15cm sFH13/1(Sf) auf Geschutzwagen Lorraine Schlepper (f)

15cm sFH13/1(Sf) auf Geschutzwagen Lorraine Schlepper (f)



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15cm sFH13/1(Sf) auf Geschutzwagen Lorraine Schlepper (f)

The 15cm sFH13/1(Sf) auf Geschutzwagen Lorraine Schlepper (f) was a self-propelled mount for a 15cm gun, using the chassis of a French armoured vehicle. This example is being examined by Wendell Willkie in North Africa, having driven less than 1000km before being abandoned.

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History [ edit | edit source ]

The gun was a development of the previous standard howitzer, the 15 cm sFH 02. Improvements included a longer barrel resulting in better range and a gun shield to protect the crew. Variants were: the original "kurz" (L/14 – 14 calibre short barrel version), the lg. sFH13 with a longer barrel and lg. sFH13/02 with minor modifications to simplify wartime manufacture of the lg. sFH weapons. Initially there were serious issues of weak recoil spring mechanisms that would break, and gun barrel explosions. The problems were solved with the upgrades. Ώ]

The British referred to these and their shells as "5 point 9"s or "5ى"s as the bore was 5.9 inches (150 mm). The ability of these guns to deliver mobile heavy firepower close to the frontline gave the Germans a major firepower advantage on the Western Front early in World War I, as the French and British lacked an equivalent. It was not until late 1915 that the British began to deploy their own 6 inch 26 cwt howitzer.

About 3,500 of these guns were produced from 1913 to 1918. ΐ] They continued to serve in the Reichswehr and then the Wehrmacht in the interwar period as the standard heavy howitzer until the introduction of 15 cm sFH 18 in the 1930s. They were then shifted to reserve and training units, as well as coastal artillery. Guns turned over to Belgium and the Netherlands as reparations after World War I were taken into Wehrmacht service after the conquest of the Low Countries as the 15 cm sFH 409(b) and 406(h) respectively.

In the course of World War II about 94 of these howitzers were mounted on Lorraine 37L tractors to create self-propelled guns, designated 15 cm sFH13/1 (Sf) auf Geschuetzwagen Lorraine Schlepper (f).


LgsFH 13 (Sfl) auf Lorraine-Schlepper

Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 10/08/2018 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

The conquer of France by Germany in World War 2 (1939-1945) yielded the victors a grand amount of war booty. Among the loot was the fleet of newly-minted French Lorraine tracked vehicles. Due to need, the German Army reconstitute these vehicles and generated a new line of Self-Propelled Artillery (SPA) platforms designated "LgsFH 13 (Sfl) auf Lorraine-Schlepper". The vehicles emerged from conversion in 1942 and fought into 1944. The concern of Alkett was charged with the modification of some thirty initial vehicles. Speed in production was of the essence for General Rommel required SPAs in some number for his campaign across North Africa.

The reliable Lorraine tracked chassis was fitted with the proven, manually-aimed 15cm sFH 13/1 series heavy field howitzer and a relatively basic superstructure was set over the rear of the vehicle. This structure was open-topped and provided only limited protection for the gunnery crew. A driver took his position within the hull as normal with the gunnery crew numbering three within the superstructure. Dimensions included a length of 5.3 meters, a width of 1.8 meters and a height of 2.2 meters. While tall, the vehicle was quite narrow which presented a smaller target to hit from the frontal profile. Weight was 8.5 tons. Eight total 150mm rounds were carried on the vehicle proper and no self-defense machine gun was installed. The tank did, however, carry the FuG Spr 1 series radio kit. An anchor spade was attached to the rear hull and this was lowered when the vehicle fired so as to help absorb the violent recoil effects of the action - in turn reducing the strain on the track components and chassis.

Drive power was had from the original French DelaHaye 103TT six-cylinder engine developing 70 horsepower at 2,800rpm. Road speeds reached 21 miles per hour and ranges were out to 84 miles on road (55 miles cross-country).

Within the span of just one month, the company completed all thirty of the requested gun platforms and these were quickly shipped across the Mediterranean - though seven of the lot was lost during the journey. Once in theater, the SPAs acquitted themselves quite well under Rommel's direction despite the operating temperatures and terrain - a testament to the original French mechanical workmanship and overall design.

In July of 1942, an additional sixty-four of the type were ordered and their conversions handled by the German Army itself. Changes included a longer ground spade assembly that could be lowered from the within vehicle (original models required the spade to be manually lowered from outside the vehicle). These saw combat service along the West Front, in particular during the Normandy Invasion of June 1944, though, before the end of the year, losses were such that only a single unit remained in service.


New: 15cm sFH auf Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Having risked Allied air and patrol boat attack and avoided sinking in the Mediterranean, the 15cm sFH auf Lorraine Schlepper(f) arrives to join your Afrika Korps and to take on Montey’s Desert Rats!

The Lorraine 37L, or Tracteur de ravitaillement pour chars 1937 L (“Tank Supply Tractor 1937 L”), was a light tracked armoured vehicle developed by the Lorraine company pre 1940.

Approximately 360 Lorraine tractors fell into German hands during the invasion of France. These captured vehicles were renamed the Lorraine Schlepper(f) and initially used in their original role of ammunition carrier.

Having proven particularly reliable, and well suited to mobile tactics, it wasn’t long before the chassis was used for conversions. The first batches of the 15cm sFH were expedited to the desperately under strength Afrika Korps, first seeing action during Rommel’s final attempt to break through the El Alamein defenses on 30 August 1942.

1942 also saw Major Alfred Becker directed the conversion of some 170 of these vehicles into the 7.5 cm PaK40/1 auf Geschuetzwagen Lorraine Schlepper(f) (Marder I), and 106 into self-propelled artillery: 94 into the 15 cm sFH13/1 (Sf) auf Geschuetzwagen Lorraine Schlepper(f) and 12 into the 10.5 cm leFH18(Sf) auf Geschuetzwagen Lorraine Schlepper(f).
These conversions saw further action across Normandy during the invasion within a variety of units, normally attached in 3’s to infantry regiments.

In Bolt Action


Cost: 132pts (inexperienced), 155pts (Regular), 178pts (Veteran).
Weapons: 1 forward-facing heavy howitzer.
Damage value: 7+ (armoured carrier).
Special Rules: Open-topped

Use these mighty guns by sitting tight in a good defensive position and pound the enemy! Of course, the big advantage is that you’re mobile and can therefore go looking for the perfect position to park and annihilate your chosen part of the battlefield!
Just remember to protect your choice weapon from those potential threats with a unit of troops nearby.


Add a Battery of Self Propelled Artillery to your armies

Using the rules form the Bolt Action supplement Tank War allows you to field 3 vehicles as a platoon, Adding these 3 to a German Infantry army would be thematic and a very valuable, and devastating, support as you press your attack!


15 cm sFH auf Lorraine Schlepper(f)

While we hold as much stock as possible, on occasion this product may need to be cast especially for you by our expert staff. If your order includes this item, it may take a few more days before we ship it.

Having risked Allied air and patrol boat attack and avoided sinking in the Mediterranean, the 15cm sFH auf Lorraine Schlepper(f) arrives to join your Afrika Korps and to take on Montey's Desert Rats!

The Lorraine 37L, or Tracteur de ravitaillement pour chars 1937 L ("Tank Supply Tractor 1937 L"), was a light tracked armoured vehicle developed by the Lorraine company pre 1940.

Approximately 360 Lorraine tractors fell into German hands during the invasion of France. These captured vehicles were renamed the Lorraine Schlepper(f) and initially used in their original role of ammunition carrier.

Having proven particularly reliable, and well suited to mobile tactics, it wasn't long before the chassis was used for conversions. The first batches of the 15cm sFH were expedited to the desperately under strength Afrika Korps, first seeing action during Rommel’s final attempt to break through the El Alamein defenses on 30 August 1942.

1942 also saw Major Alfred Becker directed the conversion of some 170 of these vehicles into the 7.5 cm PaK40/1 auf Geschuetzwagen Lorraine Schlepper(f) (Marder I), and 106 into self-propelled artillery: 94 into the 15 cm sFH13/1 (Sf) auf Geschuetzwagen Lorraine Schlepper(f) and 12 into the 10.5 cm leFH18(Sf) auf Geschuetzwagen Lorraine Schlepper(f).

These conversions saw further action across Normandy during the invasion within a variety of units, normally attached in 3's to infantry regiments.

Models supplied unassembled and unpainted

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10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by Davide Pastore » 02 Mar 2008, 10:36

According to Chamberlain & Doyle, Encyclopedia of German Tanks of World Wat Two, the ninety-four 15cm sFH13/1(Sf) auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f), and the twelve 10.5cm leFH18(Sf) auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f), were built "for special operations under Rommal in North Africa" and "first issued to the Panzerartillerie Abteilung of the 21st Panzer Division in North Africa".

1) did other units received them?

3) how many vehicles were sent to Africa, and when?

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by phylo_roadking » 02 Mar 2008, 16:56

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by Davide Pastore » 02 Mar 2008, 17:01

I trust more the printed source. Particularly since Chamberlain & Ellis' work is usually regarded as the Holy Scriptures in their field.

According to the source, 60 chassis were ordeder to be converted to 10,5cm carriers in May 1942, but 48 of them were completed as 7,5cm PaK (Marder I).

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by jmehner » 03 Mar 2008, 10:58

I would not put too much trust in Chamberlain/Ellis either, their work is dated and much of the information contained is not up-to-date in many aspects- it gets reprinted on a regular basis, but not edited.

For my money, Jentz and Spielberger are usually good.

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by Davide Pastore » 03 Mar 2008, 14:10

OK, anyway, the correct number of vehicles built is a secondary matter to me, compared to my initial questions about employment in Africa. Can anyone help?

(I'm fairly sure some 15cm reached Africa, and this is not based on Chamberlain & Ellis alone)

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by TadPortly » 03 Mar 2008, 17:24

I'm fairly certain that a 150mm version is preserved in an "as found" condition at the Museum at El Alamein. The following link also shows at least 7 of the 150mm version captured after the battle:

I seem to recall that some of the 150mm Lorraine Schleppers were sunk en route to Africa.

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by phylo_roadking » 03 Mar 2008, 18:35

Dvaide, I know this is going to sound like very circumstantial eveidence in "court" terms LOL but - how good was Allied intelligence on what the Wehrmacht had in the field?

because there's a piece of cricumstantial evidence that might support the construction of more than the dozen 10.5cm Lorraines sent to North Africa.

the US Army Manual TM-E 30-451: Handbook on German Military Forces published in March 1945 lists the

. as being available to the Wehrmacht. If only twelve were produced and sent to Rommel, then I doubt that entry would be in there?

I note they have the same caveat as me above, that being "intelligence" it may not be accurate or complete, but it's still an interesting entry to note, as I would assume a manual edition issued as late as March '45 would include vehicles met on the mainland of Europe.

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by Davide Pastore » 03 Mar 2008, 19:52

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by phylo_roadking » 03 Mar 2008, 20:35

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by Davide Pastore » 03 Mar 2008, 21:23

This they could not know until the end of the war.

BTW, upon further reflection, that intelligence booklet in itself doesn't prove any 10.5cm was ever sent to Africa: they could have met them in France in 1944.

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by phylo_roadking » 04 Mar 2008, 00:59

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by phylo_roadking » 04 Mar 2008, 01:03

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by phylo_roadking » 04 Mar 2008, 01:21

So if we can account or that "54" in Western Europe in 1944, we're only astray by ten.

NOTE - he finished off his post with THIS

. so no 10.5 leFH16(sf) auf GW LS(f) in North Africa as far as he was concerned.

He's later corrected to Art. Regs. 33 and 155, none going to 190.

Re: 10.5cm & 15cm auf Gw Lorraine Schlepper(f)

Post by phylo_roadking » 04 Mar 2008, 01:28

It was originally planned to issue 12 to AR 155(21PD), 12 to AR 33(15PD) and 6 to 90.leDiv for the 30 total.

However 3 were lost in transit in July 1942 and 4 in August leaving only 23 that reached Libya.

AR 155(21PD) received the first 10 to land in Tobruk and the division reported on 26 July 1942 they were on their way to the front.

AR33(15PD) reported that 2 left Tobruk om 17 August 1942 and 9 on 20 August 1942 for the front.

The last 2 arrived at Tobruk on 24 August 1942 and were two late to reach the front for the attack at El Alamein.

On 1 October 1942 the 15PD reported 8 available and the 21 PD reported 11 available. On 23 October 1942 when the British launched their attack on the German defenses at El Alamein the two divisions reported 19 available. All were reported lost by 2 December 1942.

The 15PD reported their losses as:
3 lost on 26 October
1 on 27 October
1 on 30 October
2 on 3 November
1 on 8 November


German Tanks And Military Vehicles Of The Second World War

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Modules

Engines

Suspensions

Radios

Compatible Equipment

Compatible Consumables

Player Opinion

Pros and Cons

  • Good alpha damage
  • Reasonable accuracy
  • Good splash damage and splash radius for a Tier 5 SPG
  • High shell trajectory
  • Good camouflage value
  • Short range (840m)
  • Very sluggish muzzle velocity (slow shell speed)
  • Low rate of fire
  • Small gun traverse arc

Performance

The Grille starts off as a low damage SPG with high RoF (rate of fire). Getting the larger gun, however, changes its play style completely. Compared to other lower tier SPG's, the Grille is where you start to see a massive increase in alpha damage. Direct hits are lethal to light tanks, TD's, mediums, and other SPG's if you can only land them. Heavy tanks will also suffer greatly or die from a direct impact, often losing a large percentage of their health or all of their health as well as a module or two. Of course if you miss you won't do any damage better than 80 HP. The Grille does not reflect on the German SPG philosophy in terms of accuracy, but its still a good deal more accurate than other nations SPG´s.

The Grille's high damage can make it an effective TD or scout destroyer, though it lacks the traverse speed (turning speed) for close-quarters combat. Also, when taking shots from enemy tanks, the first module in the line of fire is the engine, and getting forced to stop due to engine damage is not uncommon, which combined with pathetic gun traversal arc means swift death.


Feldgrau.net

This "French" Geschutzwagen Lorraine Schlepper was used in N.Africa by 21st Panzer Division. Presumably in 155th Artillerie Regiment. But does any one know in which Abteilung(en) they served, how many there were & when they arrived.
I have 6 - 12 & after August 1942 but not from any reliable sources.

Post by David W » Wed Jan 26, 2005 3:21 am

Post by Martin Block » Wed Jan 26, 2005 3:28 pm

A total of 30 "Lg.s.F.H. 13 (Sfl.) auf Lorraine-Schlepper" were completed by Allkett in June 1942. 12 each were to be issued to the 15. and 21. Pz.Div., 6 to 90. le.Div. in North Africa.
During transit 7 were sunk while crossing the Mediteranean Sea, so that only 23 made it to Africa.
The first 10 were given to 21. Pz.Div. in late Jul 1942 and formed the 'Sfl.Bttr./Pz.Art.Rgt. 155 (no number and not assigned to a specific Abteilung). The next 11 were given to the 15. Pz.Div. in mid August and formed the 'Sfl.Bttr./Pz.Art.Rgt. 33. The last 2 made it to Africa in late August. It appears they went to 15. Pz.Div. to replace the 3 total losses during the period from 30 Aug to 3 Sep, 1942.
Sfl.Bttr./Pz.Art.Rgt. 155 had lost all guns by 2 Dec and Sfl.Bttr./Pz.Art.Rgt. 33 by 8 Nov, 1942.

This info is taken from 'Rommel's Funnies' by T.L. Jentz

Post by David W » Thu Jan 27, 2005 12:56 am

Additional Data

Post by Ron Klages » Thu Feb 17, 2005 1:35 pm

Here is some additional information on the 15cm sFH 13/1(Sf) sent to North Africa in addition to the information provided by Martin.

On 4 July 1942 the HQ of PanzerArmee Afrika received a message that thirty 15cm sFH 13/1(Sf) would arrive in Africa soon. In fact ten of them had already been loaded on the ship APUNIA in Naples. There were another ten that were in Brindisi and were aboard three different ships:

Three on PISANI
Four on PILO
Three on SESTRIERE

The last ten vehicles were in-route from Germany to Italy on 4 July 1942. It appears that these were broken up into shipments of 4-4-2.

The first ten aboard the Italian ship APUNIA arrived safely in Tobruk and were assigned to PAR 155 of the 21.PD. In July three vehicles were lost at sea and in August another 4 were lost at sea. I am still trying to determine which ships were sunk and how.

It appears that the remaining 13 were given to PAR 33 of the 15.PD, eleven initially and then the last two to replace those three lost the night of 30/31 August 1942. It also appears that the two damaged that night were probably never repaired.

The initial vehicles had their baptism of fire during the attempt of Rommel to break through the British defenses at El Alamein. The Germans lost several self-propelled guns in the course of the assault on the night of 30/31 August 1942 and on 3 September the 15.PD reported that three 15cm sFH 13/1(Sf) had been lost and two damaged.

On 1 October 1942 the PAR 33 of the 15.PD reported having eight 15cm sFH 13/1(Sf) available while the 21.PD reported having eleven 15cm sFH 13/1(Sf) available.

The PAR 33 lost
three on 26 October
one on 27 October
one on 30 October
two on 3 November
one on 8 November

Similar information from PAR 155 is not available other than they had lost all of their 15cm sFH 13/1(Sf) by 2 December 1942.

Several of these vehicles were captured by the Allies and one was sent to the US and to the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland. I believe it is still there today.

I should also note that a second production [another 60] of these vehicles were produced by Baukommando Becker and were used to form two armored artillery regiments on 1 November 1942:

Gepanzerte Artillerie-Regiment 1 (Sfl)
Gepanzerte Artillerie-Regiment 2 (Sfl)

Each of these had 5 batteries each with 6 guns per KStN 461(a).

Gepanzerte Artillerie-Regiment 1 (Sfl) was disbanded in December 1942 with its guns being distributed to other units stationed in France and western Europe.

Gepanzerte Artillerie-Regiment 2 (Sfl) was reorganized and renamed on 12 March 1943 as Gepanzerte Artillerie-Regiment 931 (Sfl) and then on 4 July 1943 it was reorganized and renamed as Panzer-Artillerie-Regiment 155 for the rebuilding of the 21. Panzer-Division in France that had been lost in Tunisia in May 1943. History had come full circle for PAR 155.

On 6 June 1944 when the Allies landed in Normandy they were still as many as 24 vehicles in the 21. PD. PAR 155 had 12 while PGR 125 had six as did PGR 192. The 21. PD lost three vehicles in June 1944 and nine in July 1944. By 1 September 1944 the division reported having only one vehicle remaining. This single vehicle remained on the books of the division into December1944.

The vehicle had a slow rate of fire, a small ammunition load carried of only 8 rounds and it’s speed was too slow [8km/hour] preventing it from close cooperation with the panzers and other German mobile forces.


Landships II

As I am a first time user I hope that I get this post correct.

The Tenterfield RSL Sub Branch NSW, is researching the history of a WW1 150mm Howitzer German Artillery gun which is displayed in Tenterfield as part of the 1914 - 1918 Allotment of War Trophies and ws originally ceded to Armidale in NSW. This gun was manufactured in 1916 by Friedrich Krupp AG in Essen, Germany. Bearing a stamped field number of Nr.1517 see attached photos.

As discussed we are seeking information on the following as the AWM does not seem to hold this information:

1. It would appear that it was captured by the 12 th LH Regiment, would this be correct?

2. Is there information on a date it was captured?

3. Is there information on the location it was captured?

4. is there information on how it ended up in Tenterfield and when ?

Would this gun have been provided to the Ottoman Turks and is there information available on this?

If it was provided to the Turks is there any information on the Turkish Unit it may have been issued to?

I note in previous posts that "CharlieC" has noted that there is a possibility of gaining in information from the Krupp Archive. Is the a website or contact details for the Krupp Archive that you may be able to provide.

The 15cm sFH13 #1517 was allocated to the 12th Light Horse at Armidale as a war trophy gun in Australia. There were three broad groups of allocated guns

in 1920-21: to towns/cities that applied for a gun as a war memorial to units in the AIF (usually allocated to the depot of a unit) selected guns to museums.

The gun allocated to Armidale seems to have been one of the second category.

There's no indication in the AWM records of the guns that were returned to Australia where the gun was captured or which unit captured it. The lack of specific information

often means the gun was collected during cleanup of the battlefield and wound up in a gun park in Egypt before being sent to Australia.

The Ottomans were given a fair number of 15cm sFH13s during WW1. The story of German 15cm howitzers in Ottoman service is quite tangled being a succession of small orders

of 15cm Krupp export howitzers, some Krupp prototype howitzers, 15cm sFH model 1893, 15cm sFH13 short and long barrel as well as indigenous production of the 15cm Krupp export howitzer.

The Krupp archive was mostly destroyed in WW2 so there is only very limited information available.

Perhaps the historical societies in Tenterfield or Armidale can help with the history of the howitzer.

Thank you very much for your prompt response.

Could you please respond to the following questions:

1. 15cm sFH13 - What is the meaning of sFH13? As I thought this was a L14? Is this number stamped on the gun somewhere? 13 or 14 - How is this determined?

2. Is your response that it may have ended up in a gun park in Egypt, is your response based on the movements of the 12th Light Horse?

3. Is there any way of confirming that #1517 was sent to the Ottomans by researching the orders and despatches from the Krupp factory?

4. How would I be able to access the remaining Krupp archive?

5. Would you or one of your members be a able to provide me with a Hi Res suitable copy of a photo of the same type of gun in action during WW1 as we wish to use it as the background for a good sized interpretative panel for display with the gun. I attached some photos of what I believe reflect similar guns as #1517 from the internet. Any advice on a suitable photo would be appreciated.

I am currently researching further available archives from Tenterfield and Armidale and will provide you with any information that comes to hand.


Watch the video: lego ww1: 15 cm Sfh 13 howizer