Supermarine N.1B

Supermarine N.1B


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Supermarine N.1B

The Supermarine N.1B was a single-seat scout designed to escort the RNAS's patrol flying boats.

In April 1917 the Admiralty Department of the Air Board issued Specification N.1(b), which called for a small boat to act as an escort to the RNAS's larger flying boats, and to replace the Sopwith Baby seaplane. The aircraft could be a tractor or a pusher, and a flying boat or a floatplane. It was to be armed with one Lewis gun and the mountings for a second above the top wing, have a top speed of 85 knots, a service ceiling of 10,000ft and an endurance of 3 hours. It was to have folding wings so it could be stored onboard ship.

Supermarine produced a pusher biplane, with a two-step hull based on the AD Flying Boat (the Admiralty Department two seat patrol boat first designed in 1915). It had an open cockpit close to the nose. The pusher engine was mounted just below the upper wing. The tailplane was carried just above the vertical tail fin, in order to keep it well above the water. A small fin was added on top of the tailplane after early trials.

The N1.B made its maiden flight in February 1918, with Flight Lieutenant Goodwin at the control The aircraft was originally powered by a 200hp Hispano-Suiza engine, with which it reached 116mph at sea level in April 1918. It was later given a 200hp Sunbeam Arab engine, with which it reached 10,700ft.

Three were ordered (N59, N60 and N61). Of these only N59 was completed and assembled. The parts for N60 were completed, but it was used as a source of spare parts. N.61 wasn't completed. The type wasn't ordered into production.

The N.1B was the start of a long family of Supermarine pusher flying boats,. The Supermarine Sea Lion I may have been built using the hull of N61 and the Sea King I was also based on the N.1B design. The basic design was also used on the Supermarine Seal, the start of a family of aircraft that ended with the Supermarine Walrus, a spotter plane that saw service during the Second World War.

Engine: Hispano-Suiza or Sunbeam Arab
Power: 200hp (either)
Crew: 1
Span: 30ft 6in
Length: 26ft 3.5in
Height: 10ft 7in
Empty weight: 1,699lb (Hispano-Suiza) or 1,902lb (Sunbeam Arab)
All-up weight: 1,902lb (Hispano-Suiza) or 2,508lb (Sunbeam Arab)
Max speed: 116mph at sea level (Hispano-Suiza)
Climb Rate: 430ft/ min (Sunbeam Arab)
Service ceiling: 10,700ft (Sunbeam Arab)
Endurance: 3 hours
Armament: One or two .303in Lewis guns

Books on the First World War |Subject Index: First World War


Development and design

In 1916, the British Admiralty drew up Requirement N.1B for a single-seat floatplane or flying boat fighter aircraft to operate from the Royal Navy's seaplane carriers, demanding a speed of 110   mph (177   km/h) and a ceiling of 20,000   ft (6,100   m). Three companies submitted designs in response, Blackburn and Supermarine with flying boats (the Blackburn N.1B and Supermarine Baby), while Westland proposed a floatplane, the Westland N.1B. Westland received an order for two aircraft. [1]

Westland's design, which was the first original design built by Westland, was a single-engined tractor biplane of wooden construction. [1] It had a deep fuselage, while its two-bay wings were designed to fold to save space on ship, and were fitted with trailing-edge flaps. It was powered by a single Bentley A.R.1 rotary engine (later known as the BR1) and carried a single synchronised forward-firing Vickers machine gun on the nose, and a Lewis gun firing over the upper wing. [2] [3] The first N.1B was fitted with 11   ft (3.35   m) long Sopwith main floats and a 5   ft (1.52   m) long tail float, while the second N.1B had much longer (17   ft 6   in 5.34   m) main floats, which removed the need for a tail float. [4]

The first N.1B, serial number N16 was first flown by Harry Hawker from Westland's Yeovil factory in August 1917. [5] The two N.1Bs were evaluated at the Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot in October 1917, [6] demonstrating good performance and handling. [5] By this time, however, the Royal Naval Air Service was operating Sopwith Pup landplanes from flying-off platforms aboard ships, which did not require the carrier to heave-to in order to lower a seaplane to the water, and was planning to carry out similar operations with the Sopwith Camel, and the N.1B programme was cancelled. [6]


Development and design [ edit | edit source ]

In 1917, the British Admiralty issued Specification N.1B, for single-engined, single-seat aircraft which laid down a number of requirements of aircraft to equip the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS), including a requirement for a single-engined floatplane or flying boat fighter aircraft intended to operate from the Royal Navy's seaplane carriers. Ώ] The specification required a maximum speed of 110 miles per hour (96 kn 180 km/h) at 10,000 ft (3,000 m), and a ceiling of 20,000 ft (6,100 m). ΐ] Responses were received from a number of companies, including the Supermarine Baby and the Westland N.1B, as well as that from the Norman Thompson Flight Company. The Norman Thompson design, the Norman Thompson N.1B was a pusher biplane, with two-bay equal span wings that folded forwards for storage onboard ship, with ailerons on both upper and lower wings. A single Hispano-Suiza engine mounted between the wings drove a four-blade propeller. While the Specification required a single-seat aircraft, the Norman Thompson aircraft had a crew of two, seated in separate tandem cockpits ahead of the wings, giving rise to its alternative name of TNT (Tandem Norman Thompson). Α] Β]

Construction of a single prototype, N37 was ordered by the Admiralty in April 1917, Α] first flying in October that year. Γ] Norman Thompson claimed that the aircraft had good performance, reaching a speed of 108 mph (174 km/h), but when the aircraft was officially tested at the Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot, performance was much less than that claimed by Norman Thompson, and did not meet the requirements of the specification. Δ] Ε] No production of any of the aircraft designed against Specification N.1B followed, with the RNAS operating Sopwith Pup and Camel landplanes from flying off platforms aboard ships, which did not require the carrier to heave-to in order to lower a seaplane to the water. The Norman Thompson N.1B was struck off charge by October 1918.


Development and design [ edit | edit source ]

In 1916, the British Admiralty drew up Requirement N.1B for a single-seat floatplane or flying boat fighter aircraft to operate from the Royal Navy's seaplane carriers, demanding a speed of 110 mph (177 km/h) and a ceiling of 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Three companies submitted designs in response, Blackburn and Supermarine with flying boats (the Blackburn N.1B and Supermarine Baby), while Westland proposed a floatplane, the Westland N.1B. Westland received an order for two aircraft. Ώ] Westland's design, which was the first original design built by Westland, was a single-engined tractor biplane of wooden construction. Ώ] It had a deep fuselage, while its two-bay wings were designed to fold to save space on ship, and were fitted with trailing-edge flaps. It was powered by a single Bentley A.R.1 rotary engine (later known as the BR1) and carried a single synchronised forward-firing Vickers machine gun on the nose, and a Lewis gun firing over the upper wing. ΐ] Α] The first N.1B was fitted with 11 ft (3.35 m) long Sopwith main floats and a 5 ft (1.52 m) long tail float, while the second N.1B had much longer (17 ft 6 in (5.34 m) main floats, which removed the need for a tail float. Β]

The first N.1B, serial number N16 was first flown by Harry Hawker from Westland's Yeovil factory in August 1917. Γ] The two N.1Bs were evaluated at the Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot in October 1917, Δ] demonstrating good performance and handling. Γ] By this time, however, the Royal Naval Air Service was operating Sopwith Pup landplanes from flying-off platforms aboard ships, which did not require the carrier to heave-to in order to lower a seaplane to the water, and was planning to carry out similar operations with the Sopwith Camel, and the N.1B programme was cancelled. Δ]


Supermarine N.1B - History

The Olympia Aero Show 1920

Supermarine Aviation Works, Ltd. (STAND 45) Southampton.

The "Sea-King" is a small single-seater fighting scout, fitted with a 160 h.p. Beardmore engine. In general design this machine is similar to the "Baby," and the Schneider Cup models of last year. The hull is practically of circular cross-section, with a V-bottom from stem to step, which is situated under the main planes. Between the first step and the stern a second step "grows" out of the hull. The pilot is seated well forward. Upper and lower planes are each in three sections, and the interplane struts, of which there are four pairs, slope outwards. The two innermost pairs are located at the centre sections, the lower one of which is of considerably smaller span than the upper this lower section is supported on the hull by two pairs of struts, forming continuations of the centre-section interplane struts. The engine is mounted, in a streamline housing, midway between the planes on the lower centre section by six struts. The tail plane is of the monoplane inverted camber type, mounted on the top of a vertical fin above the stern of the hull. Wing-tip floats are mounted below the outer interplane struts. The speed range of the "Sea-King" is 51 to 96 knots (58-7 to 1105 m.p.h.).

The "Sea King" is very similar in general design to the Channel type, but is a small fast single-seater, capable of a speed of over 100 m.p.h. with a 160 h.p. Beardmore engine. The chief difference between the two boats, apart from size, is that the "Sea King" has a monoplane tail, and the rudder is extended down to the heel of the hull, forming a water rudder. This part of the rudder is covered with three-ply wood. As the machine is of such small overall dimensions, its wings are not made to fold as are those of the Channel type.

Flight, April 1922

THE SUPERMARINE SINGLE-SEATER FIGHTING SCOUT "SEA KING," MARK II.
An Interesting Amphibian Flying Boat, with Hispano Engine


7 Construction - Stressed Skin Duralumin

All previous RAF fighter aircraft used more traditional wooden formers covered with stressed fabrics skins. While this was great for weight saving, it did little to add survivability for the aircraft.

Supermarine's approach was a first for the RAF, constructed entirely from metal using duralumin panels over a series of metal formers added strength without impacting performance, the airframe able to withstand greater operational g-forces contributed to Spitfires legendary handling capabilities.


Development and design

In 1917, the British Admiralty issued Specification N.1B, for single-engined, single-seat aircraft which laid down a number of requirements of aircraft to equip the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS), including a requirement for a single-engined floatplane or flying boat fighter aircraft intended to operate from the Royal Navy's seaplane carriers. ΐ] The specification required a maximum speed of 110 miles per hour (96 kn 180 km/h) at 10,000 ft (3,000 m), and a ceiling of 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Α] Responses were received from a number of companies, including the Supermarine Baby and the Westland N.1B, as well as that from the Norman Thompson Flight Company.

The Norman Thompson design, the Norman Thompson N.1B was a pusher biplane, with two-bay equal-span wings that folded forwards for storage on board ship, with ailerons on both upper and lower wings. A single Hispano-Suiza engine mounted between the wings drove a four-blade propeller. While the specification required a single-seat aircraft, the Norman Thompson aircraft had a crew of two, seated in separate tandem cockpits ahead of the wings, giving rise to its alternative name of TNT (Tandem Norman Thompson). Β] Γ]

Construction of a single prototype, N37 was ordered by the Admiralty in April 1917, Β] first flying in October that year. Δ] Norman Thompson claimed that the aircraft had good performance, reaching a speed of 108 mph (174 km/h), but when the aircraft was officially tested at the Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot, performance was much less than that claimed by Norman Thompson, and did not meet the requirements of the specification. Ε] Ζ] No production of any of the aircraft designed against Specification N.1B followed, with the RNAS operating Sopwith Pup and Camel landplanes from flying-off platforms aboard ships, which did not require the carrier to heave to in order to lower a seaplane to the water. The Norman Thompson N.1B was struck off charge by October 1918.


Gallery

N16, the first N.1B, with a tail float and a humped cowl over the Vickers machine-gun.

. and a front three-quarter view of N16.

N17, the second N.1B, had longer floats and a modified engine cowling.


From my collection


เวสต์แลนด์ N.1B

เวสต์แลนด์ N.1B เป็นต้นแบบ อังกฤษ เดียวเครื่องยนต์ เครื่องบินน้ำ เครื่องบินรบ ของ สงครามโลกครั้งที่หนึ่ง เครื่องบินลำแรกที่จะได้รับการออกแบบโดย เวสต์แลนด์อากาศยาน มันเป็นหนึ่งเดียวเครื่องยนต์ รถแทรกเตอร์ เครื่องบิน แม้จะมีประสิทธิภาพที่ดี แต่ก็มีการสร้างเครื่องบินเพียงสองลำ แต่ Royal Naval Air Service ปฏิบัติการเครื่องบินรบจากเรือแทน

N.1B
บทบาท นักสู้
ชาติกำเนิด ประเทศอังกฤษ
ผู้ผลิต เครื่องบิน Westland
เที่ยวบินแรก สิงหาคม 2460
สถานะ ต้นแบบ
จำนวนที่สร้างขึ้น 2

ในปีพ. ศ. 2459 ทหารเรืออังกฤษ ได้ร่างข้อกำหนด N.1B สำหรับเครื่องบินลอยน้ำที่นั่งเดียวหรือ เครื่องบิน ขับไล่ เรือเหาะ เพื่อปฏิบัติการจาก เรือ บรรทุกเครื่องบิน ของ กองทัพเรือ โดยต้องการความเร็ว 110 ไมล์ต่อชั่วโมง (177 กม. / ชม.) และเพดานของ 20,000 ฟุต (6,100 ม.) สาม บริษัท ส่งออกแบบในการตอบสนอง, แบล็คเบิ และ มารีน กับเรือเหาะ (คน แบ N.1B และ รีเด็ก ) ในขณะที่เวสต์แลนด์เสนอเครื่องบินน้ำที่ เวสต์แลนด์ N.1B เวสต์แลนด์ได้รับคำสั่งซื้อเครื่องบินสองลำ [1]

การออกแบบของ Westland ซึ่งเป็นการออกแบบดั้งเดิมชิ้นแรกที่สร้างโดย Westland เป็นรถ สองชั้น แบบแทรคเตอร์ที่ ทำจากไม้ [1] มันมีลำตัวลึกลงไปในขณะที่ปีกสองอ่าวถูกออกแบบมาให้พับเพื่อประหยัดพื้นที่บนเรือและกำลังพอดีกับท้ายขอบ อวัยวะเพศหญิง มันขับเคลื่อนด้วย เครื่องยนต์โรตารี่ เบนท์ลีย์ AR1 เครื่อง เดียว (ต่อมารู้จักกันในชื่อ BR1 ) และถือ ปืนกลวิคเกอร์ ยิงไปข้างหน้าแบบ ซิงโครไนซ์ เพียง กระบอกเดียว ที่จมูกและ ปืนลูอิส ยิงที่ปีกด้านบน [2] [3] N.1B ตัวแรกติดตั้ง Sopwith ยาว 11 ฟุต (3.35 ม.) พร้อม ลอยหลักและหางยาว 5 ฟุต (1.52 ม.) ในขณะที่ N.1B ตัวที่สองยาวกว่ามาก (17 ฟุต 6 นิ้ว 5.34 ม.) ลอยหลักซึ่งขจัดความจำเป็นในการลอยหาง [4]

N.1B ลำแรก หมายเลขประจำเครื่อง N16 บินครั้งแรกโดย Harry Hawker จาก โรงงาน Yeovil ของ Westland ในเดือนสิงหาคม พ.ศ. 2460 [5] N.1B ทั้งสองลำได้รับการประเมินที่ คลังอากาศยาน Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot ในเดือนตุลาคม พ.ศ. 2460 [6] แสดงให้เห็นถึงความดี ประสิทธิภาพและการจัดการ [5] อย่างไรก็ตามในเวลานี้ Royal Naval Air Service กำลังดำเนินการ เครื่องบิน บน บก Sopwith Pup จากชานชาลาที่บินขึ้นบนเรือซึ่งไม่จำเป็นต้องให้ผู้ให้บริการขนส่งเพื่อที่จะลดเครื่องบินทะเลลงสู่น้ำและกำลังวางแผน เพื่อดำเนินการในลักษณะเดียวกันกับ Sopwith Camel และโปรแกรม N.1B ถูกยกเลิก [6]


Po válce

I když poslední 5F.1 používala ještě polská arm v roce 1920 proti Rusům, většina Dolphinů se ze skladů k bojišti nepřiblížila a ty, které se k pouhým čtyᖞm perutím během bojů dostaly, byly záhy po skonპní války vyᖚzeny. Dolphiny byly také prvními stroji samostatného kanadského letectva RCAF. I s několika dvoumístnými cvičnými letouny bylo nakonec vyrobeno 1778 kusů v𖇬h variant tohoto typu letounu.


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Comments:

  1. Isdemus

    Excuse me for what I'm here to interfere… recently. But they are very close to the theme. Ready to help.



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