Dwight D. Eisenhower is born

Dwight D. Eisenhower is born


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Future president Dwight D. Eisenhower is born in Denison, Texas on October 14, 1890.

After graduating from West Point in 1915, Eisenhower embarked on a stellar military career–he would eventually become the supreme commander of Allied forces in Europe during World War II and the leader of the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Following the war, “Ike,” as he was affectionately called, served as president of Columbia University until 1951, when he became supreme commander of NATO forces in Europe. The next year, Eisenhower beat out Democrat Adlai Stevenson to become president of the United States.

The Cold War and a determination to prevent the spread of communism permeated Eisenhower’s foreign and domestic policies. During his first term, Eisenhower oversaw the end of the Korean War (1950 – 1953), the first major diplomatic and military confrontation between America and a powerful communist foe. (Communist China had intervened on behalf of communist North Korea in its war with South Korea, which was aided by the United States.) At home, Eisenhower supported and encouraged efforts to root out potential communist spies in America, but privately expressed disgust at the shameless tactics used by Senator Joseph McCarthy during the HUAC (House Un-American Activities Committee) hearings. In July 1955, Ike’s attention turned toward communist Russia: He led a conference of world leaders in Geneva with the goal of improving relations with the Russians. Following the meetings, Eisenhower returned to the states, encouraged by what he saw as a small crack in the icy reserve of the Russian leadership.

Ike’s busy presidential schedule was interrupted in September 1955 when he suffered a heart attack that restricted his activity for nearly two months. Stoic and resilient, Eisenhower recovered to embark on a second presidential campaign in 1956; he won easily. During his two terms, Eisenhower witnessed the rise of a powerful political and economic alliance between America’s military and its industries might wield too much influence over American domestic and foreign affairs and warned Americans of what he called a “military-industrial complex” in his now famous farewell speech, televised across the nation on January 17, 1961.

After leaving the White House, Eisenhower and his wife Mamie traveled and remained active in public life and in the Republican Party. Their grandson, David, married President Richard Nixon’s daughter Julie in 1968. The next year, Eisenhower died of heart failure in Walter Reed Army Hospital, with Mamie at his side.

READ MORE: Dwight D. Eisenhower: His Life and Legacy


World War II: General Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969) was a decorated war hero, having participated in two World Wars, holding many titles. After retiring from active duty, he entered politics and served as president of the United States from 1953–1961.

Fast Facts: Dwight D. Eisenhower

  • Known For: General of the Army in World War II, U.S. President from 1953–1961
  • Born: October 14, 1890 in Denison, Texas
  • Parents: David Jacob and Ida Stover Eisenhower
  • Died: March 28, 1969 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
  • Education: Abilene High School, West Point Naval Academy (1911–1915), Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas (1925–1926)
  • Spouse: Marie "Mamie" Geneva Doud (m. July 1, 1916)
  • Children: Doud Dwight (1917–1921) and John Sheldon Doud Eisenhower (1922–2013)

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight David Eisenhower was born in Texas in 1890 to David Jacob and Ida Elizabeth (Stover) Eisenhower. The third of seven boys, he was raised in the family home in Abilene. Called &ldquoIke&rdquo as a young man, he played football and other sports and graduated from Abilene High School in 1909. Eisenhower applied to West Point and Annapolis military academies in 1910. He requested and received an appointment from Kansas Senator Joseph L. Bristow, and was admitted to West Point in 1911.

Eisenhower graduated from West Point in 1915 and received his commission as a second lieutenant. He married Mamie Geneva Doud on July 1, 1916, while he was stationed in Texas. They had two children. He served in the Panama Canal and Philippines in the 1920s and 1930s and graduated first in his class from the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth in 1926. He was promoted to brigadier general in 1941. Eisenhower directed the allied invasions of North Africa, Sicily, and Italy from 1942 to 1943. In December 1943 President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed him Supreme Commander, Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force. In this capacity Eisenhower was in charge of the planning and execution of the Normandy Invasion, June 6, 1944, which ultimately led to victory in Europe the following May.

Following the war, Eisenhower served as president of Columbia University (1948-1949) and NATO commander (1950-1952) and before accepting the 1952 Republican Party presidential nomination. Running on a campaign of &ldquoI Like Ike,&rdquo he was twice elected president. Serving from 1953 to 1961, Eisenhower presided during a post-war period of great prosperity for the nation. The Cold War Era caused growing concerns for the country, and the activities of the Civil Rights Era were just beginning. Eisenhower authorized the Interstate Highway System in 1956, People to People International in 1956, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in 1958. He was the first president to appear on color television and the last president born in the 19th century. Eisenhower was the only general to serve as president during the 20th century.

Eisenhower spent his remaining years at his Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, farm. On March 28, 1969, Eisenhower died at Washington's Walter Reed General Hospital. His body was returned to Abilene and buried at the Eisenhower Center. Numerous public middle and high schools are named for him. A memorial on the National Mall near the Smithsonian&rsquos National Air and Space Museum is in the planning stages.

View primary sources related to Dwight D. Eisenhower in Kansas Memory.

Entry: Eisenhower, Dwight D.

Author: Kansas Historical Society

Author information: The Kansas Historical Society is a state agency charged with actively safeguarding and sharing the state's history.

Date Created: April 2010

Date Modified: June 2016

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From Columbia University to the presidency

Eisenhower denied any desire to enter politics and in 1948 left the military to become president of Columbia University. In 1950 he accepted an offer made by President Harry Truman (1884�) to become the first commander of the newly formed North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO an organization formed by many European countries and the United States, who all signed a treaty in 1949 agreeing to defend Western Europe against a possible attack by the Soviet Union). As the commander of NATO, Eisenhower's ability to deal with men of strong and differing opinions was valuable.

Although Eisenhower had not previously claimed any interest in politics, he remained popular with the American public. He became the Republican candidate in the 1952 presidential election and won by a tremendous margin. Throughout 1955 and 1956 he suffered health problems but was able to accept his party's renomination and easily won the 1956 election.

Eisenhower's strength as president was largely based upon his strong character. For most of his presidency, he was compelled to rely upon both Democrats and Republicans. As a leader, Eisenhower shared power with others and often took positions in the center. He was influenced by his secretary of the treasury, George Humphrey (1890�), and by his secretary of state, John Foster Dulles (1888�).

To classify Eisenhower as liberal (in favor of individual rights) or conservative (in favor of preserving tradition and gradual change) is difficult. He was sympathetic to business and was not in favor of enlarging the role of government in economic affairs. Yet he favored some liberal ideas, such as social security, minimum wage, and the establishment of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.


Later Life

Following his presidency, Eisenhower retired to a farmhouse in Gettysburg with his wife, Mamie. Although he had resigned his commission as a general when he became president, when he left office his successor, President Kennedy, reactivated his commission. He also kept an office at Gettysburg College for the remainder of his life, where he held meetings and wrote his memoirs.

Eisenhower died on March 28, 1969, at Walter Reed Army Hospital in Washington, D.C., following a long period of suffering from a heart-related illness. In addition to a state funeral in the nation&aposs capital, a military funeral was held in Eisenhower&aposs beloved hometown of Abilene, Kansas.


Marriage

Eisenhower's ranking at West Point did not merit any choice assignments in the regular army. After graduating, he was assigned to the infantry as a second lieutenant and sent to Fort Sam Houston in Texas. He met Mamie Doud at a party in San Antonio and soon fell in love. They were wed on July 1, 1916, and remained married until Eisenhower's death. They had two sons, David Dwight and John Sheldon. David died early, at the age of four, while John followed in his father's footsteps, advancing to West Point and a military career.


Eisenhower Birthplace History

Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower was born in the bedroom of the two-story house in Denison on Oct. 14, 1890. He was the only one of David and Ida Eisenhower’s seven children born in Texas. David brought his wife and their two young sons Arthur and Edgar from Hope, Kansas in 1889 to pursue a new life in Texas working on the railroad. The Eisenhowers rented a simple frame house near the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad yards where David worked as a wiper, earning less than $40 a month cleaning the steam engines.

When Eisenhower was nearly 18 months old, his family returned to Kansas where his father secured employment with Belle Springs Creamery as a refrigeration engineer. It would be another 23 years before Eisenhower returned to Texas, this time as a second lieutenant in the Army infantry, stationed at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio. While in San Antonio, he met Mamie Doud, a young socialite from Denver, Colorado. After a brief courtship, they were married on July 1, 1916.

Eisenhower was always the pride of Denison. The community acquired the Birthplace home in 1946 and he was hailed as a hometown hero when he came back to visit that year. He returned again on a presidential campaign trip in 1952, and Eisenhower Birthplace became a state park while he was president in 1958. He made his final visit in 1965 to dedicate the Eisenhower Auditorium at Denison High School (now Scott Middle School). In 2003, the Birthplace home was refurbished with 1890s-era furnishings.


Dwight D. Eisenhower is born

Future president Dwight D. Eisenhower is born near Abilene, Texas on October 14, 1890.After graduating from West Point in 1915, Eisenhower embarked on a stellar military career–he would eventually become the supreme commander of Allied forces in Europe during World War II and the leader of the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Following the war, “Ike,” as he was affectionately called, served as president of Columbia University until 1951, when he became supreme commander of NATO forces in Europe. The next year, Eisenhower beat out Democrat Adlai Stevenson to become president of the United States.

The Cold War and a determination to prevent the spread of communism permeated Eisenhower’s foreign and domestic policies. During his first term, Eisenhower oversaw the end of the Korean War (1950 – 1953), the first major diplomatic and military confrontation between America and a powerful communist foe. (Communist China had intervened on behalf of communist North Korea in its war with South Korea, which was aided by the United States.) At home, Eisenhower supported and encouraged efforts to root out potential communist spies in America, but privately expressed disgust at the shameless tactics used by Senator Joseph McCarthy during the HUAC (House Un-American Activities Committee) hearings. In July 1955, Ike’s attention turned toward communist Russia: He led a conference of world leaders in Geneva with the goal of improving relations with the Russians. Following the meetings, Eisenhower returned to the states, encouraged by what he saw as a small crack in the icy reserve of the Russian leadership.

Ike’s busy presidential schedule was interrupted in September 1955 when he suffered a heart attack that restricted his activity for nearly two months. Stoic and resilient, Eisenhower recovered to embark on a second presidential campaign in 1956 he won easily. During his two terms, Eisenhower witnessed the rise of a powerful political and economic alliance between America’s military and its industries might wield too much influence over American domestic and foreign affairs and warned Americans of what he called a “military-industrial complex” in his now famous farewell speech, televised across the nation on January 17, 1961.

After leaving the White House, Eisenhower and his wife Mamie traveled and remained active in public life and in the Republican Party. Their grandson, David, married President Richard Nixon’s daughter Julie in 1968. The next year, Eisenhower died of heart failure in Walter Reed Army Hospital, with Mamie at his side.


Dwight D. Eisenhower is born - HISTORY



Dwight D. Eisenhower was born October 14, 1890 in Denison, Texas.

His great-grandparents had emigrated to the United States in 1741 sailing from the Netherlands to Delaware. As farmers, they settled in Pennsylvania. Dwight's grandfather was a Mennonite * preacher of a community known as the River Brethren. The Eisenhowers opposed slavery, but did not fight in the Civil War because they were pacifists who didn't believe in fighting. Some of them, however, did go against the church's teaching and fought in the Union Army.

Eisenhower's parents, David and Ida married in 1885 and David's parents gave them $2000 and 160 acres of land. Unlike the rest of his family, David refused to speak German to his wife and children. He thought they would have more opportunities if English was their primary language. They opened a store, which failed, then moved to Texas first to Tyler, then Denison where Dwight their third son was born two years later, followed by four more sons.

Later Eisenhowere would say the family was poor, but they never knew it. Dwight helped out by going door to door selling vegatables from their garden. Each son had a small plot in the family garden to raise produce to sell.

In school Ike loved history and neglected his other studies and chores to study Greek and Roman History. His mother didn't like for him to read books about war and the military, and once she took the books and locked them in a closet.

When he was a freshman in high school he fell and scraped his knee. When it became infected, the doctor said his leg would have to be amputated. Ike could not bear to think of losing his leg. He begged his brother Edgar to stop them if they tried to remove it. His parents finally agreed that the leg should have a chance to heal on its own. It did heal and Ike's leg was saved.

Ike and his brother Ed planned to put each other through college by each working to pay for the other's expenses. Ike worked to support his brother for two years in a creamery * where Mr. Eisenhower worked. At the creamery he pulled 300 pound blocks of ice which were used to cool the milk and butter.

After that he decided to further his own education. He applied at the Naval Academy, but at age 20 was too old to be accepted. However, he had an opportunity to enroll in the military academy at West Point. Many military leaders had been trained at West Point. George Washington had used it as his headquarters, and Thomas Jefferson had started the military academy there in 1802.

Though his education was free, he had just enough money for the deposit and transportation to the school. He arrived with $5 in his pocket. He was not a model student and frequently got into trouble because he wouldn't follow all the rules and regimentation. *

After his graduation from the military academy he was assigned as a second lieutenant at Fort Sam Houston. He wanted to serve in combat in France, but they assigned him to be a teacher training the troops and also he was the football coach.

When he met Mamie Doud, they were instantly attracted to each other. They became engaged and decided to marry soon because due to trouble in Mexico, Ike was going to be reassigned. Right before the wedding he was promoted to first lieutenant and began earning $20 more a month which was a welcome addition to the $141.67 a month which he received.

After they were married they traveled to visit Ike's parents and Mamie was surprised at how differently their families lived. She had been raised in an aristocratic * family and Ike's family had been poor.

Their first son, Doud Dwight died at age three of scarlet fever. The following year their son John was born.

The United States had been drawn into World War 1 by the sinking of the liner the Lusitania on May 7, 1915 by a German submarine. There were 128 Americans among the 2000 civilians who died when the ship sank.

The newest weapon the army had at that time was the armored tank and Eisenhower was assigned to train soldiers in tank warfare. Earlier in their quest to learn everything about the tank, he and George Patton disassembled a tank, put it back together, and drove it.

Several years later Eisenhower served under General Fox Conner in Panama and then Douglas MacArthur in the Philippines. During this time Germany, Italy, and Japan formed a group which was known as the Axis. They began invading other countries. The dictator Adolph Hitler was the German leader. Eisenhower was certain the Americans would be drawn into the conflict. The isolationists * said America should not enter the war unless the country was attacked. That attack came on December 7, 1941 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. More than 2300 people died and another 2000 were wounded.

When World War 2 started he was promoted to brigadier general and returned to the United States. His next promotions were to major general, then Commander in Chief of the Allied Forces in North Africa.

During World War 2 the landing on the coast of Normandy was crucial to the Allies winning the war. The maneuver was called by the code-name Operation Overlord . It involved tens of thousands of U.S., British, and Canadian soldiers. The landing was called D-Day. Eisenhower had been responsible for planning the invasion of Europe.

When he met with the troops he told them, "Don't worry, you have the best equipment and the best leaders." A sergeant replied, "We ain't worried, General."

Thousands of soldiers died in the battle, but the campaign was noted as successful.

In December 1944 a battle took place in Belgium. It was called the Battle of the Bulge because the Germans pushing back the allied troops caused a bulge in the Allied line on war maps.

Fierce fighting continued for months, but the war with Germany was over on May 7, 1945 when Germany surrendered. People over the world celebrated the Victory in Europe (V-E Day).

He returned as a hero to the United States. Eisenhower was overwhelmed with the receptions he received in England and in America. He said, "I'm just a Kansas farmer boy who did his duty."

Harry Truman was now President of the United States. It was his decision to use the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end the war with Japan. Over 100,000 people were killed, and the Japanese surrendered. World War 2 had ended.

After the war was over, it was Eisenhower's job to demobilize * the army. 7 million men and women were discharged from the service and allowed to go home.

Five years later President Truman appointed him to be the supreme allied commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

After retiring from the Army as a Five-star General he became president of Columbia University, but people wanted him to run for President of the United States. He didn't want to, but after seeing the response of the people he decided to seek the Republican nomination.

The Republican slogan was We Like Ike . He won the nomination over Robert A. Taft, then chose Richard Nixon to be his running mate. I Like Ike campaign buttons were distributed.

When he was campaigning, ads were created that showed him talking to ordinary Americans. These ads were run on television before and after the very popular I Love Lucy show. In 1952 one newspaper poll found Eisenhower to be the most admired living American. People thought of him as "the man who won the war".

Eisenhower won by a landslide * over the Democratic nominee, Adlai Stevenson. When the election was over he had 34 million votes and Stevenson had 27 million. By electoral votes he had 442 and Stevenson had 89.

In 1956 he again faced Stevenson and Eisenhower won that election by 9 1/2 million votes. He had 457 electoral votes and Stevenson had 73. His popularity had only increased during the four years he was in office.

After World War 2 ended, the United States became embroiled * in the war in Korea. An "arms race" of development of nuclear weapons was entered into by the United States and Russia and China (who were Communist countries). Eisenhower worked to stop the spread of Communism.

At the same time in America, Joseph McCarthy was falsely accusing many Americans of being Communists. Eisenhower quietly worked to stop McCarthy's "witch-hunt" * in 1954.

In May of 1954 the U.S. Supreme Court in a case called Brown vs the Board of Education of Topeka ordered schools to desegregate and allow black and white children to attend school together. Racial segregation was ruled unconstitutional.

Historians fault Eisenhower for not taking a strong stand to guarantee civil rights. He disagreed with the judicial order to desegregate the schools because he thought the problem would be resolved in time without government interference, but he finally implemented the order by sending federal troops into Little Rock so that African American children could attend classes there.

During his presidency one of his major improvements for the country was the development of an interstate highway system. As a young lieutenant colonel he had seen firsthand how hard it was to move Amry convoys across the country on the narrow highways. He proposed, and Congress passed the Federal Aid Highway Act and funded it with an initial $175 million for an interstate highway system.

The estimated cost for completing it would be $27 billion. It was such an enormous amount they finally passed legislation for a federal gasoline tax to pay for the system. The final cost was $129 billion and the elaborate system was made up of 47,000 miles of highways joining major cities all over the nation. A person could travel from coast to coast without ever seeing a stop light.

In September 1955 Eisenhower had a heart attack. Thousands of get-well cards began arriving at the hospital. While he was recovering, Mamie answered all the cards and letters personally.

Dwight D. Eisenhower died on March 28, 1969 when his heart failed. He was buried in Abilene, Kansas, the town where he had grown up.

Though he was a military man, he always felt the conflict between war and his early religious training. He warned against having a military that had too much clout and influence. * He foresaw a time when the military-industrial complex would have undue and misplaced power. He once said,

Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the cloud of threatening war, it is humanity hanging from a cross of iron.

Dwight D. Eisenhower April 16, 1953

This biography by Patsy Stevens, a retired teacher, was written September 13,2012.


Eisenhower Birthplace History

Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower was born in the bedroom of the two-story house in Denison on Oct. 14, 1890. He was the only one of David and Ida Eisenhower’s seven children born in Texas. David brought his wife and their two young sons Arthur and Edgar from Hope, Kansas in 1889 to pursue a new life in Texas working on the railroad. The Eisenhowers rented a simple frame house near the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad yards where David worked as a wiper, earning less than $40 a month cleaning the steam engines.

When Eisenhower was nearly 18 months old, his family returned to Kansas where his father secured employment with Belle Springs Creamery as a refrigeration engineer. It would be another 23 years before Eisenhower returned to Texas, this time as a second lieutenant in the Army infantry, stationed at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio. While in San Antonio, he met Mamie Doud, a young socialite from Denver, Colorado. After a brief courtship, they were married on July 1, 1916.

Eisenhower was always the pride of Denison. The community acquired the Birthplace home in 1946 and he was hailed as a hometown hero when he came back to visit that year. He returned again on a presidential campaign trip in 1952, and Eisenhower Birthplace became a state park while he was president in 1958. He made his final visit in 1965 to dedicate the Eisenhower Auditorium at Denison High School (now Scott Middle School). In 2003, the Birthplace home was refurbished with 1890s-era furnishings.


History

1990 – Establishment of the Richard G. Lugar Excellence in Public Service Series

A volunteer board of women in Indiana organized for the purpose of recruiting, training and electing Republican women. As a result of the success of the Lugar Series, women from several other states who shared the vision of recruiting more Republican women to positions in the public arena have worked to implement similar programs.

1993 – Presentation to the Republican National Committee

A presentation about the Lugar Series made to the Republican National Committee (RNC) triggered action in several states and ultimately resulted in a nationwide expansion effort initiated by the RNC. The groups created were organized under the National Excellence in Public Service Series, and is also referred to as The Winning Women Series.

1995 – Illinois Becomes First Expansion State with the Lincoln Series

Quickly to follow in 1998, New Jersey began the Whitman Series in honor of Governor Christy Todd Whitman. Ohio began its JoAnn Davidson Ohio Leadership Institute in 2000.

2001 – The RNC Invests in The Winning Women’s Series

Following the election of George W. Bush as president, the RNC invested $250,000 to make sure every state in the country could have a women’s leadership development program if they wanted one. Pennsylvania kicked off the Anne Anstine Excellence in Public Service Series. New Hampshire has the Vesta Roy Series, Minnesota has the North Star Series, Connecticut has the Nutmeg Series, and California has the Marian Bergeson Series. There are two mini-versions: New York Empire Women and Kentucky Women’s Roundtable. Other organizations are established or underway in Alaska, Florida, Delaware, Nevada, West Virginia, Arizona, Hawaii, South Carolina, Massachusetts and North Dakota.

2006 – The Dwight D. Eisenhower Excellence in Public Service Series Begins

The Dwight D. Eisenhower Excellence in Public Service Series was established through the generosity and encouragement of the late Mr. John Uhlman, a resident of Shawnee Mission, Kansas. Many women were instrumental in founding the Eisenhower Series. The Series continues operate through the generosity of donors, class members and alumni.



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