Emery DE-28 - History

Emery DE-28 - History

Emery

Jack Mandeville Emery, born 9 October 1916 in Los Angeles, Calif., was appointed ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve 20 May 1939, and reported for active duty in Arizona (BB-39) 13 November 1939. He was killed in action when Arizona was lost in the attack on Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941.

DE-28: dp. 1,140- 1. 289'6"- b. 35'1", dr. 8'3"- s. 21 k.;
cpl. 156; a. 3 3", 8 dcp., 1 dcp.(hh.), 2 dct.; cl. Evarts)

Emery (DE-28) was launched 17 April 1943 by Mare Island Navy Yard without a name, as BDE-28; reallocated to the United States; assigned the name Eisner 14 June 1943; renamed Emery 14 July 1943; and commissioned 14 August 1943, Lieutenant Commander R. G. Coburn, USNR, in command.

Emery cleared Pearl Harbor 1 November 1943 for Funafuti and a month of local escort duty in preparation for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands, during which she screened vulnerable tankers fueling assault ships and their covering force of major combatants. She returned to Pearl Harbor 16 December for training, and on 16 January 1944 put to sea to protect tankers again during the assault on the Marshalls, after which she escorted convoys between Majuro and Funafuti until 9 March.

Between March 1944 and September, Emery sailed out of Port Purvis escorting combatants, auxiliaries, and merchantmen to Emirau, Green Island, Bougainville, and other southwest Pacific ports. She arrived at Manus 27 September, and after screening a small convoy to the Russell Islands, proceeded to Peleliu for antisubmarine patrol and an escort voyage to Ulithi. She returned to Ulithi for brief overhaul in November, then swung back through the Marianas and Marshalls on convoy duty, arriving at Eniwetok 4 March. This was her base through July 1945, as she carried out escort missions to Guam, Saipan, Ulithi, Iwo Jima, and Kwajalein Thus she guarded the movement of men and supplies essential to the seaborne advance on Japan. On 5 July she sailed for San Francisco, where she was decommissioned 15 November 1945, and sold 21 July 1947.

Emery received four battle stars for World War II service


USS Emery (DE-28)

USS Emery (DE-28) là một tàu khu trục hộ tống lớp Evarts được Hải quân Hoa Kỳ chế tạo trong Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai. Nó là chiếc tàu chiến duy nhất của Hải quân Mỹ được đặt theo tên Thiếu úy Hải quân Jack Mandeville Emery (1916-1941), phục vụ trên thiết giáp hạm USS Arizona (BB-39) và đã tử trận trong vụ tấn công Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 7 tháng 12, 1941. [1] Nó đã phục vụ cho đến khi chiến tranh kết thúc, xuất biên chế vào ngày 15 tháng 11, 1945 và xóa đăng bạ vào ngày 28 tháng 11, 1945. Con tàu bị bán để tháo dỡ vào ngày 27 tháng 7, 1947. Emery được tặng thưởng ba Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.

  • 1.140 tấn Anh (1.160 t) (tiêu chuẩn)
  • 1.430 tấn Anh (1.450 t) (đầy tải)
  • 283 ft 6 in (86,41 m) (mực nước)
  • 289 ft 5 in (88,21 m) (chung)
  • 4 × động cơ dieselGeneral Motors Kiểu 16-278A với máy phát điện
  • 2 × trục chân vịt
  • 15 sĩ quan
  • 183 thủy thủ
    kiểu SA & SL Kiểu 128D hoặc Kiểu 144
  • Ăn-ten định vị MF
  • Ăn-ten định vị cao tần Kiểu FH 4
  • 3 × pháo 3 in (76 mm)/50 cal đa dụng (3×1)
  • 4 × pháo phòng không1,1 inch/75 caliber (1×4)
  • 9 × pháo phòng không Oerlikon 20 mm (9×1)
  • 8 × máy phóng mìn sâu K3
  • 1 × súng cốichống tàu ngầmHedgehog (24 nòng, 144 quả đạn)
  • 2 × đường ray thả mìn sâu

Contents

World War II

Emery cleared Pearl Harbor on 1 November 1943 for Funafuti and a month of local escort duty in preparation for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands, during which she screened vulnerable tankers fueling assault ships and their covering force of major combatants. She returned to Pearl Harbor on 16 December for training, and on 16 January 1944 put to sea to protect tankers again during the assault on the [[Marshall Islands, after which she escorted convoys between Majuro and Funafuti until 9 March.

From March-September, Emery sailed out of Port Purvis escorting combatants, auxiliaries, and merchantmen to Emirau, Green Island, Bougainville Island, and other southwest Pacific ports. She arrived at Manus Island on 27 September, and after screening a small convoy to the Russell Islands, proceeded to Peleliu for antisubmarine patrol and an escort voyage to Ulithi. She returned to Ulithi for brief overhaul in November, then swung back through the Marshall and Mariana Islands on convoy duty, arriving at Eniwetok on 4 March. This was her base through July 1945 as she carried out escort missions to Guam, Saipan, Ulithi, Iwo Jima, and Kwajalein. Thus, she guarded the movement of men and supplies essential to the seaborne advance on Japan.

On 5 July, she sailed for San Francisco, California, where she was decommissioned on 15 November 1945, and sold from scrap on 21 July 1947.


Utah's Online Public Library

Founded in 1880, Emery County is located in the east-central region of the state. It encompasses an area of 4,439 square miles with a population of approximately 10,012 (U.S. Census Bureau, Population Estimates Program, V2019). Castle Dale is the county seat.

  • Origin of Name: Territorial Governor George W. Emery (governor of the Utah Territory from 1875-1880)
  • Bordering Counties: , Grand, San Juan, Sanpete, Sevier, Uintah, and Wayne

A Brief History of Emery County*

Emery County in southeastern Utah is bordered on the north by Carbon County (which was created from Emery in 1894), on the west by the Wasatch Plateau and the original settlements in Sanpete and Sevier counties from which most Emery County settlers came, on the south by the remote artificial boundary with Wayne County, and on the east by the Green River--the natural boundary with Grand County (which was created from Emery County in 1890). Emery County includes three geographical areas: the mountains of the Wasatch Plateau Castle Valley, where the major settlements are located and the desert of the San Rafael Swell, the San Rafael Reef, Cedar Mountain, and the remote stretches of land west of the Green River. The San Rafael River, the lifeblood of the county, originates in the Wasatch Plateau where the headwaters are stored in several reservoirs for agricultural and industrial use. It flows into Castle Valley in three branches -- Huntington Creek, Cottonwood Creek, and Ferron Creek -- which unite to form the San Rafael River after they pass the communities and adjacent farm land. It then twists its way through the rock and desert to its junction with the Green River.

Occupation of the San Rafael region dates back thousands of years to include people of the Archaic Period who were followed by those of the Fremont Culture who inhabited present-day Emery County from about A.D. 500 to 1300 Evidence of these people can still be found in numerous pictograph and petroglyph panels, such as those in Temple Mountain Wash, Muddy Creek, Ferron Box, Black Dragon Canyon, and Buckhorn Wash, all sites listed in the National Register of Historic Places. In historic times Ute Indians occupied sites in Castle Valley, and travelers along the Old Spanish Trail also passed through the present county.

In 1875 livestock growers from Sanpete County, recognizing the settlement potential of the region, brought cattle and sheep into Castle Valley to graze. With a shortage of sufficient land and water in Sanpete County and a strong desire by Mormon church leaders to acquire unoccupied land in the region before non-Mormons did, young families began moving into Castle Valley in the fall of 1877 to take up homesteads in what would become the settlements of Huntington, Ferron, Castle Dale, and Orangeville.

Although livestock and farming remained the mainstay of the county's economy throughout most of its history, two related events affected the region's economic stability: the completion of the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad through Emery in 1883 and the development of the coal mines at Scofield, Castle Gate, and Sunnyside in Carbon County by 1895. The railroad provided the transportation for produce and livestock, while the mines provided a nearby market for animals and vegetables and an opportunity for some Emery residents to work in the mines during winter and farm during summer. The D&RGW also led to the establishment of the town of Green River, although the site had been an important part of the Old Spanish Trail and a mail station had been established there before completion of the railroad. During the 1970s Emery County's population grew significantly because of the construction by Utah Power and Light Company of large power plants in Castle Dale and Huntington and the opening of large coal mines to fuel the power plants.

*Used by permission. Beehive History 14: Utah Counties. 1988. Utah State Historical Society, 300 Rio Grande, Salt Lake City, UT 84101-1182.


175-year-old Emery chemical company turned lard into largess

Article from Cincinnati.com dated October 8, 2015 written by Jeff Suess

To think it started with pig fat.

Back in 1840, Thomas Emery found that the lard discarded from Cincinnati’s prodigious meat industry could be converted into candles and lamp oil in the days before electric lights.

The Emery family then turned a slaughterhouse byproduct into a global chemical manufacturing company and built up a fortune that has been a boon to the city for generations.

Emery Oleochemicals, which derived from Thomas Emery’s lard oil factory, is celebrating its 175th anniversary this year.

Now based in Malaysia, Emery processes oleic acid and glycerine from animal fats and vegetable oils that are then used in many everyday products, from toothpaste and lotions to lubricants and adhesives, according to “Evolution of a Legacy,” a book tracing the company’s history.

In September, Emery unveiled a $50 million plant expansion at their site straddling St. Bernard and Winton Hills near Ivorydale, where the company has had a plant since 1885.

Thomas Emery, an immigrant from Bedford, England, brought his family to the Ohio River Valley in 1832, just ahead of the influx of German immigrants in the next decades that would swell Cincinnati to be the largest city in the west.

His first venture was raising silkworms in Kentucky, but the mulberry trees wouldn’t grow and the silkworms died, according to his grandson, John J. Emery Jr., in a 1971 Enquirer Magazine profile.

The Emery patriarch then moved across the river and tried his hand as a real estate agent, reportedly buying up more land than he sold, before finally settling on a winning business prospect.

Cincinnati in those days was the meat packing capital. The streets were flush with pigs headed for the slaughterhouses, earning the city the unglamorous nickname Porkopolis.

Just as William Procter and James Gamble had done in 1837 making soap, Emery built a successful business repurposing the animal fat to make dripless candles, lamp oil and lubricant for wool yarn.

Thomas Emery’s Lard Oil company (later known as the Emery Candle Company) started in 1840 on Sycamore Street between Eighth and Ninth streets, then moved to Water Street along the riverfront in 1848, when the factory was captured in the well-known “Cincinnati Panorama of 1848” daguerreotype by Charles Fontayne and William S. Porter.

Emery brought his sons Thomas J. Emery and John Josiah Emery into the family business, and they took over after tragedy struck on Dec. 30, 1857. Thomas Emery fell to his death through an open hatchway in their new manufacturing facility on the southeast corner of Vine and Water streets.

The Cincinnati Daily Gazette eulogized: “Mr. Emery was a quiet and unassuming man, strictly conscientious in all dealings, and was much respected by his fellow citizens. … He seemed to regard it a privilege to contribute towards relieving the wants of his fellow creatures, or to promote the general interests of the community.”

The riverfront was prone to flooding, so in 1885 the Emery sons relocated the factory to an 8.9-acre tract near St. Bernard, the same site where the plant is today.

In the 1890s, Ernst Twitchell, the company’s first chemist, discovered and developed the Twitchell Process of fat splitting using a catalyst to separate fatty acids from fats and oils. For his work in the field, the University of Cincinnati graduate was awarded the prestigious Perkin Medal.

Thomas and John, meanwhile, focused on their real estate dealings under the name Thomas Emery’s Sons. In the 1870s, they bought up several plots along Fifth Street near the new Fountain Square and built the Emery Hotel and arcade at Fifth and Race.

Even more, the Emery sons continued their father’s principles, including giving to charity, notably financing buildings for the Children’s Hospital in Mount Auburn and the Orphan Asylum for Colored Children in Avondale.

Wendell P. Dabney, editor of the African-American newspaper the Union, wrote of the Emerys in his 1926 book, “Cincinnati’s Colored Citizens”:

“In letters of gold the name Emery should be emblazoned upon the hearts of all Cincinnatians. The founder of that name came, and his life was an exemplification of the golden rule … [The Emerys] were of that English stock whose blood ever fired at oppression, whose heart ever warmed to charity. Their recognition of the brotherhood of man caused them to refuse donations to any cause that recognized the color line, and so their princely gifts to institutions carried with them the admission of colored people.”

Thomas J. Emery passed away in 1906 in Cairo, Egypt, while on a business trip, and his $20 million fortune went to his wife, Mary Emery.

A shy, reserved woman whom Stephen Birmingham, in his book, “The Grandes Dames,” called “the loneliest millionairess,” Mary Emery spent decades mourning the deaths of her husband and two sons and donating her fortune to the worthiest causes.

She gave generously to hospitals, colleges, the YMCA, and the Cincinnati Zoo, and funded the Christ Church parish house, the Emery Auditorium, and the Mariemont planned community. Upon her death in 1927, she willed to the Cincinnati Art Museum her $3.5 million art collection, which is now housed in its Emery Wing.

John J. Emery had moved to New York and died in 1908, when his son, John J. Emery Jr., known as Jack, was 10.

Jack Emery attended Harvard Law School and Oxford University in England and served in the Naval Aviation Corps during World War I. In 1924, he intended to go into publishing in New York, but visited Cincinnati to check on the family business.

“I found that the Emery Candle Company was just a grease factory with obsolete equipment and a sort of Dickensian office,” Jack Emery was quoted in “Town & Country” magazine. “I decided the family was going to go bust if someone didn’t hang around and fix things up.”

He married Irene Langhorne Gibson, the daughter of artist Charles Dana Gibson, creator of the “Gibson Girl,” and they lived at Peterloon, an estate in Indian Hill.

Jack Emery propelled Emery Industries into an international corporation, and headed the family company until 1968.

As a developer, he built the Carew Tower complex, the Netherland Plaza Hotel, and the innovative Terrace Plaza Hotel.

Emery was a founder of Cincinnati Country Day School and the political Charter Party, and was a leading benefactor of the Cincinnati Art Museum for 50 years. He died in 1976.

Jack Emery was the last of the family to run the business. The candle business was sold off in 1952 and is now Candle-lite, with offices in Blue Ash and a manufacturing plant in Leesburg, Ohio. After several mergers under the names Henkel and Cognis, the chemical company re-embraced the Emery name in 2009 as Emery Oleochemicals.

Along with the name comes the legacy.

In “Evolution of a Legacy,” the company declared, “The Emery family showed us that true wealth lies in kindness, compassion and generosity.”


Our History

Hey, we're not some big-box seller of toy bikes and treadmills. We're specialist's in the world of bike, triathlon & fitness equipment. Trouble is, some people don't know the difference. Well, co-owner Brent Emery puts it like this. "The world dosen't need to keep filling landfills at a record rate with $10 jeans, $10 shoes, $99 bikes, and $400 treadmills." We offer reasonably priced products that give real value and lifespan. And we guarantee our prices along with terrific service! Maybe that's why we've been voted Milwaukee's Best Bike Shop a number of times in the past few years.

We're not the only shop for you to get the products we sell, but when you look at what is best for you, you're very likely to want to shop at your store. You read right, YOUR store! You are the reason we are here. Now, on to our history, the Emery family, Brent's Olympic story, our development into one of the premier bike fitting studios, and then a chance to meet the staff.

The Emery family opens our 1st store in 1963.

Marilyn & Richard Emery founded Emerys in 1963 on 23rd and Fond Du Lac Avenue in Milwaukee. A true family business, our home was 2 doors away from the store. An attention to quality work, quality products and personal customer service was and is the foundation of our business.Marilyn ran the books, and Richard was the head of the shop.

Over the years, all seven of the Emery children (Christine, Karen, MaryKay, Craig, Brent, Elizabeth and Ben) have worked in the business, some part time, some full time. Sons, Brent and Ben Emery have chosen to make it their careers and now own the company. Here is a timeline of our business. If you have any anecdotes from the past 4+ decades we've been serving you, please forward them to us.

1963: Richard had worked for 16 years for Allen Bradley prior to seeing his true calling to own his own business. While at Allen Bradley as a machinist and welder, he was on the crew that made the hands for the iconic Allen Bradley clock, the worlds largest four faced clock. He was active in his community and church, working for racial equality, was active in politics and assisted locally with John Kennedys presidential campaign, as well as running for a state senate seat. Marilyn worked for and supported all his efforts.

After the Emerys had bought an existing bike shop around the corner from their home, increasing the business was Richard and Marilyns first priority. They were creative at thinking outside the lines. In addition to the day-to-day in-store business, Richard secured a contract with the local Sears store to to warranty work for their bike division. He secured contracts from a few local furniture stores doing welding for metal chairs and tables. Once, he even bought SEVEN semi loads full of toys and odds and ends from JC Pennys and filled all four floors of their business with tables to spread the goods out for sale. That was like an ant farm there were so many customers. As far as bicycles went, the big sellers of the day were 3 speed bikes, cruiser bikes and kids bikes.

1966: To draw more total people through the doors, Richard rented out some showroom space to Len Snell, who sold TV's. We also sold and sharpened Ice Skates during the winters. seems like the winters were snowier and longer back then to be able to skate more often. Brands of bikes we sold back then were Vista, Columbia, Roger Riviere, Ranger Ultra, and Jeunet among others. Jeunet was a very light French bike, one of the first truely light bikes in the US. We were their first dealer in this part of the US. Richard saw and corrected an alignment problem they had. He got ahold of the factory to let them know how to fix it. The president of Jeunet personally thanked Richard on his next trip to the US! Road bikes were starting to sell.

1967: This was a time of trouble in Milwaukee that affected the entire city, as well as other US cities. The Riots of 1967. Our business was on a corner that overlooked an intersection. The lower front face of the building had a flat roof with a ledge on it. From that point, the local police took up a command post, along with Richard and a few others businessmen from that corner. Because they held firm, that intersection was not looted or burned. That year we became a Raleigh bicycle dealer.

1968: Emerys opened a second location on 64th & Lisbon Avenue. It was a smaller store with living quarters behind it. It is amazing how small it really was, but with lots of product and great service, it was successful. Christmas sales of bicycles at that time rivaled sales in spring. Bicycles are one of the great Christmas gifts. Fast forward to 2011 and electronics have displaced a lot of those Christmas kids bikes. Thoughtful parents still buy their children a bike for Christmas. Just ask any child (or adult) who received a bike for Christmas, and they can still tell you the story about it. See if they can remember which electronic widget that they can name from one or two Christmas's ago??

1973: Seeing the opportunity to grow again, Richard and Marilyn bought an empty gas station corner at 100th Street & Lisbon Avenue for a new store. Richard was innovative in keeping the original structure and adding on to it to make a larger store than their other two locations. At the time there were abandoned gas stations all over the city. The end result was a great use for the property. The Emerys won an award from the city for their forward thinking. In retrospect, how ironic that today the world is looking to bikes to solve part of the energy crisis, and Emerys solved part of their bicycle problem with an old gas station. The gas crisis that year had people buying bicycles at a record pace. Road bikes were selling at a rapid rate, despite what we see now as terrible seats! Thank goodness todays seats are quite comfortable, and in shapes for everyone.

1975: Thought we had been doing basic bike fitting since we opened in 1963, Emerys made decision to start fitting all customers more technically. One reason for this switch was their son, Brent, started racing bicycles a couple years earlier. If a correct fit was important for him, then all riders should benefit from a great bike fit. Brent was intrigued bt the technical nature of the fitting end of the business. he began designing custom geometry for custom frames as needed for our elite customers. For all stock bikes, we began changing out bars/stems/seats as needed to complete a perfect fit for all customers. Customers quickly gave feedback that the extra time or cost to make these changes were well worth the effort.

1976: By this time, Emerys had condensed the other stores into their 100th & Lisbon Avenue location to focus all their energy into the best service they could.

1977: Emerys began advertising their son Brents' fitting services in local racing publications.

1978: After a peak in the bicycle business from a few year earlier subsided, and combined with the high inflation and interest rates of 1978, the economy was as rough on the bicycle business as any that year. It was very close to the point that the Emerys considered selling their home to save the business.

1979: A rough winter came and went, the economy improved some, the sun came out, and people started buying bicycles again. That previous year had shown the tenacity and dedication of the Emerys to their business. In late 1979, their son, Brent, accepted a spot at the Olympic Training Center in colorado Springs with the intent on making the 1980 Olympic cycling Team in the Kilo event. Read more on Brents racing carreer after our store history.

1980's: Mountain Bicycles are coming into their own. Emerys became one fo the first stores to carry dual suspension bikes in the midwest. Girvin dual suspension bikes were the best sellers. Girvin became Proflex, which eventually became K2.

1981: Brent designed one of the worlds first aero bikes with a sloping forward frameset, "bullhorn" handlebars, and smaller front wheels. Brent enlisted the help of custom framemaker John Stinsmen of Veloce Cycles in Allentown, Pennsylvania to build that first bike. Using blueprints Brent created, they got so excited about this project that they worked into the night with food and coffee being shuttled in to keep them going. The NEXT night, Brent raced that bike at the track in Trexlertown, PA. The first handlebar was not glorious. It was a 3 speed handlebar turned upside down and backwards, with a few loving bends to shape it. That bike was the impetus for the USA Cycling team to further develop into what were later dubbed the "Funny Bikes" used in the 1984 Olympics to set world and Olympic records.This bike was on display years later in the Milwaukee Public Museum's Wizard Wing.

1982: Richard brings on the Trek Bicycles line. We have built our Trek business to be consistently in their top 100 dealers in the USA for the past 20+ years.

1984: Brents achieves Olympic success with a Silver medal in Los Angeles. Read Brents story below.

1985: Brent comes back into the family business fulltime after a successful racing career racing in nearly 20 countries. Emerys was at the forefront of triathlon bikes locally, even though triathlon was so new that most dealers would not have tri bikes at all. After all, we understood them. Most brands were fashioned with features that Brent had a hand in making possible.

1987: Another major moment for Emerys. Upon hearing about a new innovation form the Scott company (Scott DH aero bars that were not yet on the market), Brent developed his own version of aero clip-on handlebars, one of the world first!. Initially he was interested in using them on his own bike for the single day 224 mile time trial from LaCrosse, Wi to Milwaukee, WI. They worked so well, he demonstrated them a few weeks later to the US Team during their warm-up at the Indy 500 track a few days before the Pan American Games TTT. That same year, Brent outfitted a few competitors with them for use in the Ironman World Championships in Hawaii. Naturally, bike fit positioning had to be different when outfitting our clients with aero bars for triathlon. We were one of the worlds first to create aero bars and we've been developing our skills for new school triathlon positioning ever since.

1989: Emerys expands again, this time opening a store on west Main Street in Menomonee Falls, with Ben Emery running that location initially with his father, then managing it overall. The fitness equipment sales and service side of our business was growing in large part, to Ben's efforts at that location.

1990's: Emerys expands our triathlon, road selection at our Milwaukee store. We expand our fitness equipment business with more products and knowledge. Never letting our recreational customers take a back seat, we've created a very interesting mix of product that caters to all cycling, triathlon and fitness groups. We incorporate Performance Bicycle Shop in Wisconsin. First, this a great name for our pro bike division, and second, we own that name in Wisconsin, so if any store from another state wants to operate under that name in Wisconsin, they have to talk to me first about how much it I'd sell that for, if I decide to sell it at all.

1993'ish: Marilyn Emery retires after doing the bookkeeping (and keeping the peace in the family business) since 1963. We can't imagine how this business would have survived without her hard work and patience.

1994: We move our Menomonee Falls store to a larger location on Appleton Avenue.

1995: Richard Emery retires, selling the business to his two sons. Much to the amazement of his family, retirement agrees with him. We all thought he'd be a bit uncertain about retirement as he had shown so much passion and dedication to the business. Good for him! He had been working since he was 9 years old. A couple successful labor intensive careers, a political carreer, comunity involvement, and a large family. Not bad for a baby of the depression that did not finish high school. He's one of the smartest people we (and a lot of other people) know.

1998: We start our emerys.com site. Oh, how we cringe looking back at our feeble first stab. If you're interested, click here to see it. We begin to offer FREE extended warranties and service with new bicycles, a real competitive advantage. With the world'a'changin', we reinforce our commitment to matching prices to keep our customers satisfied, this now means taking on internet competition. It will take a long time for us to get people to take us seriously on this, but slowly and surely, people are choosing to give us the opportunity to price match and buy from us.

1999: After 10 years of renting, Ben finds a suitable building for us to buy for our Menomonee Falls store. We move from Appleton Avenue to our current location on Main Street 2 blocks west of Hwy 45. We bring on Cervelo bicycles at our Milwaukee location, which will prove to be a great line for Emerys.

2000: The Y2K non scare. At least it made us take our computer system seriously.

2001: 9/11. Changed a lot of things for us and a lot of people. #1 was that it brought more people to pray and to appreciate our great country.

2002: Customers are now traveling from other states to work with Brent for technical fitting for road and triathlon. The 2002 Wisconsin Ironman Pro women's winner, Heather Gollnick, had spent a number of hours getting her position fine-tuned by Brent. Her results speak for highly for her and our services. A particular aspect of triathlon bike fit theory Brent worked on for a number of previous years has changed the triathlon concept of triathlon position to enhance the athlete's ability to run better after the bike leg. Nearly every triathlete Brent has fitted has immediately gone on to set personal records with better bike splits and also a faster run.

2003: Ben brings Landice treadmills to our business, which has become a mainstay of our fitness business.

2003: Paul Swift visited Emerys recently. Paul is the creator of "The Wedge", angled pieces to go between the cleat and the shoe for correcting foot angle. Paul has visited hundreds of shops promoting his product and doing fitting clinics. He was impressed with how we go about the fitting process and mentioned "you are one of the top 5 or 10 shops in North America for fitting". Most of our other factory reps say we are most certainly the best fitting store they are aware of in this part of the US. Our goal is to be #1.

2004: Heather Gollnick gets fitted on her new Q.R. Team bike with custom aero bars that Brent made exclusively for her. Heatherl goes on to blow away the field at Wildflower two weeks later. She credits Brent with being a part of the win! This same year, Heather was the first American finisher in Kona at the ironman world championships.

Over the years, the staff of Emerys two stores has done involved fittings for over 50,000 people. Continually searching for more precise ways to fit customers has led Brent to develop criteria for making those subjective decisions for varying the position for each customer. This is why you should buy you next bike at Emerys, and your friends should buy their next bike at Emerys, and their friends, and so on. Call ahead, talk to our experienced staff. We can get the bike of your dreams built to you!

2005: Brent competes in Ironman Wisconsin.

2006: Emerys runs it's first Ironman party on the big hill Midtown Road during Ironman Wisconsin, a great event is born, growing every year.

2007: Brent races at the World Cycling Championships in Australia finishing 6th in three different events. We sell more "Best Buy" and top recommended bike and fitness brands than any local store.

2008: Our triathlon and fitness businesses have grown in importance that we give each their own 'branding'. Emerys Third Coast Triathlon Shops and Emerys Wisconsin Home Fitness are born. Though this is good marketing, we are still the Emerys, where great service reigns!

2009: Emerys Third Coast Tri Shops is the largest vendor at the USA's largest triathlon Expo, the Great lakes Multisport and Running Expo.

2010: We set our goals to bringing out our new website at year end with full e-commerce capability.

Over the years, the staff of Emerys two stores has done involved fittings for over 55,000 people. Continually searching for more precise ways to fit customers has led Brent to develop criteria for making those subjective decisions for varying the position for each customer. This is why you should buy you next bike at Emerys, and your friends should buy their next bike at Emerys, and their friends, and so on. Call ahead, talk to Brent and we can get the bike of your dreams built to you!


Facebook

Tonight, we look back at the history of the EVARTS class USS EMERY DE-28. She honored Jack Marvin Emery, who was born on 9 October 1916, in Los Angeles, California. He enlisted in the naval reserve on 21 August 1939 for officer training, and was commissioned an ensign on 21 August 1939. Then he reported aboard USS ARIZONA BB-39 on 13 November 1939, and served in the communications department. He was killed in action when ARIZONA was lost in the attack on Pearl Harbor, on 7 December 1941.

His namesake, USS EMERY (DE-28), was launched on 17 April 1943 for the Royal Navy, under Lend Lease by Mare Island Navy Yard, without a name, as BDE-28. When the decision was made that east coast ships should be given to the Brits to save time, BDE-28 was reallocated to the United States, and initially assigned the name EISNER on 14 June 1943, but renamed EMERY on 14 July 1943. She was commissioned on 14 August 1943, with Lcdr Robert Grimes Coburn, USNR, in command.

EMERY cleared Pearl Harbor on 1 November 1943 for Funafuti, and a month of local escort duty in preparation for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. During the invasion, she screened vulnerable tankers that were fueling assault ships, and their covering force of major combatants. She returned to Pearl Harbor on 16 December for training. Then, on 16 January 1944, EMERY put to sea, to protect tankers again during the assault on the Marshalls. Afterwards, she escorted convoys between Majuro and Funafuti until 9 March.

Between March and September 1944, EMERY sailed out of Port Purvis escorting combatants, auxiliaries, and merchantmen to Emirau, Green Island, Bougainville, and other southwest Pacific ports. She arrived at Manus on 27 September, and after screening a small convoy to the Russell Islands, proceeded to Peleliu for antisubmarine patrol and an escort voyage to Ulithi.

She returned in Ulithi for brief overhaul in November, and then swung back through the Marianas and Marshalls on convoy duty, arriving at Eniwetok on 4 March. This was her base through July 1945, as she carried out escort missions to Guam, Saipan, Ulithi, Iwo Jima, and Kwajalein. Thus she guarded the movement of men and supplies essential to the sea borne advance on Japan.

On 5 July she sailed for San Francisco, where she was decommissioned on 15 November 1945. On 28 November, she was stricken from the Navy list. On 21 July 1947, she was sold for scrapping to the National Metal & Steel Corp., Terminal Island, in Los Angeles, California.


Our History

Emery and his son Rob from the 80s

He would bring his son, Rob Weinberger, who was only nine years old, to work with him every Saturday, and any other chance he got. In 1969, he moved to Southfield on Greenfield & 9 Mile, into an office building. He stayed there until 1974, when Emery and his wife Natalie opened Emery’s Creative Jewelers at the Charter House in Southfield. Luckily, he and Rob had a great imagination – an amazing vision for what could be – along with a lot of courage, which would bring us to Hunter’s Square in 1984.

Terri and Rob – brother and sister business partners.

Rob’s sister, Terri Herman, graduated with a Bachelor’s of Arts in Fine Arts from Arizona State University, and came home to work in the store. Rob continued working at the store after he graduated high school – taking design and gemology courses. All too soon, Emery passed away in July of 1993. Natalie retired in 2008, but always continued to be an influential part of the business until her passing in January of 2016. May their memory be for a blessing.

Rob’s daughter, Ali, pictured here with Terri “TT”

The legacy continues with Rob’s daughter, Ali Weinberger, who has worked at the store since about age nine – following in her father’s footsteps. She graduated from Michigan State University with a Bachelor’s of Arts in Psychology in December of 2012, and is employed full time at the store.

Rob and his wife Debe Terri and Howard Herman

Tragically, in 2019 Rob passed away after a heroic 8 month battle with cancer. May his memory be for a blessing. It is clear through the wonderful family and community he created and the kindness he instilled, that his memory will live on. Rob’s wife, Debe Weinberger, who has always been influential in Emery’s success, has taken on a new leadership role since his death. Terri’s husband, Howard Herman, also works at the store. The store is also run with help from many dedicated employees who have become family along the way. Although many things have changed in 30 years, one thing still remains – the integrity and love for people that Emery passed on to his children and grandchildren. Everyone is always welcome.

The below is an excerpt from the Mid-America Jewelry News:

Artisan Jewelry, Unique Gifts

Emery’s Creative is a full-service store with artisan jewelry and unique gifts in all price ranges, a great assortment of watches, custom designs and repair. The store is proud to offer the beautiful work of Michigan artists. “Of course, we do custom work ourselves, so we’re Michigan artists, too!” says Rob.

“When Dad died, we kept the business moving along,” he says. Terri is in charge of buying. Her husband, Howard Herman, and Rob’s wife, Debe, are involved in the business. And following in her father’s footsteps, Rob’s daughter Ali, 27, was initiated into Emery’s Creative at the age of 9. “Ali is involved in purchasing and inventory she’s involved in basically running the business.”

Emery’s Creative isn’t large – the showroom takes up about 420 square feet of the store’s total 1,050 square feet. It lends to a friendly, bustling atmosphere. “People walk in and say, ‘I haven’t seen a store this busy in years!’” Rob laughs.

He and his family actively promote the store with local television news appearances, offering gift ideas for special occasions. They showcase items such as wooden beads and stunning pens handcrafted by Michigan artists, a Father’s Day flask – items designed to draw customers into the store.

Since 1987, Emery’s has been offering ear piercing as well – Rob figures he’s done about 12,000 of them. “I have enough pictures to wallpaper the store several times over,” he laughs. “Babies, adults . . . I pierced a grandfather and son who were 18 and 80 years old.”

Rob trained with GIA but describes himself as mostly self-taught. “My father also learned by watching other people. Then you learn how to do it your way.”

Of the many lessons learned from Emery, Rob holds these close: “Don’t get rich on one customer, and be a good person. When you’re good to the people, they’re good to you. Don’t assume a customer can’t afford something by the way they look.”

“It’s a fun store and a great place to be,” adds Rob, who employs 12 people besides family. “There’s no pressure here. No suits and ties. Everybody likes to come to Emery’s. Our motto is, ‘Curiosity brought you here – satisfaction will bring you back.’”

The store’s website says it all: “Although many things have changed in 30 years, one thing still remains, Emery’s integrity and his love for people that he passed on to his children. Everyone is always welcome.”


Facebook

Tonight, we look back at the history of the EVARTS class USS EMERY DE-28. She honored Jack Marvin Emery, who was born on 9 October 1916, in Los Angeles, California. He enlisted in the naval reserve on 21 August 1939 for officer training, and was commissioned an ensign on 21 August 1939. Then he reported aboard USS ARIZONA BB-39 on 13 November 1939, and served in the communications department. He was killed in action when ARIZONA was lost in the attack on Pearl Harbor, on 7 December 1941.

His namesake, USS EMERY (DE-28), was launched on 17 April 1943 for the Royal Navy, under Lend Lease by Mare Island Navy Yard, without a name, as BDE-28. When the decision was made that east coast ships should be given to the Brits to save time, BDE-28 was reallocated to the United States, and initially assigned the name EISNER on 14 June 1943, but renamed EMERY on 14 July 1943. She was commissioned on 14 August 1943, with Lcdr Robert Grimes Coburn, USNR, in command.

EMERY cleared Pearl Harbor on 1 November 1943 for Funafuti, and a month of local escort duty in preparation for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. During the invasion, she screened vulnerable tankers that were fueling assault ships, and their covering force of major combatants. She returned to Pearl Harbor on 16 December for training. Then, on 16 January 1944, EMERY put to sea, to protect tankers again during the assault on the Marshalls. Afterwards, she escorted convoys between Majuro and Funafuti until 9 March.

Between March and September 1944, EMERY sailed out of Port Purvis escorting combatants, auxiliaries, and merchantmen to Emirau, Green Island, Bougainville, and other southwest Pacific ports. She arrived at Manus on 27 September, and after screening a small convoy to the Russell Islands, proceeded to Peleliu for antisubmarine patrol and an escort voyage to Ulithi.

She returned in Ulithi for brief overhaul in November, and then swung back through the Marianas and Marshalls on convoy duty, arriving at Eniwetok on 4 March. This was her base through July 1945, as she carried out escort missions to Guam, Saipan, Ulithi, Iwo Jima, and Kwajalein. Thus she guarded the movement of men and supplies essential to the sea borne advance on Japan.

On 5 July she sailed for San Francisco, where she was decommissioned on 15 November 1945. On 28 November, she was stricken from the Navy list. On 21 July 1947, she was sold for scrapping to the National Metal & Steel Corp., Terminal Island, in Los Angeles, California.


Emery

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

Emery, granular rock consisting of a mixture of the mineral corundum (aluminum oxide, Al2O3) and iron oxides such as magnetite (Fe3O4) or hematite (Fe2O3). Long used as an abrasive or polishing material, it is a dark-coloured, dense substance, having much the appearance of an iron ore. In addition to corundum and iron oxide, emery sometimes contains diaspore, gibbsite, margarite, chloritoid, and sillimanite.

Emery has been worked from very early times on the Greek island of Náxos it occurs there as loose blocks and as lenticular, or lens-shaped, masses or irregular beds in granular limestone associated with crystalline schists. Important deposits, similar to that on Náxos, occur in Turkey, where emery is found as detached blocks in a reddish soil and as rounded masses embedded in a crystalline limestone associated with mica schist, gneiss, and granite. Turkey is now the major world producer of emery. Emery has been worked at several localities in the United States, most notably at Peekskill, N.Y.

The Mohs hardness of emery is about 8, whereas that of pure corundum is 9. Emery’s hardness has made it popular as an abrasive, particularly in sandpapers, although it has largely been replaced by synthetic materials such as alumina. Its largest application now is that of a nonskid material in floors, stair treads, and pavements. A very fine emery dust is used by lens grinders, lapidaries, and plate-glass manufacturers, although here too synthetic abrasives are often preferred for their more uniform grain sizes and properties. Emery wheels, once quite common, were made by mixing the powdered material with a bonding medium such as clay and firing in a kiln. In emery sticks, cloth (also called crocus cloth), and paper, the powdered emery is bonded to the backing with adhesive.


Watch the video: Gareth Emery live @ Metropolis Festival, Brooklyn Mirage, Jul 30th 2021 4K HD