John W. Weeks DD- 701 - History

John W. Weeks DD- 701 - History


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John W. Weeks DD- 701

John W. Weeks

(DD-701: dp. 2,200; 1. 376'6"; b. 40'; dr. 15'8", s. 34 k.
cpl. 336; a. 6 5", 12 40mm., 11 20mm., 2 act., 6 dcp.
10 21" tt.; cl. A11en M. Sumner)

John W. Weeks (DW701) was laid down 17 January 1944 by Federal Ship Building & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N.J.; launched 21 May 1944, sponsored by Mrs. John W. Davidge, daughter of Secretary Weeks, and commissioned 21 July 1944, Comdr. Robert A. Theobald, Jr., in command.

After shakedown out of Bermuda and tests en route to Argentina. Newfoundland the new destroyer departed New York 10 November 1944 escorting battleships Missouri (BB-63), Texas (BB-35), and Arkansas (BB 33) and escort carriers Shamrock Bay (CVE-84) and Wake Island (CVE - 5) to the Pacific. She transited the Panama Canal and touched San Francisco, Pearl Harbor, and l:niwetok before joining the 3d fleet at Ulithi 27 December.

Early in January 1945, John W. Weeks sortied from that busy lagoon with Vice Admiral John S. McCain Fast Carrier Task Force TF 38 and headed toward the Philippines in the screen of Rear Admiral Gerald F. Bogan's task
group meanwhile the mighty Luzon task force assembled in Leyte Gulf on New Year's Day, passed through Surigao Strait, and set course for Ling~ayen Gulf. On the 9th, as General MacArthur's troops stormed ashore on the beaches at Lingayen, pl~anes from McCain's carriers hit Japanese airstrips on Formosa and the Peseadores to neutralize air opposition to the Luzon invasion. That night McCain's ships slipped through Luzon Strait into the South China Sea where they could be on eall to support the Allied beachheads while striking strategic enemy positions along the southeastern coast of Asia and searching for the Imperial Fleet. In the next 10 days they lashed out at Hong Kong, Hainan, and the Indochinese coast causing much damage ashore and sinking 44 ships totaling 132,700 tons. At the end of this sweep into enemy waters Admiral Halsey reported, "the outer defenses of the Japanese Empire no longer include Burma and the Netherlands East Indies, those countries are now isolated outposts, and their products are no longer available to the Japanese war machine . ." John W. Weeks, proud of her role in this daring incursion into the South China Sea, returned with her carriers to Ulithi on the 28th.

The destroyer again sailed with the carriers 11 February, and conducted strikes on Tokyo 16 and 17 February in preinvasion support of the Allied attack on Iwo Jima. After inflieting considerable damage to Japanese air power, John TV. Weeks steamed toward Iwo Jima to give direct support to marines fighting for the island. Later that month the earriers renewed their attacks on the enemy's home islands. Heavy raids during Marchcontinued to cripple the enemy's power and the destroyer received credit for two assists as five enemy planes were splashed while attempting a raid on the Task Force.

When D-day for the Okinawa invasion neared, John W. Weeks in company with other units shelled the shores in preinvasion bombardment. The assault forces landed in 1 April and the destroyer stood by to offer support. On 7 April a Japanese surface force was located, and strikes were launched to intercept the enemy, resulting in the xinking of the battleship Yamato. During these operations the carrier Hancock (CV-19) was hit by a kamikaze and the destroyer rescued 23 survivors in a herole rescue mission.

For the remainder of the war, John W. Weeks participated in the final assault on the Empire Islands, engaging in radar picket duty, shore bombardment, rescue missions and the antishipping sweep off Tokyo Bay. Following the cessation of hostilities, she steamed into Tokyo Bay S September to begin escort operations with the occupation forces. She continued escort duty until 30 December when she sailed for home, arriving San Francisco 20 January 1946. The destroyer arrived Norfolk 19 February and following repairs she was inactivated 2¢ April.

One Year later, 17 May 1947, she sailed once again and commenced Naval Reserve training cruises until mid 1949. On 6 September of that year she sailed for Europe returning 8 February 1950. Weeks decommissioned 31 May 1950.

When the North Korean Oommunists invaded South liorea, President Truman ordered American forces into action to take up the challenge. Weeks recommissioned 24 October 1950 and commenced training cruises in the Atlantic and Caribbean. During her European Cruise January 1952, she participated in the attempt to save ill-fated Flying Enterprise which foundered and sank in a 90-mile gale 10 January 1952. The destroyer returned to Norfolk 6 February to engage in coastal operations and a midshipmen European cruise.

John W. Weeks sailed on an around the world cruise 3 November 1953, and while in the Far East she operated with units of the 7th Fleet off the coast of Rorea. She completed the cruise when she returned via the Mediterranean arriving Norfolk 4 June 1954. From 1954 to 1963 the destroyer operated with the Atlantic Fleet and during this period made five Mediterranean cruises and two NATO exercises

John W. Weeks was operating with the 6th Fleet during 1956 when a crisis erupted in the Mid East over the Suez Canal. The destroyer remained on patrol—a concretete symbol of American interest in a peaceful outcome. One year later on another Near Eastern deployment, John W. Weeks and other units stood by to prevent subversion of Jordan. The Mediterranean cruise of 1958 included patrol duty and exercises with navies of Bagdad-Pact countries. The destroyer was also active in U.S. vvaters, busy with midshipmen at-sea training and antisubmarine exercises. During 1959 she participated in Operation "Inland Seas" during the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Weeks was the first Navy destroyer to enter each of the Great Lakes. During this cruise she escorted HMY Britannia, with the Queen of England aboard, from Chicago to Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.

On 9 March 1960, the destroyer, in company with Ault (DD-698), transited the Bosporus, and the two became the first U.S. warships to enter the Black Sea since 1945. On the same cruise she rendezvoused with Triton at the end of the nuclear powered submarine's cruise round the world.

After returning to Norfolk, the destroyer visited the Caribbean and the New England Coast on midshipman training at sea. In the fall she deployed to the Mediterranean and returned to Norfolk 3 March 1962. Midshipman training in the summer and exercise out of Norfolk kept the ship in fighting trim and ready for action.

In October the presence of Soviet offensive missiles in Cuba prompted President Kennedy to order a quarantine of the island. Week' escorted replenishment ships to the quarantine area. When this display of national strength and determination forced the Kremlin to withdraw the missiles, John W. Weeks returned via San Juan, P.R., to Norfolk.

Early in 1963, while preparing for another Mediterranean doployment from February to April, the destroyer received the Battle Efficiency "E" for outstanding service. She headed for the Mediterranean 29 N ovember. The end of the year found her patrolling off troubled Cyprus, standing by ready to evacuate, if necessary, Americans from that strife-torn island. On Ne~v Year's Day en route to the Bed Sea to join that U.S. Middle East Force, she was the first ship to transit the Suez Canal during 1964. She visited Jidda, Saudi Arabia, Berbera Somali Republic, Aden, Aden Protectorate; Djibouti French Somaliland; Massawa, Ethiopia; and Karachi, Pakistan. She headed west from Karachi 6 February; refueled at Aden, then turned south for patrol along the Zanzibar coast during the revolution there, and off Iienya and Tanganyika during unrest in those countries. She departed Mombasa, Kenya, 24 February and transited the Suez Canal 6 March. After patrolling the Mediterranean John W. Weeks departed Pollenca Bay, Majorca, for home 12 May and reached Norfolk Oll the 23d.

After overhaul in Norfolk Naval Shipyard, the destroyer departed Hampton Roads 9 November for Guantanamo Bay and refresher training. She returned to Norfolk early in January 1965 to prepare for another Mediteranean cruise. She got underway 18 February and arrived Valencia, Spain, 5 March. She stopped at Naples for a fortnight en route to the Suez Canal and 2 months of duty in the Red Sea. Back in the Mediteranean 2 June, the destroyer headed for home 30 June and returned to Norfolk 12 July.

Late in tho summer, the destroyer was on the Gemini 5 recovery team. For the remainder of the year, she operated out of Norfolk in the Caribbean and along the Atlantic Coast. She continued ASW exercises in the Caribbean until returning to Nortolk 3 February 1966. After serving as sonar school ship at Key West during March and April, the veteran destroyer departed Norfolk 16 May for Fluropean waters.

Steaming with DesRon 2, John W. Weeks during the next 3 months cruised the western coast of Europe from Norway to France. She took part in ASW exercises, and during Operation "Straight Laced," a simulated invasion of the Norwegian coast, she operated with British and West German ships. While carrying out ASW duty during this exercise, she made the only simulated submarine kill in the operation 19 August. Departing Londonderry, Northern Ireland, 24 August, she.returned to Norfolk 2 September. During the remainder of the year she served as school ship at Key West and joined in ASW exercises along the Atlantic Coast and in the Caribbean.

John W. Weeks continued this duty until early in July 1967 when she departed Nortolk for deployment in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Steaming via San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Recife, Brazil, she touched at African ports on the east and west coasts of that continent and ranged Africa from the Gulf of Guinea to the Red Sea while cruising in the interest of peace and freedom.

John W. Weeks received four battle stars for World War II service.


John W. Weeks DD- 701 - History

USS John W. Weeks (DD-701), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, was named for John Wingate Weeks, who attained the rank of rear admiral. Weeks was elected to the United States House of Representatives where he served until entering the United States Senate in 1913. He became Secretary of War on 4 March 1921.

John W. Weeks was laid down on 17 January 1944 by Federal Ship Building & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey. The ship was launched on 21 May 1944 sponsored by Mrs. John W. Davidge, daughter of Secretary Weeks. The ship was commissioned on 21 July 1944, Commander Robert A. Theobald. Jr., in command.

After shakedown out of Bermuda and tests en route to Argentina, the new destroyer departed New York on 10 November 1944, escorting the battleships Missouri, Texas, Arkansas and aircraft carriers Shamrock Bay and Wake Island to the Pacific. She transited the Panama Canal and touched San Francisco, Pearl Harbor, and Eniwetok before joining the 3rd Fleet at Ulithi 27 December.

Early in January 1945, John W. Weeks sortied from that busy lagoon with Vice Admiral John S. McCain's Fast Carrier Task Force TF 38 and headed toward the Philippines in the screen of Rear Admiral Gerald F. Bogan's task group. Meanwhile, the mighty Luzon Attack Force assembled in Leyte Gulf on New Year's Day, passed through Surigao Strait, and set course for Lingayen Gulf. On 9 January, as General Douglas MacArthur's troops landed on the beaches at Lingayen, planes from McCain's carriers hit Japanese airstrips on Formosa and the Pescadores to neutralize air opposition to the Luzon invasion. That night McCain's ships slipped through Luzon Strait into the South China Sea where they could be on call to support the Allied beachheads while striking strategic enemy positions along the southeastern coast of Asia and searching for the Imperial Fleet. In the next 10 days, they lashed out at Hong Kong, Hainan, and the Indochinese coast causing much damage ashore and sinking 44 ships totaling 132,700 tons. At the end of this sweep into enemy waters Admiral William Halsey reported, "the outer defenses of the Japanese Empire no longer include Burma and the Netherlands East Indies those countries are now isolated outposts, and their products are no longer available to the Japanese war machine. " John W. Weeks returned with her carriers to Ulithi on 28 January.

The destroyer again sailed with the carriers on 11 February, and conducted strikes on Tokyo on 16–17 February, in preinvasion support of the Allied attack on Iwo Jima. After inflicting considerable damage to Japanese air power, John W. Weeks steamed toward Iwo Jima to give direct support to Marines fighting for the island. Later that month, the carriers renewed their attacks on the enemy's home islands. Heavy raids during March continued to cripple the enemy's power, and the destroyer received credit for two assists as five enemy planes were splashed while attempting a raid on the Task Force.

When D-day for the Okinawa invasion neared, Weeks in company with other units shelled the shores in preinvasion bombardment. The assault forces landed on 1 April, and the destroyer stood by to offer support. On 7 April, a Japanese surface force was located, and strikes were launched to intercept the enemy, resulting in the sinking of Yamato. During these operations, the aircraft carrier Hancock was hit by a kamikaze and the destroyer rescued 23 survivors in a heroic rescue mission.

For the remainder of the war, John W. Weeks participated in the final assault on the Empire Islands, engaging in radar picket duty, shore bombardment, rescue missions and the antishipping sweep off Tokyo Bay. Following the cessation of hostilities, she steamed into Tokyo Bay on 8 September to begin escort operations with the occupation forces. She continued escort duty until 30 December, when she sailed for home, arriving San Francisco on 20 January 1946. The destroyer arrived Norfolk, Virginia on 19 February and following repairs she was inactivated on 26 April.

One year later, on 17 May 1947, she sailed once again and commenced Naval Reserve training cruises until mid-1949. On 6 September of that year, she sailed for Europe, returning on 8 February 1950. John W. Weeks decommissioned on 31 May 1950.

At the beginning of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman ordered American forces into action to take up the challenge. John W. Weeks recommissioned on 24 October 1950 and commenced training cruises in the Atlantic and Caribbean. During her European cruise in January 1952, she participated in the attempt to save ill-fated Flying Enterprise, which foundered and sank in a 90-mile (140 km) gale on 10 January 1952. The destroyer returned to Norfolk on 6 February to engage in coastal operations and a midshipmen European cruise.

John W. Weeks sailed on an around the world cruise on 3 November 1953, and while in the Far East she operated with units of the 7th Fleet off the coast of Korea. She completed the cruise when she returned via the Mediterranean arriving Norfolk on 4 June 1954. From 1954 to 1963 the destroyer operated with the Atlantic Fleet and during this period made five Mediterranean cruises and two NATO exercises.

The destroyer was operating with the 6th Fleet during 1956 when the Suez crisis erupted over the canal. One year later, on another Near Eastern deployment, Weeks and other units stood by to prevent subversion of Jordan. The Mediterranean cruise of 1958 included patrol duty and exercises with navies of Baghdad Pact countries. The destroyer was also active in U.S. waters, busy with midshipmen at-sea training and antisubmarine exercises. During 1959 she participated in Operation "Inland Seas" during the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway. John W. Weeks was the first navy destroyer to enter each of the Great Lakes. During this cruise she escorted the royal yacht HMY Britannia, with Queen Elizabeth II of England aboard, from Chicago to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.

On 9 March 1960, John W. Weeks, in company with the destroyer Ault, transited the Bosporus and the two became the first U.S. warships to enter the Black Sea since 1945. On the same cruise she rendezvoused with Triton at the end of the nuclear-powered submarine's cruise round the world.

After returning to Norfolk, the destroyer visited the Caribbean and the New England coast on midshipman training at sea. In the fall she deployed to the Mediterranean and returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 3 March 1962. Midshipman training in the summer and exercise out of Norfolk kept the ship in fighting trim and ready for action.

In October, the presence of Soviet offensive missiles in Cuba prompted President John F. Kennedy to order a quarantine of the island (See Cuban Missile Crisis). John W. Weeks escorted replenishment ships to the quarantine area. When this display of national strength and determination forced the Kremlin to withdraw the missiles, John W. Weeks returned via San Juan, Puerto Rico, to Norfolk.

Early in 1963, while preparing for another Mediterranean deployment from February–April, the destroyer received the Battle Efficiency "E" for outstanding service. She headed for the Mediterranean on 29 November. The end of the year found her patrolling off troubled Cyprus, standing by ready to evacuate, if necessary, Americans from that strife-torn island. On New Year's Day, en route to the Red Sea to join that U.S. Middle East Force, she was the first ship to transit the Suez Canal during 1964. She visited Jidda, Saudi Arabia Berbera, Somali Republic, Aden, Aden Protectorate Djibouti, French Somaliland Massawa, Ethiopia and Karachi, Pakistan. She headed west from Karachi on 6 February refueled at Aden then turned south for patrol along the Zanzibar coast during the revolution there, and off Kenya and Tanganyika during unrest in those countries. She departed Mombasa, Kenya on 24 February and transited the Suez Canal on 6 March. After patrolling the Mediterranean, John W. Weeks departed Pollenca Bay, Majorca, for home on 12 May and reached Norfolk on 23 May.

After overhaul in Norfolk Naval Shipyard, the destroyer departed Hampton Roads on 9 November for Guantanamo Bay and refresher training. She returned to Norfolk early in January 1965 to prepare for another Mediterranean cruise. She got underway 13 February and arrived Valencia, Spain on 5 March. She stopped at Naples for a fortnight en route to the Suez Canal and 2 months of duty in the Red Sea. Back in the Mediterranean 2 June, the destroyer headed for home 30 June and returned to Norfolk 12 July.

Late in the summer, the destroyer was on the Gemini 5 recovery team. For the remainder of the year, she operated out of Norfolk in the Caribbean and along the Atlantic Coast. She continued ASW exercises in the Caribbean until returning to Norfolk on 3 February 1966. After serving as sonar school ship at Key West during March and April, the veteran destroyer departed Norfolk 16 May for European waters.

Steaming with DesRon 2, John W. Weeks spent the next 3 months cruising the western coast of Europe from Norway to France. She took part in anti-submarine warfare (ASW) exercises, and during Operation "Straight Laced," a simulated invasion of the Norwegian coast, she operated with British and West German ships. While carrying out ASW duty during this exercise, she made the only simulated submarine kill in the operation on 19 August. Departing Derry, Northern Ireland on 24 August, she returned to Norfolk on 2 September. During the remainder of the year she served as school ship at Key West and joined in ASW exercises along the Atlantic Coast and in the Caribbean.

John W. Weeks continued this duty until early in July 1967 when she departed Norfolk for deployment in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Steaming via San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Recife, Brazil, she touched at African ports on the east and west coasts of that continent and ranged Africa from the Gulf of Guinea to the Red Sea.

The destroyer departed from Norfolk, Virginia in January 1969 for duty off the coast of Vietnam. She operated with four aircraft carriers while there. She returned home in September 1969.

She was decommissioned and stricken on 12 August 1970, and finished her service as a gunnery target. She was sunk in the Atlantic Ocean off Virginia on 19 November 1970. Her final resting place is 1300 fathoms (7,800 feet 2,377 meters) down, at 37°10′54″N 073°45′36″W.

John W. Weeks received four battle stars for World War II service.


John W. Weeks DD- 701 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

USS JOHN W. WEEKS
(DD-701)

Named for naval officer, U.S. Senator, and Secretary of War John W. Weeks, the DD-701 was commissioned on 21 July 1944. By year’s end she was in the Pacific and early in January 1945 was headed with Task Force 38 for Luzon. As the U.S. Army stormed ashore at Lingayen, the WEEKS screened carriers for strikes against Japanese air strips on Formosa and the Pescadores and swept the South China Sea for enemy ships.

Her next screening mission was during strikes against Tokyo followed by gun fire support of the marines on Iwo in February. Back screening carriers in March, the WEEKS received credit for two assists during a raid on the task force. Her guns joined the pre-invasion bombardment of Okinawa. During strikes against the Japanese surface force on 7 April, the carrier HANCOCK (CV-19) was hit by a kamikaze and the crew of the WEEKS rescued twenty-three survivors in a heroic effort. The destroyer then went on to participate in the final assault on Japan’s home islands, engaging in radar picket duty, shore bombardment, rescue missions, and an anti-shipping sweep off Tokyo Bay. The WEEKS suffered only one casualty during World War II, that being Bruce Biggar who died in a friendly fire incident. Following the cessation of hostilities, she engaged in escort operations with the occupation forces until returning home at the end of December.

Inactivated during most of 1946, she was a naval reserve training ship operating out of Charleston and New Orleans between May 1947 and mid-1949. Following a European cruise, the WEEKS was decommissioned on 31 May 1950. North Korea’s invasion of South Korea brought the destroyer back to active duty on 24 October 1950. Over the next two years, she trained in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Mediterranean. In the mid-Atlantic in January 1952, she was the first to reach the ill-fated FLYING ENTERPRISE floundering in a gale. She took off all of her crew except for the captain, who remained aboard hoping to keep the vessel afloat. The WEEKS and the fleet tug TURMOIL shared the treacherous job of towing the ship. Ultimately, the captain was also taken off, and the ship foundered and sank.

DD-701 sailed on an around-the-world cruise in 1953 and 1954, with operations off the Korean coast while in the Far East. From 1954 to 1963, the WEEKS operated with the Atlantic Fleet, making five Mediterranean cruises and participating in two NATO exercises.

Operating with the Sixth Fleet in 1956 when the Suez Canal crisis erupted, she patrolled the Eastern Mediterranean to demonstrate the U.S. interest in a peaceful outcome. A year later, again in the Near East, the WEEKS was part of the force that stood by to prevent a government take-over in Jordan. A 1957 NATO exercise, a deployment to the Red Sea, and Baghdad Pact and Sixth Fleet exercises carried her into 1959. A midshipman training cruise took her to the Great Lakes for the summer of 1959 and the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway. On 9 March 1960, she and the AULT (DD-698) became the first U.S. warships to enter the Black Sea since 1945. In May, under sealed orders, the WEEKS rendezvoused with the TRITON (SSN-590) at the end of the submarine’s around-the-world cruise.

During refresher training in March 1961, the WEEKS rescued the cable schooner WESTERN UNION, which was being forced by the Cuban militia into the port of Baracoa. Later that year, while operating with the INDEPENDENCE (CVA-60) during fleet exercises, she rescued one of her pilots who was forced to ditch his disabled plane. Again while plane guarding the INDEPENDENCE, the WEEKS rescued another pilot, this time achieving the first successful night rescue of one of that carrier’s pilots. October 1962, the WEEKS escorted replenishment ships to the quarantine area during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

En route to the Mediterranean in November 1963, the WEEKS took aboard an injured man from a Greek merchant freighter and sped with him to Ponta del Gada, Azores. The end of 1963 found the destroyer patrolling off Cyprus, on stand-by for the possible evacuation of Americans from the strife-torn island. Steaming on into the Red Sea, she then turned south to patrol along the Zanzibar coast during a revolution there and disorders in Kenya and Tanganyika. She was back in Norfolk in May 1964. An overhaul, another Mediterranean deployment, and East Coast and Caribbean operations took her up to the summer of 1966 and a cruise to the North Atlantic. A highlight of 1967 was the destroyer’s deployment to the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans, with stops along the east and west coasts of Africa on her way back to the Middle East.

The WEEKS spent much of 1968 in a reduced operational status, preparing at year’s end for deployment to the Western Pacific. By March 1969, she was on Yankee Station in the Gulf of Tonkin.


DD 701 John W Weeks

John W. Weeks (DD-701) was laid down 17 January 1944 by Federal Ship Building & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N.J. launched 21 May 1944, sponsored by Mrs. John W. Davidge daughter of Secretary Weeks and commissioned 21 July 1944, Comdr. Robert A. Theobald, Jr., in command.

After shakedown out of Bermuda and tests en route to Argentina. Newfoundland. the new destroyer departed New York 10 November 1944 escorting battleships Missouri (BB-63), Texas (BB-35), and Arkansas (BB-33) and escort carriers Shamrock Bay (CVE 84) and Wake Island (CVE 65) to the Pacific. She transited the Panama Canal and touched San Francisco, Pearl Harbor, and Eniwetok before joining the 3dr fleet at Ulithi 27 December.

Early in January 1945, John W. Weeks sortied from that busy lagoon with Vice Admiral John S. McCain Fast Carrier Task Force TF 38 and headed toward the Philippines in the screen of Rear Admiral Gerald F. Bogan's task group. Meanwhile, the mighty Luzon Attack Force assembled in Leyte Gulf on New Year's Day, passed through Surigao Strait, and set course for Lingayen Gulf. On the 9th, as General MacArthur's troops stormed ashore on the beaches at Lingayen, planes from McCain's carriers hit Japanese airstrips on Formosa and the Pescadores to neutralize air opposition to the Luzon invasion. That night McCain's ships slipped through Luzon Strait into the South China Sea where they could be on call to support the Allied beachheads while striking strategic enemy positions along the southeastern coast of Asia and searching for the Imperial Fleet. In the next 10 days they lashed out at Hong Kong, Hainan, and the Indochinese coast causing much damage ashore and sinking 44 ships totaling 132,700 tons. At the end of this sweep into enemy waters Admiral Halsey reported, "the outer defenses of the Japanese Empire no longer include Burma and the Netherlands East Indies, those countries are now isolated outposts, and their products are no longer available to the Japanese war machine . . ." John W. Weeks, proud of her role in this daring incursion into the South China Sea, returned with her carriers to Ulithi on the 28th.

The destroyer again sailed with the carriers 11 February, and conducted strikes on Tokyo 16 and 17 February in preinvasion support of the Allied attack on Iwo Jima. After inflicting considerable damage to Japanese air power, John W. Weeks steamed toward Iwo Jima to give direct support to marines fighting for the island. Later that month the carriers renewed their attacks on the enemy's home islands. Heavy raids during March continued to cripple the enemy's power and the destroyer received credit for two assists as five enemy planes were splashed while attempting a raid on the Task Force.

When D-day for the Okinawa invasion neared, John W. Weeks in company with other units shelled the shore in preinvasion bombardment. The assault forces landed in 1 April and the destroyer stood by to offer support. On 7 April a Japanese surface force was located. and strikes were launched to intercept the enemy, resulting in the sinking of the battleship Yamato. During these operations the carrier Hancock (CV-19) was hit by a kamikaze the destroyer rescued 23 survivors in a heroic rescue mission.

For the remainder of the war, John W. Weeks participated Fated in the final assault on the Empire Islands, engaging in radar picket duty, shore bombardment, rescue mission and the antishipping sweep off Tokyo Bay. Following the cessation of hostilities, she steamed into Tokyo Bay 8 September to begin escort operations with the occupation forces. She continued escort duty until 30 December Shell she sailed for home, arriving San Francisco 20 January 1946. The destroyer arrived Norfolk 19 February and following repairs she was inactivated 26 April.

One year later, 17 May 1947, she sailed once again aid commenced Naval Reserve training cruises until mid 1949. On 6 September of that year she sailed for Europe returning 8 February 1950 John W. Weeks decommissioned 31 May 1950.

When the North Korean Communist invaded South Korea, President Truman ordered American forces into action to take up the challenge. John W. Weeks recommissioned 24 October 1950 and commenced training cruises in the Atlantic and Caribbean. During her European Cruise January 1952, she participated in the attempt to save ill-fated Flying Enterprise which foundered and sank in a 90-mile gale 10 January 1952. The destroyers returned to Norfolk 6 February to engage in coastal operations and a midshipmen European cruise.

John W. Weeks sailed on an around the world cruise November 1953, and while in the Far East she operated with units of the 7th Fleet off the coast of Korea. She completed the cruise when she returned via the Mediterranean arriving Norfolk 4 June 1954. From 1954 to 1963 the destroyer operated with the Atlantic Fleet and during this period made five Mediterranean cruises and two NAT0 exercises.

John W. Weeks was operating with the 6th Fleet during 1956 when a crisis erupted in the Mid East over the Suez Canal. The destroyer remained on patrol a concrete symbol of American interest in a peaceful outcome. One year later on another Near Eastern deployment. John W. Weeks and other units stood by to prevent subversion of Jordan. The Mediterranean cruise of 1958 included patrol duty and exercises with navies of Bagdad-Pact countries The destroyer was also active in U.S. waters, busy with midshipmen at-sea training and antisubmarine exercise. During 1959 she participated in Operation "Inland Seas during the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway. John W. Weeks was the first Navy destroyer to enter each of the Great Lakes. During this cruise she escorted HMY Britannia, with the Queen of England aboard, from Chicago to Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.

On 9 March 1960, the destroyer, in company with Ault (DD- 698), transited the Bosporus, and the two became the first U.S. warships to enter the Black Sea since 1945 On the same cruise she rendezvoused with Triton at the end of the nuclear powered submarine's cruise round the world.

After returning to Norfolk, the destroyer visited the Caribbean and the New England Coast on midshipman training at sea. In the fall she deployed to the Mediterranean and returned to Norfolk 3 March 1962. Midshipman training in the summer and exercise out of Norfolk kept the ship in fighting trim and ready for action.

In October the presence of Soviet offensive missiles in Cuba prompted President Kennedy to order a quarantine of the island. John W. Weeks escorted replenishment ships to the quarantine area. When this display of national strength and determination forced the Kremlin to withdraw the missiles, John Weeks returned via San Juan, P.R., to Norfolk.

Early in 1963, while preparing for another Mediterranean deployment from February to April, the destroyer received the Battle Efficiency "E" for outstanding service. She headed for the Mediterranean 29 November. The end of the year found her patrolling off troubled Cyprus, standing by ready to evacuate, if necessary, Americans from that strife-torn island. On New Year's Day en route to the Red Sea to join that U.S. Middle East Force, she was the first ship to transit the Suez Canal during 1964. She visited Jidda, Saudi Arabia Berbera, Somali Republic, Aden, Aden Protectorate Djibouti, French Somaliland Massawa, Ethiopia and Karachi, Pakistan. She headed west from Karachi 6 February refueled at Aden then turned south for patrol along the Zanzibar coast during the revolution there, and off Kenya and Tanganyika during unrest in those countries. She departed Mombasa, Kenya, 24 February and transited the Suez Canal 6 March After patrolling the Mediterranean John W.Weeks departed Pollenca Bay, Majorca, for home 12 May and reached Norfolk on the 23d.

After Overhaul in Norfolk Naval Shipyard, the destroyer departed Hampton Roads 9 November for Guantanamo Bay and refresher training. She returned to Norfolk early in January 1965 to prepare for another Mediterranean cruise. She got underway 18 February and arrived Valencia, Spain, 5 March. She stopped at Naples for a fortnight en route to the Suez Canal and 2 months of duty in the Red Sea. Back in the Mediterranean 2 June, the destroyer headed for home 30 June and returned to Norfolk 12 July.

Late in the summer, the destroyer was on the Gemini 5 recovery team. For the remainder of the year, she operated out of Norfolk in the Caribbean and along the Atlantic Coast. She continued ASW exercises in the Caribbean until returning to Norfolk 3 February 1966. After serving as sonar school ship at Key West during March and April, the veteran destroyer departed Norfolk 16 May for European waters.

Steaming with DesRon 2, John W. Weeks during the next 3 months cruised the western coast of Europe from Norway to France. She took part in ASW exercises, and during Operation "Straight Laced," a simulated invasion of the Norwegian coast, she operated with British and West German ships. While carrying out ASW duty during this exercise, she made the only simulated submarine kill in the operation 19 August. Departing Londonderry, Northern Ireland, 24 August, she returned to Norfolk 2 September. During the remainder of the year she served as school ship at Key West and joined in ASW exercises along the Atlantic Coast and in the Caribbean.

John W. Weeks continued this duty until early in July 1967 when she departed Norfolk for deployment in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Steaming via San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Recife, Brazil, she touched at African ports on the east and west coasts of that continent and ranged Africa from the Gulf of Guinea to the Red Sea while cruising in the interest of peace and freedom.

John W. Weeks received four battle stars for World War II service.


USS John W. Weeks DD-701

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Welcome to the USS John W Weeks DD-701 Guestbook Forum

Navy Emporium
Please view our commemorative USS John W Weeks DD-701 products in our Ship's Store!

James Fariello
Years Served: 1962-1966
This was a time period in my life when I remember being given the foundations for being a man.

George Cirish
Years Served: 1972

YN2 PA for Rescrew. Enjoyed the time at sea though brief while in New London.

Earl Wilson
Years Served: 1963-1965
Was leading Signalman (SM1) and left in 1965 to go to OCS. Signal gang consisted of Walt Hummel,Ben Magee, Stubblefield, Shakey Sloan and a few others.

mike webb
Years Served: 1962-1963
was aboard for the med cruise and the cuban crisis, assigned to the forward fire room

Paul R. Hetrick
Years Served: USN 1966-1970 USS John W. Weeks 1968-1970
Being part of the J.W.Weeks crew during our Vietnam tour of duty
in 1969 was one of my most rewarding navy experiences. I loved
my shipmates.

PETER PODUFAL
Years Served: 1963-1966
Med, Red Sea, North Atlantic, and Capitan Fitzgerald what a ship. Ping Jockey

Lonnie (Bo) Vause
Years Served: 1969-1971
Took Westpac tour 1969 was in deck division and made BM3 on board

Paul Fessenden
Years Served: 1965-1967
A GREAT EXPERIENCE, OIL SPILL WHILE REFUELING AT SEA, WATER SPOUT AT MIDNIGHT, Russian FISHING BOAT GETTING SMOKED BY ONE OF OUR ENSIGNS, CAUGHT HELL. : NATO CRUISE.

Steve Shubin
Years Served: 1965 - 1966
Viet Nam was anything but fun.

Walt Hummel
Years Served: six years
The Weeks was my first ship ,i went aboard early 64 and was onboard for 15 months,i loved it. Great crew and traveled far.

Charles E. Colitre
Years Served: 1964 - 1965
Joined John W. Weeks in GITMO in Dec 1964 as a LTJG to replace the DCA who had been transferred for medical reasons. Was transferred off in the Spring of 1965 when the former DCA rejoined the ship in Norfolk. Enjoyed my first experience in refresher training at GITMO. Great ship and CO, Capt. Fitzgerald, though my tour was brief.

Marcus Q. Berry
Years Served: 1966 1968
I went aboard the John W. Weeks in early 1966 where I served as a Gunners mate. I was in Mount 53. I was transferred as a GMG-3 to the USS Garcia DE 1040 in 1968, when the Weeks went into the Portsmouth Navy Ship Yards. I made the Middle East Cruise where I became a Shellback and then later a Golden Shellback.

William hutton
Years Served: 1960to1962
Bennie mcghee' remember hitch hiking to Detroit?

Larry Requarth
Years Served: 1962-1964
While aboard the Weeks it seemed like we were always at sea or in the Med. Did enjoy the Suez Canal passage and crossing the Equator. I went aboard an SA and left a RM2. I remember most of the Radio Gang, Bill Self, Kelly Brown, Rosekrans, Blount. Would not take anything for the time spent on The J.W.

steve tingley
Years Served: 1963-1966
RM3 anyone remember :D

S Bland
Years Served: none (non veteran)
Hello everyone, I am searching for my father, Herman Edward Beard. He served on DD 701 JW WEEKS as a cook on this ship. If anyone knows of his whereabouts or served with him, please contact my email address listed with this message. I would like to begin a new chapter with my father in my life. Thank you and may GOD bless.


Our Newsletter

Product Description

USS John W Weeks DD 701

"Personalized" Canvas Ship Print

(Not just a photo or poster but a work of art!)

Every sailor loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older his appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience gets stronger. A personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. It helps to show your pride even if a loved one is no longer with you. Every time you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart (guaranteed).

The image is portrayed on the waters of the ocean or bay with a display of her crest if available. The ships name is printed on the bottom of the print. What a great canvas print to commemorate yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her.

The printed picture is exactly as you see it. The canvas size is 8"x10" ready for framing as it is or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing. You also have the option to purchase a larger picture size (11"x 14") on a 13" X 19" canvas. The prints are made to order. They look awesome when matted and framed .

We PERSONALIZE the print with "Name, Rank and/or Years Served" or anything else you would like it to state (NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE). It is placed just above the ships photo. After purchasing the print simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed on it.

United States Navy Sailor YOUR NAME HERE Proudly Served Sept 1963 - Sept 1967

This would make a nice gift and a great addition to any historic military collection. Would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

The watermark "Great Naval Images" will NOT be on your print.

This photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high resolution printer and should last many years.

Because of its unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. The canvas print does not need glass thereby enhancing the appearance of your print, eliminating glare and reducing your overall cost.

We guarantee you will not be disappointed with this item or your money back. In addition, We will replace the canvas print unconditionally for FREE if you damage your print. You would only be charged a nominal fee plus shipping and handling.


DD 703 Wallace L Lind

Wallace L. Lind (DD-703) was laid down on 14 February 1944 by the Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N.J. launched on 14 June 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Wallace L. Lind and commissioned at the New York Navy Yard on 8 September 1944, Comdr. G. DeMetropolis in command.

Shakedown, which took Wallace L. Lind from the New York Navy Yard to Bermuda and back, extended through 2 November 1944. Departing Virginia en route to the Pacific on 14 November, she transited the Panama Canal on the 27th and arrived at Pearl Harbor on 13 December and underwent upkeep and training exercises. Wallace L. Lind and Tracy (DM-19) took leave of Hawaii on 23 December, escorting Enterprise (CV-6) to Ulithi. Tracy left the formation and proceeded to Eniwetok, and she was replaced by Frazier (DD-607).

On 5 January 1945, the destroyer made rendezvous with Fast Carrier Task Force 38 under Admiral W. F. Halsey, Commander, 3d Fleet in New Jersey (BB-62). Air strikes against Luzon began on 6 January 1945 and were followed by strikes against Formosa, Saigon, the Pescadore Islands, and Hong Kong. Photo reconnaissance planes surveyed Okinawa Gunto in preparation for the upcoming invasion. On 23 January, Wallace L. Lind left the area north of Luzon and arrived at Ulithi three days later for upkeep.

The destroyer reported for duty with Task Force (TF) 68, a fast carrier task force, on 11 February 1945. On 16 February, carrier planes conducted raids in the Tokyo area and, the following afternoon, retired toward Iwo Jima, with the carrier planes conducting air searches en route.

On 19 February 1945 the carriers launched aircraft as cover for the initial landing of troops on Iwo Jima. These operations continued through 25 February when strikes again commenced against Tokyo. During the above actions, Wallace L. Lind was assigned to screen the carriers and to assist in mail deliveries and transfer of personnel.

Wallace L. Lind's destroyer group departed the Honshu area on 27 February and set course for Okinawa, arriving four days later. On 1 March, this vessel acted as a plane guard for strikes against Okinawa and Minami Daito. Upon recovery of the strike planes, the task group set course for Ulithi, Caroline Islands.

After a period of routine upkeep, drydock, and availability, Wallace L. Lind set course for Kyushu where the first air strikes were launched on 18 March. Numerous enemy aircraft appeared sporadically throughout this first day. The second day saw strikes and sweeps against Kyushu targets, as well as a special sweep on Kii Suido. Two Japanese planes closed the formation, and the destroyer opened fire. Both planes were destroyed by gunfire.

Wallace L. Lind departed the area on 19 March. The destroyer temporarily joined a unit which proceeded to execute shore bombardment against Minami Daito on 28 March. The following day, strikes were launched against airfields on Kyushu. Lind exploded two floating mines and fired on an enemy torpedo plane which crashed shortly afterward. While commencing a southerly retirement, Wallace L. Lind executed a strike against Amami Gunto en route.

On 30 and 31 March 1945, strikes and sweeps over Okinawa Gunto provided cover for D-day landing operations. The operations in that area continued, with intermittent strikes against Amami Gunto and refueling and rearming operations, throughout April. On 7 April, dawn search planes reported contact with units of the Japanese Fleet consisting of one battleship (later identified as Yamato), two light cruisers, and eight destroyers. All available planes of the three task groups, totaling 380, were launched to make the strike. Upon their return, they reported sinking the battleship, both cruisers, and three destroyers. During the month of April, Wallace L. Lind destroyed two enemy planes and made three assists.

The month of May was spent participating in strikes against Okinawa Gunto, Kyushu, and the Amami O'Shima-Kikai Jima area. Wallace L. Lind performed various duties ranging from screening the carriers to recovering downed pilots. During these operations, Japanese kamikaze planes dove on TF 58, hitting both Enterprise (CV-6) and Bunker Hill (CV-17). The destroyer participated in one shore bombardment, sank three mines, shot down three Japanese planes, and had two assists.

This marked the end of a period of continuous steaming from 14 March 1945 when Wallace L. Lind started from Ulithi with TF 58 in support of the Okinawan occupation. On 1 June, Wallace L. Lind arrived at San Pedro Bay, Philippines, and went alongside Dixie (AD-14) for availability through 12 June. The remainder of June was spent in various training exercises and getting the ship ready for sea.

On 1 July 1945, Wallace L. Lind, in company with ships of Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 62, got underway from San Pedro Bay in advance of the heavy ships of Task Group (TG) 38.3 to provide an antisubmarine screen for their sortie. Nine days later, the vessel arrived at the area off the east coast of Honshu, Japan, and the task group launched strikes against the Tokyo plains area. Wallace L. Lind assumed duty as a picket station, then acted as a communication link between task groups. On 14 July 1945, she joined the carrier strikes on the east coast of Honshu and the northern Honshu-Hokkaido target area.

After refueling east of the Bonin Islands, Wallace L Lind returned to the operating area off the east coast of Kyushu on 24 July. She was then in position to act as a picket in the "Able Day" strikes against the Kure area. On 30 July, the task group launched strikes at air installations in the Tokyo-Nagoya area. The next day, the ships retired on a southerly course for replenishment. On 8 August, planes hit northern Honshu -end Hokkaido as well as the Tokyo plains area. Wallace L. Lind received official word that the war with Japan had ceased on 15 August 1945. The task group moved to the southeast of Tokyo with all ships taking precautions against attacking enemy aircraft which persisted, in some cases, despite the war's end.

On 1 September, the destroyer went alongside Shangri-La (CV-38) and took on board Vice Admiral John H. Towers and staff and then transported them to Tokyo Bay for the surrender ceremonies. Vice Admiral Towers shifted his flag from Shangri-La to Wallace L. Lind and, upon completion of the ceremonies the following day, returned to Shangri-La.

The destroyer took part in maintaining air patrols and searches over northern Japan in connection with the occupation, then, on 21 September, set course for Eniwetok. She underwent availability through 6 October and spent the remainder of the month in upkeep and training exercises in Tokyo Bay.

Wallace L. Lind and John W. Weeks (DD-701) departed Tokyo Bay on 31 October for Sasebo, Japan, where she spent the final months of 1945 operating between Sasebo and Okinawa. On 5 January 1946, the destroyer stopped briefly at Eniwetok before commencing her homeward journey. She arrived at her home port of Norfolk, Va., on 19 February 1946, after stopping at Pearl Harbor and San Francisco and transiting the Panama Canal.

From 9 March through 26 April, Wallace L. Lind underwent tender availability, a leave period, and training at Casco Bay, Maine. She then traveled to Charleston, S.C., where she underwent restricted availability and operated with John W. Weeks until 12 July when her home port was changed to New Orleans. Wallace L. Lind then empaneled Naval Reserve training cruises in the Caribbean. This type of operations characterized her activity for the next several years.

On 7 January 1949, the destroyer returned to Norfolk, Va., and conducted operations out of that port until 6 September. The next day, she made rendezvous with TF 89 and commenced a Mediterranean cruise which lasted through 26 January 1960 when she returned to Norfolk, Va.

Wallace L. Lind spent the greater part of 1950 engaged in training operations and a cruise to the Caribbean. On 6 September, the destroyer sailed for the Far East and the Korean War. The ship arrived off the coast of Korea on 13 October and centered her movements around Wonsan Harbor, then under siege with frequent interruptions for blockade patrol and bombardment missions in the vicinity of Songjin and Hungnam.

During the period 17 to 24 December, Wallace L. Lind took part as an active member of what was said by


He served in U.S. Navy in late WWII, recalled to service in Korean War

Korean War war veteran Paul Hofius possesses an impressive family legacy of military service dating back to the Revolutionary War and including later conflicts such as the War of 1812, the Civil War and World War I.

Many of his relatives were compelled into military service because of their country’s call to arms—an obligation that led to Hofius’ own service in the U.S. Navy during the waning days of World War II.

“I received my draft notice (in 1945) after beginning my senior year at Sharpsville High School in Pennsylvania,” said the veteran.

“I decided to go ahead and enlist in the Navy since my family used to visit Lake Eerie and I liked being around the water,” he added.

After graduating in late spring 1946, Hofius was sent to boot camp at Bainbridge, Maryland, and from there received assignment to the USS John W. Weeks—an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer named for a former Secretary of War.

When arriving at his new duty station, Hofius was among a group of newly trained sailors questioned by a chief boatswain’s mate whether any of them knew how to type.

Although none immediately admitted they possessed such ability, a fellow sailor professed that Hofius had such skills.

Completing his initial training at Bainbridge, Maryland, Hofius performed administrative duties on two separate destroyers from 1946-1948. Courtesy of Paul Hofius.

“I guess it all worked out because they assigned me to administrative tasks in the ship’s office for my duty,” he grinned.

The USS John W. Weeks remained in port at Charleston, South Carolina, and on January 1, 1947, was assigned to a new destroyer squadron.

Five weeks later, the ship sailed to the Naval Ammunition Depot in North Charleston to take on ammunition for use in various maneuvers and tactical exercises in the Atlantic during the weeks that followed.

“It was after World War II had ended and many of the experienced sailors were already discharged,” he said. “There were a lot of new sailors with no experience and these exercises were used to teach them their duties.”

As Hofius recalled, their homeport was changed from the Naval Minecraft Base in Charleston to the Naval Repair Base in New Orleans in March 1947.

Since their new base was located 321 miles up the river, it was a leisurely journey to the Gulf of Mexico and back since they had to travel slowly as not to create large wakes on the shoreline.

“The skipper of our ship was a very interesting officer,” explained the former sailor.

“During one inspection of the ship’s firemen, he walked by the sailors who were standing in a line along the deck, stopped in front of each sailor and then threw their sailor’s hat overboard.”

Shaking his head, Hofius concluded, “He never explained why he did it but they all seemed to think their hats were either too small or in bad condition.”

The U.S. Navy destroyer USS John W. Weeks (DD-701) during a highline transfer with the battleship USS Wisconsin (BB-64), in the 1950s. Korean War

During the summer months, the USS John W. Weeks participated in a number of two-week training cruises to locations such as Jamaica and Cuba to help train Naval Reservists.

In late 1947, Hofius was detailed to work for the commander of the Destroyer Division 162, and was transferred to the destroyer USS Wallace L. Lind.

“While working for the commander on the Lind, I did a lot of clerical duties such as recordkeeping,” he said.

His two-year commitment ended when he was sent to U.S. Naval Air Station at Pensacola, Florida, receiving his discharge in June 1948.

While there, he was encouraged to join the Inactive Naval Reserve for four years after being advised that if another war broke out, he would maintain his rate (career field) and be the last recalled to service.

“I had returned to Pennsylvania and was working at a local Westinghouse plant when the Korean War broke out,” Hofius explained. “I was recalled into the Navy and I did maintain my rate, but I was not one of the last called back to active duty.”

A native of Pennsylvania, Paul Hofius enlisted in the Navy and served on destroyers during the latter part of WWII. He was recalled to service during the Korean War and stationed at a naval base in Virginia. Courtesy of Jeremy P. Amick

Returning to active duty for the Korean War on April 20, 1951, he reported to the Naval Air Station in Norfolk, Virginia, where he spent the next 17 months processing discharges, enlistment extensions and reenlistments for enlisted personnel. Following his discharge on September 16, 1952, he returned to Pennsylvania and enrolled in college.

“I married my fiancée, Noreen, in 1953, and I went on to earn my degree in industrial management through Ohio State University,” he said. “I have to say, I was glad to have been in the service because it made it much easier to get an education and it paid for virtually my entire degree.”

As the years passed, Hofius and his wife raised five children while he went on to complete a lengthy career with the Westinghouse Corporation.

His employment eventually resulted in his transfer to Jefferson City, Missouri, where he retired in 1988.

The years have been filled with many wonderful experiences for the veteran, but more recently, in 2017, he encountered a resurgence of memories related to his military service during a Central Missouri Honor Flight trip.

“Initially, I was hesitant go on the Honor Flight but was encouraged to do so by friends and family—and I am glad that I went!” he exclaimed. “It was really worthwhile to travel to Washington, D.C., and see all the war memorials and it brought back a lot of memories for me.”

With a broad grin, he added, “One of the best parts of the Honor Flight was being there … seeing all the sites with those who had also served.

Being in their company during those moments we visited the memorials was truly something special.”


New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center

The State of New York, the Division of Military and Naval Affairs and the New York State Military Museum are not responsible for the content, accuracy, opinions or manner of expression of the veterans whose historical interviews are presented in these videos. The opinions expressed by those interviewed are theirs alone and not those of the State of New York.

The New York State Military Museum cannot provide individual copies of these interviews.

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Theater

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Notes

Interviewed by NYS Military Museum in 2001

Interviewed by Hudson Falls H.S. Hudson Falls, NY

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