in Crofton whose history reflects the agricultural past of western Anne Arundel County. For most of its history, the house and over 200 acres of surrounding land belonged to the Linthicum family. During most of those years, it was a typical medium-sized farm with tobacco being the primary cash crop. Most of the family’s food was also produced on the farm. The original land grant for the property dates back to 1672.

Today, the property serves as a historical site and is maintained by a group called the Friends of Linthicum Walks. At the site, there are tours, lectures and exhibits offered regularly.

For more information, visit www.historiclinthicumwalks.com or call (410) 451-5900.

Bowie Museums

You don’t have to travel to Washington or Baltimore to visit a museum – Bowie has plenty to choose from.

The City of Bowie operates the Belair Mansion, the Belair Stable Museum and the Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum, their collections and exhibits.

The Belair Mansion (12207 Tulip Grove Dr.) dates to about 1745 and interprets the lives of residents from 1747-1950.

The Belair Stable Museum (2835 Belair Drive) offers a look at the city’s horse racing history. The site served as one of the country’s premier thoroughbred stables from the 1920s through the 1950s. Belair was home to Gallant Fox (1930) and Omaha (1935), the only father/son duo to capture thoroughbred racing’s Triple Crown.

The Bowie Railroad Station and Huntington Museum (8614 Chestnut Ave.) was created to help preserve the city’s railroad history. In 1872, the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad (later integrated into the Pennsylvania Railroad System) opened a station in what is now called Old Town Bowie.

For information about any of the city’s museums, call 301-809-3089.

The city is also home to the National Capital Radio & Television Museum (2608 Mitchellville Road), which features all manner of antique radios and television sets. The museum also offers screenings of vintage television programs on certain days. For more information, call 301-390-1020.

Easy access to Baltimore, Washington and Annapolis.

Bowie and Crofton residents have just a short drive to the attractions and activities of Washington, D.C., Baltimore and Annapolis.

All three cities feature the kinds of attractions you just won’t find in the suburbs. For history buffs, Washington offers all kinds of monuments, museums and, of course, the White House. Baltimore can boast Fort McHenry, Babe Ruth’s birthplace and the Edgar Allen Poe House. Annapolis, meanwhile, retains much of its colonial flavor in the downtown arena and is home to the U.S. Naval Academy and the Maryland State House.

All three cities offer all kinds of cultural opportunities as well – live theater, dance, art museums and much more.

For more ideas about things to do in Washington D.C., visit http://www.washington.org.

To dig deeper into what Baltimore has to offer, visit http://www.baltimore.org.

To find out more about Annapolis attractions, go to www.visitannapolis.org.

Farmers Markets

Both Bowie and Crofton boast their own farmers markets, which offer fruit, vegetables, meat, fresh-cut flowers and bedding plants.

Produce, bread, beef and fresh-cut flowers are among the items available from local vendors.

The Bowie Farmers' Market will open May 20 and operates every Sunday 8 a.m.-noon through Oct. 28. The market is held in the Bowie Center for the Performing Arts parking lot at 15200 Annapolis Road. For more information, visit www.cityofbowie.org.

The Crofton Farmers Market is Anne Arundel County’s largest, with more than 50 confirmed vendors. The market is open Wednesdays 3-7 p.m. from May 2 to Oct. 24 and is at Crofton Country Club,1691 Crofton Pkwy.

For more information, visit http://croftonfarmersmarket.com.

Allen Pond

The 85-acre open space known as Allen Pond Park is one of Bowie's major outdoor recreational areas.

Fishing, playgrounds, picnic tables, grills and ballfields are just a few of the park's many amenities.

The park is home to the Bowie Skate Park, the Bowie Ice Arena, and the Robert V. Setera Ampitheater and – site of the long-running Sunday Night Concert Series in Bowie. Concerts there will be held Sunday nights, 7-8 p.m., May 27 to Sept. 2.

Park admission is free, but there is a fee for picnic site rentals and permits are required for use of the athletic fields.

Visitors can enjoy the park daily from sunrise to sunset. It's at 3330 Northview Dr. Call 301-809-3011 for more information.

Golfers have six courses to choose from in the immediate area, including Crofton Country Club or Walden Country Club in Crofton and Bowie Golf & Country Club, Glenn Dale Golf Club, Enterprise Golf Course and the Country Club at Woodmore in the greater Bowie area.

For more information on Crofton Country Club, call 410-721-3111 or visit http://www.croftonclub.com/golf.

For more information about Walden Country Club, call 410-721-8268 or visit http://www.waldencountryclub.com.

To find out more about Bowie Golf & Country Club, call 301-262-8141 or visit www.bowiegolf.com.

To learn more about Glenn Dale Golf Club, call (301) 262-1166 or visit www.glenndalegolfclub.com.

Enterprise Golf Course can be reached at (301) 249-2040, or by visiting http://www.pgparks.com.

For more information about the Country Club at Woodmore, call (301) 249-6100 or visit http://www.ccwoodmore.com.

Bowie State University

Founded in 1865, Bowie State University is Maryland's oldest historically black college.

BSU began in Baltimore as a college for aspiring teachers and later moved to Bowie.

Now, the school has a plethora of majors, including Nursing, Communications, Secondary Education, Marketing, Management and Economics.

Over 5,000 students attend Bowie State University for graduate and undergraduate programs.

Bowie State University has been recognized by Forbes as one of America's Top Colleges and is listed among U.S. News & World Report's top 25 historically black colleges and universities.

Bowie State opened a $71 million Fine and Performing Arts Center in 2012, a new $42 million student center in 2013 and a $107 million state-of-the-art Center for Natural Science, Mathematics and Nursing just a few weeks ago.

For more information, visit http://www.bowiestate.edu.

Old Town Bowie

Historic Old Town Bowie is geographically separated from the hustle and bustle of routes 197, 301 and 450. But it has its own quaint charm. Old Bowie was once a thriving railroad town and is now home to several antique shops, retail outlets, restaurants, historical landmarks, a railroad museum, and Town Green Park.

While perusing the shops, you can also tour the city’s railroad museum and watch the local trains travel along the tracks or just relax in the park. And if you get hungry during your exploration, visit one of three local restaurants, all within a five-minute walk of one another.

To get more information, visit www.cityofbowie.org.

Bowie Center for the Performing Arts

The Bowie Center for the Performing Arts (15200 Annapolis Road) was conceived as an instructional and civic facility for the performing arts and to be available for multiple activities, including but not limited to: music, dance, theater, drama, creative exhibits, lectures, films, meetings, workshops and concerts.

The 750-seat venue is home to all manner of school concerts and productions. It was initially created through a grassroots effort to provide a home for students involved in the performing arts at Bowie High School, which sits next door.

The center has also served as home to such diverse events as film festivals, concerts by the Prince George’s Philharmonic and issue forums for local political candidates.

To find out more information about the center, call (301) 805-6880 or visit www.bowiecenter.org.

Bowie Senior Center

Folks who move to Bowie seldom want to leave and the city’s nationally accredited 29,000-sq.ft. senior center (14900 Health Center Drive) offers all kinds of opportunities for those residents who grew up with Bowie and want to stay.

The center boasts various social, educational, creative and recreational programs. Information and referral services, transportation services, and a lunch program are also available. Adults age 55 and over are welcome to participate.

The mission of the Bowie Senior Center is to serve, support, and enhance the lives of senior adults by providing programs and services that promote active, independent and healthy lifestyles. Contact the center at 301-809-2300 or visit www.cityofbowie.org/seniorcenter.

Crofton Bowling Centre

Whether you're a seasoned pro or a novice, the Crofton Bowling Centre has leagues and other special events as well as 48 lanes for you to show off or improve your skills.

On Friday and Saturday nights, Millennium Bowling pairs all you can bowl with a DJ and a light show.

If you prefer not to wait for a lane, you can book your lane reservations online.

In addition to bowling, the facility offers a snack bar, a full service bar and an arcade. It’s also available for birthday parties and corporate events.

And, Crofton Bowling Centre rewards kids for getting good grades in school. For every A that a student earns, he or she will get a free game. Just bring in your report card to get your free game.

The Crofton Bowling Centre is at 2115 Priest Bridge Dr.

For more information, call 410-721-2401 or 301-261-6670.

Online reservations can be made at http://www.croftonbowl.com

Go Kart Raceway

The Go Kart Raceway in Crofton is Maryland's largest outdoor course. Adults and children ages 8 and up can enjoy racing along a half-mile track with 20 turns.

Drivers can choose from single or double karts and discounted rates are available for groups.

The raceway has 40 go karts and is equipped to handle birthday parties, church groups, corporate outings and more.

In the event of inclement weather, such as rain, the raceway closes but updates are posted to social media and the raceway's website.

The raceway is at 1050 Md. Route 3 South.

For more information visit http://www.croftongokartraceway.com or call 410-721-2900.

Bowiefest

Bowiefest is a long-standing tradition in the city, bringing out the best of Bowie’s civic organizations, entertainers, and businesses to one place for one day. This year’s event is scheduled for June 2 at Allen Pond Park. It will run 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

It features rides, performances, contests, and a host of food and drink options throughout the park. There's also an arts and crafts fair, a Business Expo in the Ice Arena and local organizations of every size and interest will be on hand to introduce you what they do.

Crofton’s Festival on the Green

Festival on the Green is held twice a year – spring and fall - in Crofton and draws hundreds of people to socialize, shop, eat or just hang out.

The festivals are sponsored by the Greater Crofton Chamber of Commerce and typically feature attractions like craft vendors, pony rides, food, and information booths set up by local businesses.

The 2018 spring festival is scheduled for April 28, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the overflow parking lot of Crofton Country Club.

Skate Zone Crofton

Skate Zone Crofton is a recreational destination for Crofton kids.

Skate Zone Crofton features special skate night events for area schools, weekday and weeknight skating deals. It’s also a favorite spot for school field trips, summer camp trips and corporate events and birthday parties.

Skate Zone Crofton has a pro shop on site as well as a snack bar. It's at 1082 Route 3 South at Capitol Raceway Road.

For more information, call 410-721-7155.

Bowie shopping & dining

Bowie offers a wealth of options to suit every taste at its various shopping centers.

More than a half-dozen retail choices are clustered close together along the main roads like state routes 197, 301 and 450.

At Bowie Town Center (15606 Emerald Way), there’s Barnes & Noble, Macy’s, Sears, Safeway and Best Buy, along with plenty of places to stop and eat.

Hilltop Plaza (Rte. 450 and Racetrack Road) offers Walgreen’s, Aldi and the Blue Sunday restaurant, among other shops.

Bowie Plaza (6824 Laurel-Bowie Road) features Bowie Custom Bath & Tile, Sherwin Williams and T.J.Elliot’s restaurant.

At Gateway Center (4400 Mitchellville Road), shoppers can visit Target, Kohl’s, Petsmart and Pier 1 Imports. Lowe’s and Home Depot are both nearby.

Groceries (Giant Food), office supplies (Office Depot) and clothes (Ross and T.J. Maxx) are among the offering at Free State shopping center (Annapolis Road and Superior Lane)

In 2016, the refurbished Bowie Marketplace – right across the street from Free State – opened with much fanfare and offers options like Harris Teeter, Chick-fil-A and Petco.

Dining and Shopping at the Village at Waugh Chapel

If you're in search of the latest fashions or dinner out, the the Village at Waugh Chapel is the place to be.

Specialty stores include Little Treasury Jewelers and Pier 1 Imports and fashion retailers like T.J. Maxx, SAS Shoes and Marshalls can also be found here.

Restaurants featuring all kinds of cuisine include Grotto Pizza, 4 Seasons Grille, Firehouse Subs, Frisco Tap House, Newk’s Eatery and Chipotle Mexican Grill.

The shopping center is at 1326 Main Chapel Way, Gambrills.

Bowie Memorial Day Parade

This annual patriotic exercise involves virtually every group or organization in the city – and most of its children. It also serves as the unofficial kick-off to summer and it also signals the city’s swimming pools are open for business.

The parade takes place every year on the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend. This year, it’s May 26. It’s the city's salute to all of our service men and women and the veterans who have served in the past. It is also a day to remember those who died while serving their country.

The procession features marching bands, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, politicians, baton twirlers, community groups, animals – something for everyone.

For more information, visit www.cityofbowie.org

Crofton Halloween Parade

The Kiwanis Club's annual Halloween parade has been a part of autumn in Crofton for more than 30 years. It’s always held on the Saturday closest to Halloween. This year, that’s Oct. 27.

The parade starts with floats and other adult participants at the Crofton Country Club North parking lot and proceeds on Crofton Parkway to the Crofton Woods Elementary School. Costumed children join the procession at Prince of Peace Church.

Everyone then marches the last half-mile to Crofton Woods Elementary, where there are refreshments, bands and various prizes for the best costumes – some of which are quite elaborate.

Santa and the sirens

It wouldn’t be Christmas in Bowie without the arrival of Santa Claus on a fire truck. For many years, Kris Kringle has greeted Bowie children from atop a piece of emergency equipment operated by the Bowie volunteer fire department.

Santa cruises through various neighborhoods – the schedule is always published in advance - tossing out candy to the youngsters. His appearances are generally made between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. on designated days.

Firefighters along for the ride collect donations of canned goods for the Bowie Interfaith Pantry, the city’s major food bank. To donate, have your canned goods ready before Santa comes to your neighborhood.

Bowie International Festival

The Bowie International Festival, held the first Saturday in October every year at Allen Pond Park, is a celebration of the diversity and international flavor of the city of Bowie. This year, the event is scheduled for Oct. 6.

At the festival, there is always a variety of entertainers, artists, crafters, food, and children’s activities. As the city’s literature on the event points out, this event will take you “Around the World in Just One Day.” There are all kinds of dancers and musical performers on two stages, offering a glimpse into any number of cultures. The many food, craft and clothing offerings from vendors also offer a taste of countries all over the world.


Watch the video: David Bowie Station To Station Live 1978


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